In the Name of God

In the Name of God

by Paula Jolin

Paperback(First Edition)

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Overview

They talked about doing things, of course, these macho cousins and uncles of mine. But nothing happens. God did not reward the Muslims for waiting in patience while the Unbelievers picked them off one by one, did He? God helps she who helps herself, she who helps the Muslims. Someone has to take control, right? I've already decided that someone will be me.

Nadia is an excellent student, daughter, and sister, living in Damascus, Syria. Above all, she strives to walk the straight path and follow the laws of Islam. But she's confused by the world around her and how she fits into it. She's conflicted about her Westernized cousins, the internal struggles of her country, and the war raging in Iraq. When her cousin is arrested by Syrian authorities for speaking out—betrayed by someone in the family—Nadia finds herself drawn into the dark world of Islamic fundamentalism. And she's about to face the biggest decision of her life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312384555
Publisher: Square Fish
Publication date: 10/28/2008
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Paula Jolin spent most of the last decade living and working in the Middle East. She has a masters degree in Islamic Studies and has written a number of non-fiction articles about Islam and the Arab world that have appeared in national children's magazines, including Calliope and New Moon: The Magazine for Girls and Their Dreams. She is also a reviewer for BookReporter.com and TeenReads.com.

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In the Name of God 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
meggyweg on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I was a bit stunned by this book; I'd never read anything like it before. I didn't like Nadia or her self-righteous zealotry, but I could understand her and why she was the way she was, and I give the author kudos for being able to put me, a normal WASP American girl from Ohio, into the shoes of a fundamentalist Muslim from Syria. A possible companion book would be Robert Cormier's After the First Death, which is also about terrorism from the perspective of the terrorists themselves.The only thing I didn't like about this book was the ending. It was a plausible way out, I suppose, but it felt like a cop-out to me. It was as if Paula Jolin suddenly lost her nerve.
DF1A_NataschaM on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Everyday we can observe it in the news and everyone knows Syria is a conflicted place. The life there is hard; no one is sure who to trust, who might be working for the government, or who might come to arrest you with no notice and seemingly no reason. Living in middle of Damascus the capital city of Syria, the seventeen-year-old teenager girl Nadia truly struggles with the whole circumstances. She is troubled by her family's seeming drifting away of their faith and totally disgusted by her cousins' approach to American values. The only thing where she can hold on is her devotion to Islam. Supported in her belief she becomes by her cousin Fowzi who seems to be the only one who understands her way of thinking. She truly believes in a modern education and wants to go on to university to study medicine rather than marry young and raise a family immediately. But she also follows the strict dress code of the Koran by wearing the hijab and acting modestly, as she thinks a proper Muslim woman should. All around her, however, people who share her ideas on Islam are being arrested, thrown in prison and tortured, including her cousin Fowzi for whom she secretly has feelings of admiring. To her it seems as if her whole family doesn¿t really care about it and that they are too much distracted with their own thoughts. Nadia knows she wants revenge for her cousin and Nadia¿s opportunity comes soon in the form of a young man named Walid, who is sympathetic to Nadia¿s more fundamentalist Muslim beliefs.Soon she is captured by his thinking and quickly falls for Walid¿s ideas. The main idea is simple; free the Islamic from every western influence. But how far will Nadia go and will anyone be able to stop her or will she maintain to get caught in the claws of this radical group? I loved this book because it asks engaging questions about the system of the Islam and its disunity. The role of women is also a much discussed topic and to me it seems to be a very important one. It paints a great picture about the middle-east and its culture and is a great written book which is really interesting to read.
chibimajo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nadia is a Syrian and devote Muslim. She is troubled by her family's seeming desertion of their faith, disgusted by her cousins' obsessions with boys and clothes and American values. Except for one slightly older male cousin. He still seems to be devote in his faith. In fact, he is so devote, that he is arrested for being a terrorist. This leads Nadia to track down another man who knew her cousin and add her support to their fanatic causes. This is a great look into the mind of a fanatic, you really sympathize with Nadia and her desire to see her family live justly.
DF1A_LizzyM on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Jolin shines in her first novel, In the Name of God. Nadia, a 17 year old girl, lives in Syria. She faces a world of strongly opinionated people where war, religion, and America are common, yet dangerous topics to speak of. When her cousin is arrested, Nadia decides that she must act in the name of her religion and make a point--even one that involves a suicide bombing. This story profiles the culture in the Middle East and offers a different view point of Americans. I would highly recommend this book for anyone who would like to see how radicals in the Middle East view Americans and justify their actions--it's all in the name of God.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
17-year-old Nadia lives in Damascus, Syria, in a two-bedroom apartment with her mother and her brother. Every day the war seems to move closer, every day the poverty seems to get a little bit worse, every day Nadia sees everyone moving further from the God she knows, and every day Nadia gets more angry. When her cousin is taken to places and torture unknown, Nadia knows it's time to take a stand. But how? And why does no one else understand?

