Idoru

Idoru

by William Gibson

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

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Overview

“The best novel William Gibson has ever written about the world we’re entering daily. Neuromancer made Gibson famous; Idoru cements that fame.”—The Washington Post Book World

21st century Tokyo, after the millennial quake. Neon rain. Light everywhere blowing under any door you might try to close. Where the New Buildings, the largest in the world, erect themselves unaided, their slow rippling movements like the contractions of a sea-creature...

Colin Laney is here looking for work. He is an intuitive fisher for patterns of information, the “signature” an individual creates simply by going about the business of living. But Laney knows how to sift for the dangerous bits. Which makes him useful—to certain people.
 
Chia McKenzie is here on a rescue mission. She’s fourteen. Her idol is the singer Rez, of the band Lo/Rez. When the Seattle chapter of the Lo/Rez fan club decided that he might be in trouble in Tokyo, they sent Chia to check it out.
 
Rei Toei is the idoru—the beautiful, entirely virtual media star adored by all Japan. Rez has declared that he will marry her. This is the rumor that has brought Chia to Tokyo. True or not, the idoru and the powerful interests surrounding her are enough to put all their lives in danger...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425158647
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/01/1997
Series: Bridge Trilogy Series , #2
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 260,833
Product dimensions: 6.62(w) x 10.98(h) x 1.09(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

William Gibson’s first novel, Neuromancer, won the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and the Philip K. Dick Award. He is also the New York Times bestselling author of Count ZeroBurning ChromeMona Lisa OverdriveVirtual LightIdoruAll Tomorrow’s PartiesPattern RecognitionSpook CountryZero HistoryDistrust That Particular Flavor, and The Peripheral. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, with his wife.

Hometown:

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Date of Birth:

March 17, 1948

Place of Birth:

Conway, South Carolina

Education:

