He That Will Not When He May

He That Will Not When He May

by Margaret Oliphant

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Overview

Margaret Oliphant (1828-1897) was a prolific Scottish writer who wrote romance novels with strong female characters. She was quite prolific and also published works in other genres such as historical fiction and stories dealing with the supernatural.

In 'He That Will Not When He May', Oliphant explores a traditional theme in her work - the roles that society assigns to men and women. Her subtle expressions of frustration hint at a support for some limited social realignment between the sexes, if not between the classes. This novel is set in a 19th century English village where the stately Markham family reigns supreme. Prior to the events of the story, the family had been blessed with prosperity and joy. But this begins to crumble when a lost heir arrives on the scene...

Fans of Jane Austen and good historical romance in general will enjoy this little gem.

*This special edition includes an annotated image gallery.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940150501003
Publisher: Enhanced E-Books
Publication date: 11/11/2014
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 432
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

The daughter of Francis W. Wilson (c.1788–1858), a clerk, and his wife, Margaret Oliphant (c.1789–1854), she was born at Wallyford, near Musselburgh, East Lothian, and spent her childhood at Lasswade (near Dalkeith), Glasgow and Liverpool. As a girl, she constantly experimented with writing. In 1849 she had her first novel published: Passages in the Life of Mrs. Margaret Maitland. This dealt with the Scottish Free Church movement, with which Mr. and Mrs. Wilson both sympathised, and met with some success. It was followed by Caleb Field in 1851, the year in which she met the publisher William Blackwood in Edinburgh and was invited to contribute to the famous Blackwood's Magazine. The connection was to last for her whole lifetime, during which she contributed well over 100 articles, including, a critique of the character of Arthur Dimmesdale in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.

In May 1852, she married her cousin, Frank Wilson Oliphant, at Birkenhead, and settled at Harrington Square in London. An artist working mainly in stained glass, her husband had delicate health, and three of their six children died in infancy, while the father himself developed alarming symptoms of consumption. For the sake of his health they moved in January 1859 to Florence, and then to Rome, where Frank Oliphant died. His wife, left almost entirely without resources, returned to England and took up the burden of supporting her three remaining children by her own literary activity.
She had now become a popular writer, and worked with amazing industry to sustain her position.
Unfortunately, her home life was full of sorrow and disappointment. In January 1864 her only remaining daughter Maggie died in Rome, and was buried in her father's grave. Her brother, who had emigrated to Canada, was shortly afterwards involved in financial ruin, and Mrs. Oliphant offered a home to him and his children, and added their support to her already heavy responsibilities.

In the 1880s she was the literary mentor of the Irish novelist Emily Lawless. During this time Oliphant wrote several works of supernatural fiction, including the long ghost story A Beleaguered City (1880) and several short tales, including "The Open Door" and "Old Lady Mary."

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