The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

by H. G. Wells

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Overview

The Invisible Man is a science fiction novella by H. G. Wells. Originally serialized in Pearson's Weekly in 1897, it was published as a novel the same year. The Invisible Man of the title is Griffin, a scientist who has devoted himself to research into optics and invents a way to change a body's refractive index to that of air so that it neither absorbs nor reflects light and thus becomes invisible. He successfully carries out this procedure on himself, but fails in his attempt to reverse it.
While its predecessors, The Time Machine and The Island of Doctor Moreau, were written using first-person narrators, Wells adopts a third-person objective point of view in The Invisible Man.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783732649617
Publisher: Outlook Verlag
Publication date: 04/07/2018
Pages: 122
Sales rank: 866,106
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.44(d)
Age Range: 12 - 18 Years

About the Author

Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 - 13 August 1946) was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, and even including two books on recreational war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a]
During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of aircraft, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering. Brian Aldiss referred to Wells as the "Shakespeare of science fiction".[8] Wells rendered his works convincing by instilling commonplace detail alongside a single extraordinary assumption - dubbed "Wells's law" - leading Joseph Conrad to hail him in 1898 as "O Realist of the Fantastic!".[9] His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898) and the military science fiction The War in the Air (1907). Wells was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times.[10]
Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context.[11] He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he wrote little science fiction, while he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of journalist.[12] Novels such as Kipps and The History of Mr Polly, which describe lower-middle-class life, led to the suggestion that he was a worthy successor to Charles Dickens,[13]but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. A diabetic, Wells co-founded the charity The Diabetic Association (known today as Diabetes UK) in 1934
Herbert George Wells was born at Atlas House, 162 High Street in Bromley, Kent,[15] on 21 September 1866.[4] Called "Bertie" in the family, he was the fourth and last child of Joseph Wells (a former domestic gardener, and at the time a shopkeeper and professional cricketer) and his wife, Sarah Neal (a former domestic servant). An inheritance had allowed the family to acquire a shop in which they sold china and sporting goods, although it failed to prosper: the stock was old and worn out, and the location was poor. Joseph Wells managed to earn a meagre income, but little of it came from the shop and he received an unsteady amount of money from playing professional cricket for the Kent county team.[16] Payment for skilled bowlers and batsmen came from voluntary donations afterwards, or from small payments from the clubs where matches were played.

Date of Birth:

September 21, 1866

Date of Death:

August 13, 1946

Place of Birth:

Bromley, Kent, England

Place of Death:

London, England

Education:

Normal School of Science, London, England

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Invisible Man"
by .
Copyright © 2018 H.G. Wells.
Excerpted by permission of Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Introduction 7

Chapter I The Strange Man's Arrival 9

Chapter II Mr Teddy Henfrey's First Impressions 17

Chapter III The Thousand and One Bottles 24

Chapter IV Mr Cuss Interviews the Stranger 31

Chapter V The Burglary at the Vicarage 39

Chapter VI The Furniture That Went Mad 43

Chapter VII The Unveiling of the Stranger 49

Chapter VIII In Transit 60

Chapter IX Mr Thomas Marvel 61

Chapter X Mr Marvel's Visit to Iping 69

Chapter XI In the Coach and Horses 73

Chapter XII The Invisible Man Loses His Temper 78

Chapter XIII Mr Marvel Discusses His Resignation 85

Chapter XIV At Port Stowe 89

Chapter XV The Man Who Was Running 97

Chapter XVI In the Jolly Cricketers 100

Chapter XVII Doctor Kemp's Visitor 106

Chapter XVIII The Invisible Man Sleeps 117

Chapter XIX Certain First Principles 123

Chapter XX At the House in Great Portland Street 130

Chapter XXI In Oxford Street 143

Chapter XXII In the Emporium 150

Chapter XXIII In Drury Lane 158

Chapter XXIV The Plan that Failed 170

Chapter XXV The Hunting of the Invisible Man 176

Chapter XXVI The Wicksteed Murder 179

Chapter XXVII The Siege of Kemp's House 185

Chapter XXVIII The Hunter Hunted 197

The Epilogue 205

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Masterfully portrayed by Scott Brick—-each of his characterizations is an actorly tour de force—-The Invisible Man fascinates and mesmerizes, until it's gone." —-AudioFile

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