Good Girl, Bad Girl: A Novel

Good Girl, Bad Girl: A Novel

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Overview

From the bestselling author of The Secrets She Keeps, the writer Stephen King calls “an absolute master…with heart and soul,” a fiendishly clever suspense novel about a dangerous young woman with a special ability to know when someone is lying—and the criminal psychologist who must outwit her to survive.

A girl is discovered hiding in a secret room in the aftermath of a terrible crime. Half-starved and filthy, she won’t tell anyone her name, or her age, or where she came from. Maybe she is twelve, maybe fifteen. She doesn’t appear in any missing persons file, and her DNA can’t be matched to an identity. Six years later, still unidentified, she is living in a secure children’s home with a new name, Evie Cormac. When she initiates a court case demanding the right to be released as an adult, forensic psychologist Cyrus Haven must determine if Evie is ready to go free. But she is unlike anyone he’s ever met—fascinating and dangerous in equal measure. Evie knows when someone is lying, and no one around her is telling the truth.

Meanwhile, Cyrus is called in to investigate the shocking murder of a high school figure-skating champion, Jodie Sheehan, who dies on a lonely footpath close to her home. Pretty and popular, Jodie is portrayed by everyone as the ultimate girl-next-door, but as Cyrus peels back the layers, a secret life emerges—one that Evie Cormac, the girl with no past, knows something about. A man haunted by his own tragic history, Cyrus is caught between the two cases—one girl who needs saving and another who needs justice. What price will he pay for the truth? Fiendishly clever, swiftly paced, and emotionally explosive, Good Girl, Bad Girl is the perfect thrilling summer read from internationally bestselling author Michael Robotham.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781508280156
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
Publication date: 07/23/2019
Edition description: Unabridged
Sales rank: 736,854
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 5.60(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Michael Robotham is a former investigative journalist whose psychological thrillers have been translated into twenty-three languages. In 2015 he won the prestigious UK Gold Dagger for his novel Life or Death, which was also shortlisted for the 2016 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best novel. Michael has twice won a Ned Kelly Award for Australia’s best crime novel for Lost in 2015 and Shatter in 2008. He has also twice been shortlisted for the CWA UK Steel Dagger in 2007 for The Night Ferry and 2008 with Shatter. He lives in Sydney with his wife and three daughters.

Read an Excerpt

Good Girl, Bad Girl


  • “Which one is she?” I ask, leaning closer to the observation window.

    “Blonde. Baggy sweater. Sitting on her own.”

    “And you’re not going to tell me why I’m here?”

    “I don’t want to influence your decision.”

    “What am I deciding?”

    “Just watch her.”

    I look again at the group of teenagers, girls and boys. Most are wearing jeans and long tops with the sleeves pulled down to hide whatever self-inflicted damage has been done. Some are cutters, some are burners or scratchers or bulimics or anorexics or obsessive compulsives or pyromaniacs or sociopaths or narcissists or suffering from ADHD. Some abuse food or drugs, others swallow foreign objects or run into walls on purpose or take outrageous risks.

    Evie Cormac has her knees drawn up, almost as though she doesn’t trust the floor. Sullen mouthed and pretty, she could be eighteen or she could be fourteen. Not quite a woman or a girl about to bid good-bye to childhood, yet there is something ageless and changeless about her, as if she has seen the worst and survived it. With brown eyes framed by thickened eyelashes and bleached hair cut in a ragged bob, she’s holding the sleeves of her sweater in her bunched fists, stretching the neckline, revealing a pattern of red blotches below her jawline that could be hickeys or finger marks.

    Adam Guthrie is standing alongside me, regarding Evie like she is the latest arrival at Twycross Zoo.

    “Why is she here?” I ask.

    “Currently, her primary offense is for aggravated assault. She broke someone’s jaw with a half brick.”

    “Currently?”

    “She’s had a few.”

    “How many?”

    “Too few to mention.”

    He’s attempting to be funny or deliberately obtuse. We’re at Langford Hall, a high-security children’s home in Nottingham, where Guthrie is a resident social worker. He’s dressed in baggy jeans, combat boots, and a rugby sweater, trying too hard to look like “one of them”; someone who can relate to teenage delinquency and strife rather than an underpaid, low-level public servant with a wife, a mortgage, and two kids. He and I were at university together and lived in the same college. I wouldn’t say we were friends, more like passing acquaintances, although I went to his wedding a few years ago and slept with one of the bridesmaids. I didn’t know she was Guthrie’s youngest sister. Would it have made a difference? I’m not sure. He hasn’t held it against me.

    “You ready?”

    I nod.

    We enter the room and take two chairs, joining the circle of teenagers, who watch us with a mixture of suspicion and boredom.

    “We have a visitor today,” says Guthrie. “This is Cyrus Haven.”

    “Who is he?” asks one of the girls.

    “I’m a psychologist,” I reply.

    “Another one!” says the same girl, screwing up her face.

    “Cyrus is here to observe.”

    “Us or you?”

    “Both.”

    I look for Evie’s reaction. She’s watching me blankly.

    Guthrie crosses his legs, revealing a hairless pale ankle where his trouser cuff has ridden up his shin. He’s a jolly, fat sort of bloke who rubs his hands together at the start of something, presupposing the fun that awaits.

    “Let’s begin with some introductions, shall we? I want you to each tell Cyrus your name, where you’re from, and why you’re here. Who wants to go first?”

    Nobody answers.

    “How about you, Alana?”

    She shakes her head. I’m sitting directly opposite Evie. She knows I’m looking at her.

    “Holly?” asks Guthrie.

    “Nah.”

    “Evie?”

    She doesn’t respond.

    “It’s nice to see you’re wearing more clothes today,” says Guthrie. “You too, Holly.”

    Evie snorts.

    “That was a legitimate protest,” argues Holly, growing more animated. “We were protesting against the outdated assumptions of class and gender inherent in this white-male-dominated gulag.”

    “Thank you, comrade,” says Guthrie, sarcastically. “Will you get us started, Nathan?”

    “Don’t call me Nathan,” says a beanpole of a boy with pimples on his forehead.

    “What should I call you?”

    “Nat.”

    “You mean like a bug?” asks Evie.

    He spells it out: “N . . . A . . . T.”

    Guthrie takes a small knitted teddy bear from his pocket and tosses it to Nat. “You’re up first. Remember, whoever has the bear has the right to speak. Nobody else can interrupt.”

    Nat bounces the teddy bear on his thigh.

    “I’m from Sheffield and I’m here ’cos I took a dump in my neighbor’s VW when he left it unlocked.”

    Titters all round. Evie doesn’t join in.

    “Why did you do that?” asks Guthrie.

    Nat shrugs nonchalantly. “It were a laugh.”

    “On the driver’s seat?” asks Holly.

    “Yeah. Course. Where else? The dickhead complained to the police, so me and my mates gave him a kicking.”

    “Do you feel bad about that?” asks Guthrie.

    “Not really.”

    “He had to have metal plates put in his head.”

    “Yeah, but he had insurance and he got compensation. My ma had to pay a fine. Way I see it, the dickhead made money.”

    Guthrie starts to argue but changes his mind, perhaps recognizing the futility.

    The teddy bear is passed on to Reebah from Nottingham, who is painfully thin and who sewed her lips together because her father tried to make her eat.

    “What did he make you eat?” asks another of the girls, who is so fat that her thighs are forcing her knees apart.

    “Food.”

    “What sort of food?”

    “Birthday cake.”

    “You’re an idiot.”

    Guthrie interrupts, “Please don’t make critical comments, Cordelia. You can only speak if you have the bear.”

    “Give it to me, then,” she says, snatching the bear from Reebah’s lap.

    “Hey! I wasn’t finished.”

    The girls wrestle for a moment until Guthrie intervenes, but Reebah has forgotten what she wanted to say.

    The bear is in a new lap. “My name is Cordelia and I’m from Leeds and when someone pisses me off, I fight them, you know. I make ’em pay.”

    “You get angry?” asks Guthrie.

    “Yeah.”

    “What sort of things make you angry?”

    “When people call me fat.”

    “You are fat,” says Evie.

    “Shut the fuck up!” yells Cordelia, jumping to her feet. She’s twice Evie’s size. “Say that again and I’ll fuckin’ batter you.”

    Guthrie has put himself between them. “Apologies, Evie.”

    Evie smiles sweetly. “I’m sorry for calling you fat, Cordelia. I think you’ve lost weight. You look positively svelte.”

    “What’s that mean?” she asks.

    “Skinny.”

    “Fuck off!”

    “OK, let’s all settle down,” says Guthrie. “Cordelia, why are you here?”

    “I grew up too soon,” she replies. “I lost my virginity at, like, eleven. I slept with guys and slept with girls and smoked a lot of pot. I tried heroin at twelve and ice when I was thirteen.”

    Evie rolls her eyes.

    Cordelia glares at her. “My mum called the police on me, so I tried to poison her with floor cleaner.”

    “To punish her?” asks Guthrie.

    “Maybe,” says Cordelia. “It was like an experiment, you know. I wanted to, like, see what would happen.”

    “Did it work?” asks Nat.

    “Nah,” replies Cordelia. “She said the soup tasted funny and didn’t finish the bowl. Made her vomit, that’s all.”

    “You should have used wolfsbane,” says Nat.

    “What’s that?”

    “It’s a plant. I heard about this gardener who died when he touched the leaves.”

    “My mum doesn’t like gardening,” says Cordelia, missing the point.

