The Golden Sayings of Epictetus

The Golden Sayings of Epictetus

by Epictetus

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Overview

Epictetus was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was probably born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia (present day Pamukkale, Turkey), and lived in Rome until his exile to Nicopolis in northwestern Greece, where he lived most of his life and died. His teachings were noted down and published by his pupil Arrian in his Discourses. Philosophy, he taught, is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. To Epictetus, all external events are determined by fate, and are thus beyond our control, but we can accept whatever happens calmly and dispassionately. Individuals, however, are responsible for their own actions which they can examine and control through rigorous self-discipline. Suffering arises from trying to control what is uncontrollable, or from neglecting what is within our power. As part of the universal city that is the universe, human beings have a duty of care to all fellow humans. The person who followed these precepts would achieve happiness.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781329784079
Publisher: Lulu.com
Publication date: 12/23/2015
Pages: 66
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.31(d)

About the Author

Epictetus (c. 50 - 135 AD) was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia (present day Pamukkale, Turkey) and lived in Rome until his banishment, when he went to Nicopolis in northwestern Greece for the rest of his life. His teachings were written down and published by his pupil Arrian in his Discourses and Enchiridion.
Epictetus taught that philosophy is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. To Epictetus, all external events are beyond our control; we should accept calmly and dispassionately whatever happens. However, individuals are responsible for their own actions, which they can examine and control through rigorous self-discipline.
Epictetus was born AD 50,[2][3] presumably at Hierapolis, Phrygia.[4] The name his parents gave him is unknown; the word epíktētos (ἐπίκτητος) in Greek simply means "gained" or "acquired";[5] the Greek philosopher Plato, in his Laws, uses the term as property that is "added to one's hereditary property".[6] He spent his youth as a slave in Rome to Epaphroditos, a wealthy freedman and secretary to Nero.[7]
Early in life, Epictetus acquired a passion for philosophy and, with the permission of his wealthy owner, he studied Stoic philosophy under Musonius Rufus,[8] which allowed him to rise in respectability as he grew more educated.[9] Somehow, he became crippled. Origen stated that his leg was deliberately broken by his master.[10] Simplicius stated that he had been lame from childhood
Epictetus obtained his freedom sometime after the death of Nero in 68 A.D.,[12] and he began to teach philosophy in Rome. About 93 A.D. Emperor Domitian banished all philosophers from the city,[13] and Epictetus went to Nicopolis in Epirus, Greece, where he founded a philosophical school.[14]
His most famous pupil, Arrian, studied under him when a young man (ca. AD 108) and claimed to have written the famous Discourses from his lecture notes, which he argued should be considered comparable to the Socratic literature.[15] Arrian describes Epictetus as being a powerful speaker who could "induce his listener to feel just what Epictetus wanted him to feel."[16] Many eminent figures sought conversations with him.[17] Emperor Hadrian was friendly with him,[18] and may have listened to him speak at his school in Nicopolis

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