B.A., University of British Columbia, 1977

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Idoru 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 43 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is heartening to see what nearly 20 years of seasoning can do for an author. Idoru is a sophisticated, delightful twist on Gibson's previous formula. The characters are more real and engaging, the plot more intuitive and less formulaic than his previous endeavors. Idoru is like great jazz music: when you try to pin down what makes it work, the full answers slip through your fingers. I had respect for Gibson when I read Neuromancer, but despite being more famous, it reads like a first novel. This book is seasoned talent let out to play, and it's a joy to behold.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been a big fan of William Gibson's work since I read Neuromancer so many years ago. Although I was somewhat disappointed by Virtual Light, the follow-up, Idoru, renewed my faith. As the middle book in the Bridge Trilogy, Idoru sets up a diverse cast of characters, including a virtual pop star, a rock star, an avid fan, and a computer technician (for lack of a better term) who sees patterns in fields of data, and draws them all together in post-earthquake Japan. Although Gibson's plot takes some unusual, typically-Gibsonesque leaps, it is the interaction of the characters that will draw you in. A lesser writer would have bungled this, but Gibson's poetic prose is up to the challenge. Like most good science-fiction, Gibson uses his created world to make points about our own, lingering especially long over the topics of the nature of celebrity and the fine line between advanced artificial intelligence and human life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After I stumbled upon 'Neuromancer' a couple of years ago I read nearly all of Gibson's books (I have tried to pace myself as I would otherwise run out of his titles). Of both triologies I think that 'Idoru' is the best story he has written and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I'd recommend Gibson to anyone, but I would especially recommend this title if you're ready to pursue a really fantastic cyber punk story.
jbushnell on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I think of this as maybe the "pivotal" Gibson novel? The one to go to if you want both immersive VR landscapes AND meditations on fashion and celebrity. Good stuff.
girlunderglass on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
End-of- 21st century Tokyo. Three interconnected lives.The story."Colin Laney is here looking for work. He is an intuitive fisher for patterns of information, the "signature" an individual creates simply by going about the business of living. But Laney knows how to sift for the dangerous bits. Which makes him useful - to certain people.Chia McKenzie is here on a rescue mission. She's fourteen. Her idol is the singer Rez, of the band Lo/Rez. When the Seattle chapter of the Lo/Rez fan club decided that he might be in trouble in Tokyo, they sent Chia to check it out.Rei Toei is the idoru - the beautiful, entirely virtual media star adored by all Japan. Rez has declared that he will marry her. This is the rumor that has brought Chia to Tokyo. True or not, the idoru and the powerful interests surrounding her are enough to put all their lives in danger." That's basically the plot. If you think that sounds interesting you're going to love it. If that's not your kind of book, don't bother. But the book was not just about the plot. Gibson said that Colin Laney's ability to "identify nodal points" and find patterns in seemingly non-related data is similar to the author's own ability to "predict" the future based on the present. "Laney¿s node-spotter function is some sort of metaphor for whatever it is that I actually do. There are bits of the literal future right here, right now, if you know how to look for them. Although I can¿t tell you how; it¿s a non-rational process." Now that is what I loved most about Idoru. Every single thing that happens in this book, even all the things that don't happen, that merely exist, that just are - the bits and pieces that constitute this world - are so believable. Every new element of this universe Gibson has created feels instantly real. You will exclaim, over and over "But of course the future's going to be like this!" And because the future in this book is not so distant - merely at the end of the present century - you can identify along with Gibson the first signs of what is to come in the world around you. It's not something imaginary, it's here already. This is not some figment of one brilliant/lunatic author's imagination - this must be how things will be for our children's children, right? Loved the story, loved the characters and loved the technology. There are also many popular culture references, which are always a plus in my book. (For example, the protagonist goes to a Franz Kafka-themed club, where each room is decorated according to a different story of Kafka's) Only two little warnings if you plan on reading Idoru. One: some paragraphs might be tricky at first, usually because you're not familiar with the equipment introduced or with the invented terms for the new technologies. Go back to them if necessary, don't skip things or you might miss out on important story elements. Two: a fascinating part of the book was, for me, the description of the new gadgets and apparatuses, products of the scientific progress that has been achieved in the last decades of the century; how computers will look in the near-future, what will they be able to do, how software will evolve, how the music industry or the different companies will use this technology, how advertisements will be made, etcetera. For me, being a music freak, writing for a music blog online, not being able to live without my laptop, loving to try out new software, constantly downloading the latest updates for pc programs, and appreciating pop culture references, this book combined all my interests. Which is probably why I enjoyed it so much. If you have no interest in all these things mentioned, then you're probably not going to love the book. You might appreciate the writer's talent or might enjoy the plot twists or (what look like, but don't feel like) sci-fi elements, but I don't think you're going to love it. I described it the best I could. Now just ask yourself: are you a compute
briony on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have never been a massive SF fan, but I really really enjoyed this book.
heidilove on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i'm not a gibson fan, but i liked this anyway.
Winterrain on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
William Gibson is one of my favorite authors of all time, and so I hold this book to a slightly higher standard than I would otherwise. It's a fine read- it doesn't lag and the style is as good as it gets, but Gibson has written better. There are two main characters, Laney and Chia, and I found the latter to be much more interesting than the former. For some I think it would be the other way around, but there's a definite lack of balance between the two storylines.
yenzie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Typical Gibson. Excellent capture of the cyberpunk zeitgeist, a plotline that is a little weaker.
carlosemferreira on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another cracker by Gibson, different from the brilliant Virtual Light, but paving the way for a discussion closer to the terms of his previous work. Excellent read.
isabelx on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Alison Shires, glimpsed first as animated headshots, five months into his time at Slitscan, had been an rather ordinarily attractive girl murmuring her stats to imagined casting directors, agents, someone, anyone.Kathy Torrance had watched his face, as he watched the screen. "'Babed out' yet, Laney? allergic reaction to cute? First symptoms are a sort of underlying irritation, a resentment, a vague but persistent feeling that you're being gotten at, taken advantage of . . . "The teenagers in this book are totally at home on the net. Fourteen-year-old Chia is a member of the Seattle chapter of the Lo/Rez fan club, whose fellow fangirls send her to Japan to stay with a member of the Tokyo chapter and try to find out the truth behind the rumours that rock start Rez is planning to marry an idoru, a virtual singer who is projected as a hologram and does not actually exist. Quantitative analyst Laney, who has a talent for finding nodes of relevant information among the undifferentiated mass of data on the net, is also in Tokyo having been hired by Lo/Rez's management to investigate the same thing. Chia finds herself in big trouble before she even gets off the plane, while Laney's previous employers, the producers of a muckraking TV show about celebrities called Slitscan, haven't finished with him yet .In this book, the equivalent of The Bridge is the The Walled City, a virtual copy of the Walled City of Kowloon, an online community set apart from the net, which you can't visit without an invitation and where the rules of the net do not apply. The nanotech buildings of the real Tokyo that are mentioned in "Virtual Light" are really quite odd and I can see why people who aren't used to them find them unnerving.If anything I liked this even more than "Virtual Light", as it goes into more depth about the consequences of the new virtual reality technology on various groups in society, such as fangirls, unsociable teenage boys and the criminal underworld.
bastet on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A fascinating look at the future, written by a master of the genre.
xtien on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When you read this book you gradually realize that the main character is an avatar. This book predicts the future of the internet, the future of us, in exactly the same way Gibson did with Neuromancer, in which he predicted the internet itself (coining the words "the matrix").
gazzy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Cyber-fiction look at the near future where the queen of pop is computer generated. Inventive story lines that are a good 15 20 years ahead of hollywood.
mouse612 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I picked up Idoru after five years of not reading science fiction, having exhausted my willingness to deal with the techno bits of the genre; admittedly I was reading lots of space exploration type books. I emerged from the book as if drugged. Gibson's hypnotic writing explodes the reader into moral issues as good science fiction should. This book also brings to mind Murakami's work but I found it more accessible.
szarka on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a great read for a long car trip. Although it's ten years old and set in the not-so-distant future, Gibson gets so much right that it still rings true. [2006-01-19]
Gilbert_M_Stack More than 1 year ago
I tend to like Gibson novels, and I guess I liked this one, but there was too little plot for me this time around. I didn’t really get into the book until Rei, the Idoru, appeared, and there was much too little of her to help us understand what was going on. I felt the same about the marriage of Rez and Rei. I would have liked to have more insight into what was happening between the two of them. This book just left me wanting.
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