    Guthrie passes the teddy bear to Evie. “Your turn.”

    “Nope.”

    “Why not?”

    “The details of my life are inconsequential.”

    “That’s not true.”

    Evie sighs and leans forward, resting her forearms on her knees, squeezing the bear with both hands. Her accent changes.

    “My father was a relentlessly self-improving boulangerie owner from Belgium with low-grade narcolepsy and a penchant for buggery. My mother was a fifteen-year-old French prostitute named Chloe with webbed feet . . .”

    I laugh. Everybody looks at me.

    “It’s from Austin Powers,” I explain.

    More blank stares.

    “The movie . . . Mike Myers . . . Dr. Evil.”

    Still nothing.

    Evie puts on a gruff Scottish accent. “First things first. Where’s your shitter? I’ve got a turtle head poking out.”

    “Fat Bastard,” I say.

    Evie smiles. Guthrie is annoyed with me, as though I’m fomenting unrest.

    He calls on another teenager, who has a blue streak in her hair and piercings in her ears, eyebrows, and nose.

    “What brings you here, Serena?”

    “Well, it’s a long story.”

    Groans all round.

    Serena recounts an episode from her life when she went to America as an exchange student at sixteen and lived with a family in Ohio, whose son was in prison for murder. Every fortnight they insisted Serena visit him, making her wear her sexiest clothes. Short dresses. Low-cut tops.

    “He was on the other side of the glass and his father kept telling me to lean closer and show him my tits.”

    Evie sneezes into the crook of her arm in a short, sharp exhalation that sounds a lot like “Bullshit!”

    Serena glares at her but goes on with her story. “That night, when I was sleeping, the father came into my room and raped me. I was too frightened to tell my parents or call the police. I was alone in a foreign country, thousands of miles from home.” She looks around the group, hoping for sympathy.

    Evie sneezes again—making the same sound.

    Serena tries to ignore her.

    “Back home, I started having problems—drinking and cutting myself. My parents sent me to see a therapist, who seemed really nice at the beginning until he tried to rape me.”

    “For fuck’s sake!” says Evie, sighing in disgust.

    “We’re not here to pass judgment,” Guthrie warns her.

    “But she’s making shit up. What’s the point of sharing if people are gonna tell lies?”

    “Fuck you!” shouts Serena, flipping Evie the finger.

    “Bite me,” says Evie.

    Serena leaps to her feet. “You’re a freak! Everybody knows it.”

    “Please sit down,” says Guthrie, trying to keep the girls apart.

    “She called me a fucking liar,” whines Serena.

    “No, I didn’t,” says Evie. “I called you a psycho fucking liar.”

    Serena ducks under Guthrie’s arm and launches herself across the space, knocking Evie off her chair. The two of them are wrestling on the floor, but Evie seems to be laughing as she wards off the blows.

    An alarm has been raised and a security team bursts into the group therapy room, dragging Serena away. The rest of the teenagers are ordered back to their bedrooms, all except for Evie. Dusting herself off, she touches the corner of her lip, then rubs a smudge of blood between her thumb and forefinger.

    I give her a tissue. “Are you all right?”

    “I’m fine. She punches like a girl.”

    “What happened to your neck?”

    “Someone tried to strangle me.”

    “Why?”

    “I have that sort of face.”

    I pull up a chair and motion for Evie to sit down. She complies, crossing her legs, revealing an electronic tag on her ankle.

    “Why are you wearing that?”

    “They think I’m trying to escape.”

    “Are you?”

    Evie raises her forefinger to her lips and makes a shushing sound.

    “First chance I get.”

  • Reading Group Guide

    This reading group guide for Good Girl, Bad Girl includes an introduction, discussion questions, and ideas for enhancing your book club. The suggested questions are intended to help your reading group find new and interesting angles and topics for your discussion. We hope that these ideas will enrich your conversation and increase your enjoyment of the book.
    .
    Introduction

    From internationally bestselling author Michael Robotham, Good Girl, Bad Girl is a psychological thriller about a forensic psychologist caught between two cases—one girl who needs to be saved, and another who needs justice.

    A girl is discovered hiding in a secret room in the aftermath of a terrible crime. Half-starved and filthy, she won’t tell anyone her name, or her age, or where she came from. Maybe she is twelve, maybe fifteen. She doesn’t appear in any missing persons file, and her DNA can’t be matched to an identity. Six years later, still unidentified, she is living in a secure children’s home with a new name, Evie Cormac. When she initiates a court case demanding the right to be released as an adult, forensic psychologist Cyrus Haven must determine if Evie is ready to go free. But she is unlike anyone he’s ever met—fascinating and dangerous in equal measure. Evie knows when someone is lying, and no one around her is telling the truth.

    Meanwhile, Cyrus is called in to investigate the shocking murder of a high school figure-skating champion, Jodie Sheehan, who dies on a lonely footpath close to her home. Pretty and popular, Jodie is portrayed by everyone as the ultimate girl next door, but as Cyrus peels back the layers, a secret life emerges—one that Evie Cormac, the girl with no past, knows something about. A man haunted by his own tragic history, what price will Cyrus pay for the truth?

    Topics and Questions for Discussion

    1. Good Girl, Bad Girl opens with an epigraph from Oscar Wilde, “The truth is rarely pure and never simple.” After reading the novel, do you agree with this assessment?

    2. How did you feel about following two points of view throughout the entire novel? How does the Michael Robotham establish distinct voices for Cyrus and Evie/“Angel Face”? Why do you think he chose to use Angel Face as chapter titles, instead of Evie Cormac? Did this change how you viewed the character?

    3. Even though Cyrus says his doctoral thesis disproved the existence of “truth wizards,” do you think he still believes they exist? Is it possible that Evie is a truth wizard? Or is she just extraordinarily perceptive? If she is a truth wizard, do you think it’s a gift or a curse?

    4. Cyrus says that, because of his training, he refuses to “define people as being good or evil” (page 32). Do you think this is true? Do you think the title of the book undermines this idea by setting certain characters against one another as either good or bad?

    5. Cyrus wonders if “Evie remembers what happened to her or has chosen to forget” (page 99). Do you think Evie remembers her past and is choosing not to reveal the truth to Cyrus and others, or has she purposely forgotten the trauma as a coping mechanism? Would you consider her a liar if she were purposely concealing her memories? Why or why not?

    6. Both Evie and Cyrus are grappling with childhood trauma. Do you think their similar experiences are what draw Cyrus to Evie? How do you think his past impacted his relationship with her, both as her psychologist and her guardian?

    7. We all see people how we want them to be seen rather than acknowledging them for who they really are. Why do you think this is? How does this tendency to project our own expectations onto others create problems for the characters in the novel?

    8. Evie wonders why, “in a world full of suffering and sadness, why should anybody ‘accept their reality’ when they could change it?” (page 259). Do you think she accepts her reality by the end of the novel? Why or why not?

    9. How do the events in chapter 13, when Evie disarms Brodie at Langford Hall, foreshadow the events that transpire between her, Felicity Whitaker, and Cyrus?

    10. Throughout the novel, a number of characters conceal the truth or tell lies in order to protect other people, including Evie. She tells Cyrus that she won’t tell him her real name, because if she does, he’ll die, because that’s what happens to everyone she loves. Do you believe her? Do you think it’s ever okay to lie to someone?

    11. Discuss your reactions to the novel’s last chapter, where it’s revealed that Cyrus thinks he was wrong about Evie all along. Do you think there was some truth to the story people told about her? If not, why do you think Evie went along with the lie?

    Enhance Your Book Club

    1. Good Girl, Bad Girl is the second book in which Cyrus Haven appears as a character. Read The Secrets She Keeps and discuss Cyrus’s character development, from supporting character to protagonist.

    2. Sacha Hopewell, the officer who discovered “Angel Face,” fled the country after the attention the case drew. There are laws against revealing Evie Cormac’s identity as “Angel Face.” When Cyrus recalls the details of the case, he recalls real-life cases of kidnapped girls, including Elizabeth Smart and Jaycee Dugard. Research media coverage and reactions to these cases online. How does it compare to the fictional aftermath in the novel?