Her family can't seem to give her the answers that she needs. Lately they almost seem afraid of her. The only person who seems to understand is the mysterious rebel who appears with cryptic messages. With each meeting with this man, Nadia is more and more sure that he has the right idea. With his help she will finally be able to make her stand, as God intended.

This was a book that I desperately wanted to read, and was terrified of, all at the same time. I wasn't sure what I would come across, but I knew it was going to be important somehow. And it was, but not in the way that I expected.

One of the most important things I took from IN THE NAME OF GOD is that religious zealotry doesn't have to be a quick, dramatic event. It can be a slow, building descent, full of little moments that may not seem too consequential until you add them all together. Involved in it is a strong desire to do right, to fix things, to make things better, and to make a statement. You can't hate Nadia for believing so strongly, and for wanting to make a difference, as much as you hope that she changes her path.

Another thing that I found particularly telling was a moment when a friend of a cousin says he lived in the U.S. One of Nadia's cousins asks if he lived in New York or Hollywood. At first it was kind of funny, until I thought about it. Are those the only faces our country presents to the outside world? After that was more discussion about the perceptions of life in America versus the reality. Which was enlightening to say the least. If for no other reason than these, we need more books like this in the world. Maybe if there were, we would all be a bit more understanding.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'In the name of God' was a great book that touched on modern topics like 9/11 and suicide bombing. The main character is a Muslim girl named Nadia who lives in Syria and shows the reader a seldom-viewed aspect on current world events. She has a very strong character and adamently supports her religion. It's a touching story that shows the length some people will go to for those that they love and what they believe in. Entwined with hints of romance, secrecy, and betrayal, Jolin has written a book that gets more intense with every page, leading up to a final scene where Nadia has to decide between supporting her religion and forgiving her family...
Guest More than 1 year ago
17-year-old Nadia lives in Damascus, Syria, in a two-bedroom apartment with her mother and her brother. Every day the war seems to move closer, every day the poverty seems to get a little bit worse, every day Nadia sees everyone moving further from the God she knows, and every day Nadia gets more angry. When her cousin is taken to places and torture unknown, Nadia knows it's time to take a stand. But how? And why does no one else understand? Her family can't seem to give her the answers that she needs. Lately they almost seem afraid of her. The only person who seems to understand is the mysterious rebel who appears with cryptic messages. With each meeting with this man, Nadia is more and more sure that he has the right idea. With his help she will finally be able to make her stand, as God intended. This was a book that I desperately wanted to read, and was terrified of, all at the same time. I wasn't sure what I would come across, but I knew it was going to be important somehow. And it was, but not in the way that I expected. One of the most important things I took from IN THE NAME OF GOD is that religious zealotry doesn't have to be a quick, dramatic event. It can be a slow, building descent, full of little moments that may not seem too consequential until you add them all together. Involved in it is a strong desire to do right, to fix things, to make things better, and to make a statement. You can't hate Nadia for believing so strongly, and for wanting to make a difference, as much as you hope that she changes her path. Another thing that I found particularly telling was a moment when a friend of a cousin says he lived in the U.S. One of Nadia's cousins asks if he lived in New York or Hollywood. At first it was kind of funny, until I thought about it. Are those the only faces our country presents to the outside world? After that was more discussion about the perceptions of life in America versus the reality. Which was enlightening to say the least. If for no other reason than these, we need more books like this in the world. Maybe if there were, we would all be a bit more understanding. **Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman