Graphic Classics, Volume 17: Science Fiction Classics

Graphic Classics, Volume 17: Science Fiction Classics

Paperback

$17.95
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Overview

The first full-color volume in the Graphic Classics© series features an all-new comics adaptation of H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds" by Rich Rainey and Micah Farritor. Also E.M. Forster's dark vision of the future "The Machine Stops", illustrated by Ellen Lindner. Plus stories by Jules Verne, Stanley Weinbaum, Lord Dunsany and Arthur Conan Doyle, with art by Brad Teare, George Sellas, Roger Langridge, Johnny Ryan and Hunt Emerson.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780978791971
Publisher: Eureka Productions
Publication date: 06/28/2009
Series: Graphic Classics (Eureka) Series , #17
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range: 13 - 16 Years

About the Author

H.G. Wells (1866-1946) published his first novel, The Time Machine, to critical and popular acclaim in 1895. Socially progressive and visionary in intellect, he became one of the most prolific writers of his generation. Through books like The Invisible Man and War of the Worlds, he explored a wide variety of social, philosophical, and political ideas through the medium of what we now call science fiction.

Date of Birth:

September 21, 1866

Date of Death:

August 13, 1946

Place of Birth:

Bromley, Kent, England

Place of Death:

London, England

Education:

Normal School of Science, London, England

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Graphic Classics, Volume 17: Science Fiction Classics 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
ElizaJane on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Reason for Reading: I'm working my way through the series and it's not necessary to read them in any given order.Comments: This graphic novel contains an anthology of graphic adaptations of one novel and five short stories. H.G. Well's War of the Worlds is included as are tales by authors such as Hans Christian Anderson, Conan Doyle, Stanley Weinbaum and E.M. Forster's one and only sci-fi short story.As a big fan of this series the first big news about this volume is that it is the very first one to be printed in full colour. And they couldn't have picked a better theme to introduce colour. The book has a joyful feel of a 1950's sci-fi comic and even artwork to match in Stanley Weinbaum's "A Martian Odyssey" illustrated by George Sellas. The artwork in each story is suitable to the tale being told and goes from dark Victorian scenes to bright modern comic characters. A delightful set of stories which I enjoyed heartily and had never read before, except of course H.G. Wells' novel. I just love coming across Conan Doyle's stories that do not concern his famous detective and this one is no disappointment but my favourite in the volume is E.M. Forster's "The Machine Stops" which is a chilling dystopia of a world run by machines, amazingly written in 1909. The illustrations are wonderful and pay homage to his other work by showing a delightful Indian flavour both in the characters and colourful palette.Another great book in the series! These books just don't disappoint. I only have one concern now and that is with the new addition of colour that they will continue to use colour for each new volume. I would hate to see the b/w volumes disappear altogether and hope they will give great thought on the theme of each volume as to whether colour or b/w is more appropriate. For ex. the Edgar Allan Poe volume just would not have been the same done in colour; you would lose the Gothic feel.Great news, they already have another volume planned for this year. Out in November 2009 will be Louisa May Alcott, Volume 18.
JTomCooper More than 1 year ago
This is a comic book rendering of six classic stories by top notch authors, including H.G. Wells and Jules Verne. The stories are told with good graphic illustrations by six different artists. It can be read by pre-teens, or anyone older than that, even older adults like me. I was particularly impressed by the art work of Micah Farritor in his rendition of The War of the Worlds. A good stocking stuffer.