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Overview

Scientific and philosophical perspectives on hallucination: essays that draw on empirical evidence from psychology, neuroscience, and cutting-edge philosophical theory.

Reflection on the nature of hallucination has relevance for many traditional philosophical debates concerning the nature of the mind, perception, and our knowledge of the world. In recent years, neuroimaging techniques and scientific findings on the nature of hallucination, combined with interest in new philosophical theories of perception such as disjunctivism, have brought the topic of hallucination once more to the forefront of philosophical thinking. Scientific evidence from psychology, neuroscience, and psychiatry sheds light on the functional role and physiology of actual hallucinations; some disjunctivist theories offer a radically new and different philosophical conception of hallucination. This volume offers interdisciplinary perspectives on the nature of hallucination, offering essays by both scientists and philosophers.

Contributors first consider topics from psychology and neuroscience, including neurobiological mechanisms of hallucination and the nature and phenomenology of auditory-verbal hallucinations. Philosophical discussions follow, with contributors first considering disjunctivism and then, more generally, the relation between hallucination and the nature of experience.

Contributors
István Aranyosi, Richard P. Bentall, Paul Coates, Fabian Dorsch, Katalin Farkas, Charles Fernyhough, Dominic H. ffytche, Benj Hellie, Matthew Kennedy, Fiona Macpherson, Ksenija Maravic da Silva, Peter Naish, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Matthew Nudds, Costas Pagondiotis, Ian Phillips, Dimitris Platchias, Howard Robinson, Susanna Schellenberg, Filippo Varese

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262019200
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 08/30/2013
Series: The MIT Press
Pages: 432
Product dimensions: 7.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Fiona Macpherson is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for the Study of Perceptual Experience at the University of Glasgow.

Dimitris Platchias is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Philosophy at the University of York.

Fiona Macpherson is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for the Study of Perceptual Experience at the University of Glasgow.

Dimitris Platchias is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Philosophy at the University of York.

Table of Contents

Preface vii

Contributors ix

1 The Philosophy and Psychology of Hallucination: An Introduction Fiona Macpherson 1

2 Introduction to the Chapters Dimitris Platchias 39

I Psychology 43

3 The Hallucinating Brain: Neurobiological Insights into the Nature of Hallucinations Dominic H. ffytche 45

4 Psychotic Hallucinations Richard P. Bentall Filippo Varese 65

5 Thinking Aloud about Mental Voices Charles Fernyhough Simon McCarthy-Jones 87

6 The Neuropsychology of Visual Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease and the Continuum Hypothesis Ksenija Maravic da Silva 105

7 Hallucinations in Hypnosis Peter Naish 121

II Philosophy: Reflections on Disjunctivism 147

8 The Multidisjunctive Conception of Hallucination Benj Heilie 149

9 Experience and Introspection Fabian Dorsch 175

10 Explanation in Good and Bad Experiential Cases Matthew Kennedy 221

11 Silencing the Argument from Hallucination István Aranyosi 255

12 Naive Realism and Hallucinations Matthew Nudds 271

13 Externalism and the Gappy Content of Hallucination Susanna Schellenberg 291

14 The Failure of Disjunctivism to Deal with "Philosophers' Hallucinations" Howard Robinson 313

III Philosophy: The Nature of Experience 331

15 Hearing and Hallucinating Silence Ian Phillips 333

16 Hallucination, Mental Representation, and the Presentational Character Costas Pagondiotis 361

17 Hallucinations and the Transparency of Perception Paul Coates 381

18 A Sense of Reality Katalin Farkas 399

Index 417

What People are Saying About This

Mohan Matthen

A vital addition to the literature on perception. Macpherson and Platchias have put together a lively, informative, and provocative collection of essays on hallucination. The scientific essays take us far beyond glib philosophical examples—Lady Macbeth's dagger and so on. The philosophical sections relate to recent controversies: the much discussed doctrine of 'naive realism' and reflections on what hallucination teaches us about the nature of perceptual experience in general.

Susanna Siegel

Hallucination is the definitive collection on the philosophy and psychology of hallucination, offering a wide range of perspectives on this fascinating phenomenon. Macpherson provides a marvelous introduction, zeroing in with characteristic acuity on issues surrounding hallucination raised by experimental psychology, the metaphysics of perception, and epistemology.

From the Publisher

A vital addition to the literature on perception. Macpherson and Platchias have put together a lively, informative, and provocative collection of essays on hallucination. The scientific essays take us far beyond glib philosophical examples—Lady Macbeth's dagger and so on. The philosophical sections relate to recent controversies: the much discussed doctrine of 'naive realism' and reflections on what hallucination teaches us about the nature of perceptual experience in general.

Mohan Matthen , Canada Research Chair in Philosophy, University of Toronto

Hallucination is the definitive collection on the philosophy and psychology of hallucination, offering a wide range of perspectives on this fascinating phenomenon. Macpherson provides a marvelous introduction, zeroing in with characteristic acuity on issues surrounding hallucination raised by experimental psychology, the metaphysics of perception, and epistemology.

Susanna Siegel , Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University

Endorsement

Hallucination is the definitive collection on the philosophy and psychology of hallucination, offering a wide range of perspectives on this fascinating phenomenon. Macpherson provides a marvelous introduction, zeroing in with characteristic acuity on issues surrounding hallucination raised by experimental psychology, the metaphysics of perception, and epistemology.

Susanna Siegel, Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University

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