The Hidden Dance

The Hidden Dance

by Susan Wooldridge

NOOK Book(eBook)

$5.49 $5.99 Save 8% Current price is $5.49, Original price is $5.99. You Save 8%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Overview

On March 1st 1933 the luxury liner SS Etoile sets sail from Southampton en route for New York. England has finally emerged from the terrors of the Great War and yet the new optimism in Europe is tempered by the stirring of Hitler’s National Socialists in Germany. Surely another war is unthinkable?

On board the liner is Lily Sutton – a fragile but determined woman who is seeking to escape the brutality of her failed marriage, and begin life anew in America. During the five days at sea, Lily is caught between the world she leaves behind, with its attendant riches and position in society, and her new-found love, which has given her the strength and courage to be herself. Travelling in steerage so as not to attract attention, Lily is terrified that her flight from England will be uncovered. But a new friendship makes the journey easier to bear...until an old enemy surfaces and Lily must do everything she can to protect those she loves most in the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780749007638
Publisher: Allison & Busby, Limited
Publication date: 07/06/2009
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 432
File size: 462 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Susan Wooldridge is probably best known to the public for her role as Daphne Manners in the award-winning The Jewel in the Crown, for which she was BAFTA nominated and won the ALVA (Asian Listeners and Viewers of Great Britain Award) for Best Actress.

Having trained at the Central School of Speech and Drama and École Jacques Lecoq in Paris, Susan followed in the footsteps of her mother, the actress Margaretta Scott, and worked extensively on the stage both in London and around the country in repertory theatre. She went on to become a well-known face on both television and film, winning the BAFTA award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in John Boorman’s Hope and Glory.

Having appeared in the award-winning BBC drama Bad Company, about the Bridgewater Four, Susan became actively involved in the campaign to overturn this terrible miscarriage of justice. Susan lives in London with her partner, writer and theatre director Andy de la Tour.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Hidden Dance 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
MariaSavva on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A good debut novel. Well written, and obviously well researched. It is clear that the writer has spent a lot of time perfecting the story, with the references to historical facts dotted here and there throughout the novel. It reminded me of the first half of Kate Morton's 'The House at Riverton', as it was very slow moving and the characters were very 'Upstairs, Downstairs'. There isn't really anything original in this book, nothing that hasn't been written before and better, but there is a hint on the very last page that this author may well have something, and may be worth looking out for in the future. Debut novels are notoriously hit or miss. This was a bit of a miss in my opinion. I think the pace could have been picked up a bit, especially in the dramatic scenes.In this novel, we follow Lily Sutton in her journey to escape her violent husband. It is set in the early 20th Century. Her journey takes her from England to New York. There are a few memorable scenes, but nothing special. I wouldn't really recommend this book to anyone as I was left unsure whether I liked it or not.The author seemed to have difficulty making up her mind whether she was going to refer to the characters formally e.g. Mrs Webb, Mrs. Sutton, or informally, e.g. Nellie or Lily. The references to the character names was quite confusing at times because she would refer to Lily as 'Lily' on one page and then on the next 'Mrs Sutton'. The effect was to give the prose a disjointed feel, as if the author should really have been writing in the first person, rather than the third person, because it seemed that in some cases she was trying to 'show' the action from the viewpoint of a particular character.On the whole, the author has made a good start, and I would definitely be interested in reading her next book. I liked one line on the last page very much, the reference to the title of the book, and from that I got the feeling that if the author would open up a bit and try to be more creative rather than trying to imitate writers that have come before, she would be very successful.
MariaSavva_Author More than 1 year ago
A good debut novel. Well written, and obviously well researched. It is clear that the writer has spent a lot of time perfecting the story, with the references to historical facts dotted here and there throughout the novel. It reminded me of the first half of Kate Morton's 'The House at Riverton', as it was very slow moving and the characters were very 'Upstairs, Downstairs'. There isn't really anything original in this book, nothing that hasn't been written before and better, but there is a hint on the very last page that this author may well have something, and may be worth looking out for in the future. Debut novels are notoriously hit or miss. This was a bit of a miss in my opinion. I think the pace could have been picked up a bit, especially in the dramatic scenes. In this novel, we follow Lily Sutton in her journey to escape her violent husband. It is set in the early 20th Century. Her journey takes her from England to New York. There are a few memorable scenes, but nothing special. I wouldn't really recommend this book to anyone as I was left unsure whether I liked it or not. The author seemed to have difficulty making up her mind whether she was going to refer to the characters formally e.g. Mrs Webb, Mrs. Sutton, or informally, e.g. Nellie or Lily. The references to the character names was quite confusing at times because she would refer to Lily as 'Lily' on one page and then on the next 'Mrs Sutton'. The effect was to give the prose a disjointed feel, as if the author should really have been writing in the first person, rather than the third person, because it seemed that in some cases she was trying to 'show' the action from the viewpoint of a particular character. On the whole, the author has made a good start, and I would definitely be interested in reading her next book. I liked one line on the last page very much, the reference to the title of the book, and from that I got the feeling that if the author would open up a bit and try to be more creative rather than trying to imitate writers that have come before, she would be very successful