    Customer Reviews

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    Good Girl, Bad Girl: A Novel 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
    ShihTzuMama 9 months ago
    This should be at the top of the list for anyone looking for their next binge read. Michael Robotham constructs a narrative that gives readers a look at what happens when the ghosts of the past return to haunt the lives of those living in the present. GOOD GIRL, BAD GIRL swirls through startling plot twists as seen through the duo perspectives of forensic psychologist Cyrus Haven and Evie Cormac, a teen aged girl who possesses a unique talent and whose past is a giant question mark. By opening doors into the dark secrets lurking in his characters’ pasts, Robotham manages to keep the reader enthralled in this symbiotic relationship. When an up and coming figure skater, Jodie Sheehan, is found murdered Haven is called upon to assist in catching the killer, and while fingers point in multiple directions, it is difficult to discern which direction is the right one. Possessing a talent for crafting individuals who often make questionable decisions, Robotham manages to make us care about these people, some because they have been wronged and are attempting to cope with the hand life has dealt them and others whose motives are hidden below the surface and therefore not readily apparent. The book’s finale leaves enough questions unanswered to guarantee a second foray into the lives of Cyrus and Evie. I look forward to it.
    Bridgett Deem Nelson 5 months ago
    2.5 stars rounded up So... I honestly don't know how I feel about this novel. The writing is decent and the story line had tons of potential...but it was pretty far-fetched. To the point I didn't really feel like picking it up to read. I usually read 3 to 4 books each week. This one, unfortunately, took me an entire week to get through, and now my schedule is completely screwed. Meh. The Good --Most of the characters were beautifully fleshed out, particularly Cyrus and Evie. --The plot was intriguing, but needs tweaking to make it great. --Poppy the rescue dog --There were some decent red herrings. Although I guessed most of the twists fairly early on, there were a couple surprises, which pleased me. The Bad --Yes, Cyrus was a psychologist working as a police consultant. That doesn't give him the authority to go around to various suspects, divulging intimate details about the case, and upsetting everything. For a psychologist, he was about as subtle as a bull in a China shop. --Without giving too much away, Cyrus's situation with Evie was so highly implausible, it was laughable. --Yes, indeed...it was a multi-layered plot. However, there were almost too many story lines. It seemed chaotic. --Evie's innate "lie detection radar" was just silly. The Ugly --There was so much left unanswered, particularly regarding Evie. Clearly, this is going to be a series of books. I wish I had known that going in. Thanks to the publisher for providing an advanced copy.
    amandainpa 6 months ago
    This thriller was fun because it had 2 mysteries. The reader follows a psychologist who is helping to solve the crime of a murdered teenage ice skater. He also comes comes into contact with a girl with a traumatizing past. The story kept me guessing and I was surprised by the ending. Although this wasn't a particularly memorable or unputdownable thriller, I still enjoyed the journey. It felt a bit long and drawn out at times and some parts seemed a bit too convenient and unrealistic. Overall, a solid thriller worth reading. I received an arc of this book from NetGalley to review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
    tschnitzler 6 months ago
    This book has the makings of a very good sequel. The conclusion is left open for more of the continuing story between our main characters Cyrus Haven and Evie Cormac. Good Girl, Bad Girl also leaves the question of which girl was actually the good girl and which girl is the bad girl. Evie's past is full of abuse, abandonment, and tragedy. The on-going investigation is about teenager Jodie Sheehan who has been murdered. Both girls are bad, and both girls are good girls. Many suspenseful parts of this book that keep you on edge, and it's not always happily ever after.
    lsmoore_43 7 months ago
    I absolutely loved this book. It had all the things that keep me turning pages. This is my first book by this author and will definitely not be my last. The way he writes is spot on and the characters come to life for me. It was a quick read for me as I could not hardly put it down. I loved it. I can’t wait for the next book A huge 4.5 stars and a high recommendation. Thank you to #NetGalley for this book for my honest review.
    Anonymous 8 months ago
    Evie Cormac is being observed by Adam Guthrie at Langford Hall, a high-security children’s home in Nottingham. Adam has brought Cyrus Haven with him today. Cyrus is a psychologist. The room has a number of young girls with severe psychological problems. Evie is known as Angel Face. or the Girl in the Box. When she was found some years ago in a secret room, no one knew who she was or even how old she was. Tests done on her revealed nothing and she was made a ward of the court. Evie is smart, sassy, and can hold her own in a conversation or confrontation. Cyrus is taken with the young woman and truly wants to help her. Cyrus has now been summoned by the police to help investigate the body of a woman they have just found. Cyrus’s friend, Lenny. is a police officer and had requested that Cyrus help with the investigation. Years ago, Cyrus’s brother murdered their parents and twin sisters. Now, a young teen who had gone missing has been found murdered and sexually assaulted. She was an up and coming champion skater. When her body is found, questions arise as there appears to have been more than one person involved with her death. This is a book that incorporates two cases. I found that Evie is capable of some good, snarky humor, but I found it a bit hard to believe that she is as intelligent as she is supposed to be. All and all a pretty good mystery but not a favorite. Copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
    Anonymous 8 months ago
    A unique story line with a central character, a psychiatrist, who has been asked to investigate two differing situations. A young woman with a horrific background but no identification who must be evaluated to verify if she can live in society. A young woman with an extensive community background and a promising future is found murdered in compromising circumstances. Michael Robotham has developed the characters so you feel as if they are your neighbors and you're shocked when you read their stories in the paper! You have an immediate interest in the outcome and just can't believe it when you figure out which one is the good girl and which one is the bad girl!
    Twink 8 months ago
    Michael Robotham is firmly on my 'must read' list. I've read all of the Joe O'Loughlin series. I've got the feeling that this series might be winding down. But, I'm pretty happy with Good Girl, Bad Girl - the first in a new series featuring forensic psychologist Cyrus Haven. Haven is a great lead character - intelligent, driven but wounded, with darkness in his own background. He works with the police department, but isn't fully accepted. I appreciate a flawed lead as I find I bond more with the character. I enjoyed his fractious relationship with DCI Lenny Parvel. She's gruff and tough and is also part of Haven's past. When a teen skating star is discovered murdered on a lonely footpath, Cyrus is called in to assist. His interviews and probing uncover a life that doesn't match her 'good girl' reputation. And there are more than a few suspects for whodunit. He's also called in to assess a teen girl (the 'bad girl' of the title) who wants to be released from the group home setting she lives in as she says she is eighteen. Says? Uh, huh no one truly knows how old she is. Evie Cormac (a name given to her) was discovered in a hidden room at a violent crime scene. The man who was holding her is dead - unable to provide answers. And Evie herself - she either doesn't know or won't tell. As the book progressed there are small references that only begin to hint at her past. And Haven is the only person she seems to actually like. Why? Because he tells the truth. And Evie can uncannily tell when someone is lying. It's hard to read Evie's story and the reader will be firmly on her side, despite her attempts to alienate everyone who crosses her path. Who can blame her? This first book is the beginning of (hopefully) a firmer relationship between Cyrus and Evie. So good on so many levels. Robotham's books are easy to get lost in for hours at a time - addictive listening/reading at its best. Getting to know these new players intrigued me as did the search for the murderer. The tension in Good Girl, Bad Girl just never lets up. The final whodunit wasn't who I expected and there's a nice little twist in the last few chapters. And those last chapters are action packed as well. Kudos to Robotham for coming up with this premise and these two leads. I will be eagerly awaiting the next book in this series. Another excellent listen/read from Robotham - but hey, I knew it would be. An easy five star book. I did choose to listen to Good Girl, Bad Girl. And that choice was made based on the reader - Joe Jameson. His voice is rich and full. His speaking voice is clear and easy to understand. He created distinctive voices for each character, making it easy to know who was speaking. And those unique voice created much clearer mental images for me. He interprets the book well and uses his voice effectively for the emotions and action as they play out. I've said it before and I'll say it again - I find myself more drawn into a book when I listen to it (and it's often harder leave)!
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    I read the synopsis of this book and was very excited to read it. It definitely had some good crime elements and was essentially two stories in one. The story of Jodie who was found murdered, and the story of Evie who was found living in feral conditions and has been living in a psychiatric hospital for the past 6 years. Cyrus investigates Jodie's death and pieces things together with Evie, the teen he has taken into his home to foster. I really liked the two perspective story telling and felt the story had a strong and intriguing beginning that hooked me right away. Some parts were a little slower, specifically around Cyrus gathering evidence for Jodie's murder, but it did not hinder my interest in continuing to read. I enjoyed the ending!
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    I read the synopsis of this book and was very excited to read it. It definitely had some good crime elements and was essentially two stories in one. The story of Jodie who was found murdered, and the story of Evie who was found living in feral conditions and has been living in a psychiatric hospital for the past 6 years. Cyrus investigates Jodie's death and pieces things together with Evie, the teen he has taken into his home to foster. I really liked the two perspective story telling and felt the story had a strong and intriguing beginning that hooked me right away. Some parts were a little slower, specifically around Cyrus gathering evidence for Jodie's murder, but it did not hinder my interest in continuing to read. I enjoyed the ending!
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    I read the synopsis of this book and was very excited to read it. It definitely had some good crime elements and was essentially two stories in one. The story of Jodie who was found murdered, and the story of Evie who was found living in feral conditions and has been living in a psychiatric hospital for the past 6 years. Cyrus investigates Jodie's death and pieces things together with Evie, the teen he has taken into his home to foster. I really liked the two perspective story telling and felt the story had a strong and intriguing beginning that hooked me right away. Some parts were a little slower, specifically around Cyrus gathering evidence for Jodie's murder, but it did not hinder my interest in continuing to read. I enjoyed the ending!
    LuvSnoop42 9 months ago
    It's always cool when I read a new (to me) author, love it and learn that he has others! Such is the case with Michael Robotham's latest. I loved Cyrus and Evie. Both are extremely damaged from their pasts and Cyrus is trying to earn Evie's trust. Evie has the uncanny ability to tell if someone is lying. Cyrus is also looking into the murder of a popular high-school student and her story will soon intersect with Evie's. This was a very emotional book as we learn more and more about both Evie and Cyrus. One scene had me ugly crying, as it was so happy and sad! I was a little disappointed in the end, as I had so many unanswered questions. I still gave it 5 stars as it appears that there will be more books with these characters and hopefully I will learn more. I hope so! In the meantime, I will catch up on this author! Thank you to NetGalley, Michael Robotham and Scribner for this ARC!
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    Fast read. Left me wanting more.
    BigReader7860 9 months ago
    I loved this book. Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me to read and review it. Mr. Robotham is a terrific writer. His characters are very believable. This is about a teenaged girl’s murder and the entire book follows that murder. I can usually guess “whodunnits “ but not this one. I feel most readers of thrillers and mysteries would greatly enjoy it!
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    A great psychological thriller that is good any time of the year but is perfect for the summer. The verbal repartee that flows between Cyrus and his charge Evie is perfectly nuanced and logically illogical when it comes to human emotions and the abuse that she had endured. I found myself rooting for her despite her ugly actions and reactions as we found ourselves unpeeling the layers of the onion to examine the inner core of her being.She became, for me, a likable and sympathetic character in the end. The story focuses on Cyrus, a psychologist who allows Evie to live with him when she truly wants to leave her secure childrens' home, and discover what freedom is after being boarded up and abused most of her life. Concomitantly he is trying to solve the murder of a teenage ice skater whose murder has a lot of question marks attached to it. No one but Cyrus knows that Evie has a gift of being able to ascertain when someone is telling the truth but that skill helps him in his search for the truth. Along the way, both get into skirmishes as they search, winding up with an ending that is soaked in realism.
    Renwarsreads 9 months ago
    I really liked this book. It was different from the usual thrillers. I liked the characters and really enjoyed the writing style. I felt like I read this one really quickly, I just wanted to keep going to find out how it ended. I will definitely look for Cyrus Haven #2!!
    labmom55 9 months ago
    Cyrus Haven is a forensic psychologist tasked with determining whether a young woman can safely be released from care. Evie Cormac was the victim of years of being held captive and sexually abused. Once discovered, the authorities could find no trace of her past. And she’s never said. Meanwhile, he’s also helping an investigation into the death of a young girl, a Junior Ice Skating Champion. The book is extremely well written. It’s not often I highlight phrases in a mystery, but I found myself doing it here. I loved Cyrus’ take on evil, the difference between chance and luck. I love his explanation for why he went into psychology. We hear from both Cyrus’ and Evie’s POV. When the two are together, the volleys fly back and forth, each trying to suss the other out. Evie has the gift of being able to tell when someone is lying. As would be expected, she has major trust issues and lies regularly. But I loved that she kept two Alsatians alive for weeks after the death of their owner, her capturer. I was drawn into this book and it kept me enthralled. Before I knew it, I had read the entire book in just over a day. There were lots of twists and turns and a strong ending. I’m actually hoping that Robotham develops this into a series with Evie and Cyrus. My thanks to netgalley and Scribner for an advance copy of this book.
    Alfoster 9 months ago
    I love Robotham's books as they are always multi-layered and laced with psychological insights that keep me up long into the night. This one revolves around Evie, a tortured young woman in a juvenile detention center and Cyrus, the psychologist attempting to help her. Throw into the mix a young girl found murdered who appears to be a normal teen but is harboring secrets of her own. Cyrus is in the middle of both cases but little does he realize that Evie--although trying to work through her own issues--senses when people are lying and can actually help him with the murder. Of course all of the characters are flawed and that's what makes this novel so addictive because it highlights the human condition. I do hope there is a sequel as the story of Cyrus and Evie is not over and readers need to see more of them! Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC!
    CrystalKL 9 months ago
    Thank you to NetGalley and Publisher for allowing me to read an ARC of Good Girl, Bad Girl in trade for my honest review. This is not my first time reading a book by Michael Robotham, he has become one of my favorite authors. With that being said this book fell a little short for me. It's not that I didn't enjoy it because I did. I felt myself wanting to hear more of Angel Face's story and not really caring about what was going on with the other characters. I did like the twist at the end I didn't see it coming exactly like that. I do wish there was more story about Angel Face at the end. Another Book? I can only hope! Did I enjoy this book? Yes Would I recommend it to a friend? Yes.
    DressedToRead 9 months ago
    A multi-layered plot with fascinating characters. The latest from Micheal Robotham is a crime/police-procedural story that introduces Cyrus Haven, a psychologist with a disturbing and heart-breaking past. The camaraderie between Cyrus and his patient added sentiment. The writing is compelling and the crimes are gritty. The characters are all flawed and mysterious. There are many surprises and a character with a special gift that she calls a curse. This one kept me guessing and page turning to find out the who, the why, and the how. The two cases that Cyrus is dealing with, come together in an explosive ending. Recommend to fans of crime fiction that enjoy a gritty subplot. This one is out on July 23,2019
    diane92345 10 months ago
    Good Girl, Bad Girl? Which one is Evie? Evie is known in the press as Angel Face. As a young girl, she is found in a hidden room with a man long dead after being tortured. Evie claims to not remember anything from her former life—not even her name or age. Cyrus is a police psychologist. He is also the survivor of the brutal murder of his family by his older brother. He volunteers to help Evie get out of her group home. In the meantime, Cyrus is working the case of a young ice skater, assaulted and killed on a dark public path on Guy Fawkes Night. A slow simmer of a novel, Good Girl, Bad Girl has a multitude of plot threads. All are expertly wound up by the conclusion. Both Cyrus and Evie are unusual characters that you want the best for but fear the worst. The thrilling ending is the best of 2019 so far. 4 stars! Thanks to Scribner and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
    JulieB 10 months ago
    Wow...where to begin! This thriller has one eye-popping and complicated storyline! But considering there are so many different threads unfolding, the author does a great job. I was never confused. Now for the negative. I was left with numerous questions! I’m not a fan of series, but I’ll have to send hate mail to the amazing Mr. Robotham if he does not write another book about Evie and Cyrus and fill in the missing details!! Evie is sassy, funny, smart, resilient, resourceful and uniquely lovable! She is wildly impressive and very scary, at the same time. Her true age is unknown. What little is known about her background is horrendous and she either doesn’t remember the rest, or refuses to talk about it. She’s suspected to be a truth wizard aka human lie detector, which I found fascinating. Cyrus is a forensic psychologist with his own tragic past. He’s called in to evaluate Evie, after she requests release from the secure children’s home where she resides. They form a very unique and interesting relationship. He understands her like no one else, so his treatment of her is different, which throws Evie off her game a bit. The banter between the two is hilarious. I spent nine long days reading this well-written and original book. Not because the book was slow! We had out-of-town visitors and all I could think about was sneaking off to read. This is my first novel by this author, so I can’t compare it to his previous work. But this book was suspenseful and dark. The flawed characters are wonderful and fascinating! Another great author added to by TBR list. Anyone who hasn’t read this author is missing out. My Rating: 4.5 ⭐️’s This would be 5 stars if it weren’t for the unanswered questions. Published: July 23rd 2019 by Scribner Pages: 352 Recommend: Yes Thank you to NetGalley, Edelweiss, Scribner and Michael Robotham for this ARC, in exchange for my honest opinion!
    Zach_B 10 months ago
    Good Girl, Bad Girl by Michael Robotham is a fantastic thriller. Cyrus Haven is a psychotherapist who works with the police. He’s currently working with Evie Cormac, a young woman who was found hiding in a secret room with no name, no parents, no biographical info. He’s also working the murder of figure-skater Jodie Sheehan, who was found in the woods near her home. Evie has a gift, she is a “lie detector”, a person who can tell instinctively when someone is telling the truth. As Cyrus works more closely with Evie, he begins to feel protective of her, ultimately taking her into his home as his foster child. Meanwhile, the murder mystery of Jodie takes many, many twists and turns. This golden girl from a good family isn’t who she appears to be and there are family secrets to be revealed. I really enjoyed this story. It kept me guessing until the end and I didn’t guess who did it. I will read more from Mr. Robotham in the future. Thank you to the publisher for the advanced e-Copy of this book for an honest review. #netgalley #goodgirlbadgirl
    Kaceeey 10 months ago
    Can I please hand out 6 shiny stars? Because Michael Robotham has done it again! Lately, thrillers have been hit or miss for me. Maybe more miss. Well thriller fans, let me inform you, this was that perfect thriller that I’ve been searching for all year! Straight to my favorite shelf! Evie Cormac is a young girl who’s been a ward of the court for years. With a hidden past, she has no proof of her real name, birthday, parents or even where she’s from. When she petitions the system to release her as an adult claiming to be eighteen, the court has other ideas. Psychologist Cyrus Haven agrees to assume responsibility for her as her foster parent. Maybe this will buy her him time to unlock some of Evie's secrets. Michael Robotham has a gift for writing the most ingenious, captivating thrillers, guaranteed to hold your undivided attention as you binge read right to the end. I cannot believe how quickly I flew through this book. Loving every minute of it. The ending.... well all I can say is I was left with chills running down my arms! Wow! I highly recommend this latest stand-alone from Michael Robotham to all thriller fans! A buddy read with Susanne that left us both speechless at the end! Thank you to NetGalley, Edelweiss, Simon and Schuster - Scribner and Michael Robotham for an ARC to read and review.
    Aqswr 10 months ago
    Author Michael Robotham has written a twisty mystery with two protagonists whose backstories rival one another in darkness. Cyrus Haven, our hero, appears to be the man at the helm of a series the author has in mind, a psychologist whose past won’t disappear quietly. He attempts to assist Evie, a teen survivor of unknown origin, and oddly enough together they unravel a murder. Their partnership has just a little bit of THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO vibe about it. The tale itself is juicy and enveloping. I didn’t want to stop reading and plenty of sections were intriguing enough that I paused to consider them further. So, not your standard read-as-fast-as-you-can mystery. This book was worth savoring while reading; the author had thoughts to share and they were worth reflecting a bit. Plus, great ending, what more could I ask for? This is a great book and I can’t wait to read the next one. I received my copy from the publisher though NetGalley. Many thanks, I loved it!