George's Secret Key to the Universe (George's Secret Key Series #1) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

George's Secret Key to the Universe (George's Secret Key Series #1) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

by Lucy Hawking, Stephen Hawking

Hardcover(Library Binding - THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY)

$24.26 $26.95 Save 10% Current price is $24.26, Original price is $26.95. You Save 10%. View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, December 19

Overview

George's parents, who have always been wary of technology, warn him about their new neighbors. But when George befriends them he finds himself on a wildly fun adventure, while learning about physics, time, and the universe.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780606373753
Publisher: Turtleback Books
Publication date: 05/19/2009
Series: George's Secret Key Series , #1
Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 882,796
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

George's Secret Key to the Universe 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
avalonpriestess More than 1 year ago
This book was recommended by Lucas' 5th grade science teacher. I'm glad I read it. (I used to try to convince myself that I must read his books to be certain they contain nothing objectionable, now I just admit I love kids books) The first few chapters were very slow moving. They set up the characters of the story. George is a child of two organic loving, technology hating "save the Earth" parents. They shun technology to the point where they use candles instead of light bulbs! Eric, the scientist neighbor who loves to teach. Annie, Eric's annoying but lovable daughter. Mr. G. Reeper (known as Greeper to his students) the science teacher in George's school, Greeper is the villain of the story..OK- you knew there had to be a villain, right? And let's not forget COSMOS, the most amazing computer in the universe. COSMOS, a talking computer with an attitude, reminded me of HAL from Space Odyssey, 2001. The book told a story of saving the planet and/or searching for other habitable planets. Should we work together to do both? Can technology be a good thing if used correctly? This book is full of fun scientific information. There are footnotes about the planets, comets, asteroids, matter, black holes and many other astronomical objects. The illustrations that accompany the story are wonderful, courtesy of Garry Parsons. There are several color photos of planets, black holes, comets and other things discussed in the book. Kids learn about astronomy without realizing they are learning!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great (and funny) way to teach science to kids (and adults, too). The illustrations are great! If you are not a science lover, no problem: just have fun!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent family read-aloud and share book. Plenty of information for discussion.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book at my library for 2 freaking dollars!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AMAZING
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My eight-year old tends to stick to what he knows, and would be reading "easy" books forever. I love physics, and bought this book because of the glowing reviews. Well, it lived up to them! He's already read both books and is anxiously awaiting the promised third book.
mandochild on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I was actually a little disappointed with this one, but then, I was being rather naive. Not ever having been brave enough to attempt A brief history of time I think I was looking to see some of Hawking's brilliance through a children's novel. But of course, it wasn't like that at all. In fact, it was too young and the plot too implausible for me to enjoy it properly - I was itching for something more intelligent (which doesn't happen to me very often!).Having said that, the storyline was engagingly written and the characters generally likeable. And as it built towards the climax, I genuinely did want to know what happened. I think that if the book had been aimed at an older audience, with a more plausible plotline, it would have been a really good book. But as it is, I'm not sure I'll be too worried about getting the sequel. Maybe I'll have to get brave in the library some day or see if I can find a suitable e or audio version of Hawking's "real" work...
ljldml on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was recommended by Lucas' 5th grade science teacher. I'm glad I read it. (I used to try to convince myself that I must read his books to be certain they contain nothing objectionable, now I just admit I love kids books) The first few chapters were very slow moving. They set up the characters of the story. George is a child of two organic loving, technology hating "save the Earth" parents. They shun technology to the point where they use candles instead of light bulbs! Eric, the scientist neighbor who loves to teach. Annie, Eric's annoying but lovable daughter. Mr. G. Reeper (known as Greeper to his students) the science teacher in George's school, Greeper is the villain of the story..OK- you knew there had to be a villain, right? And let's not forget COSMOS, the most amazing computer in the universe. COSMOS, a talking computer with an attitude, reminded me of HAL from Space Odyssey, 2001.The book told a story of saving the planet and/or searching for other habitable planets. Should we work together to do both? Can technology be a good thing if used correctly?This book is full of fun scientific information. There are footnotes about the planets, comets, asteroids, matter, black holes and many other astronomical objects. The illustrations that accompany the story are wonderful, courtesy of Garry Parsons. There are several color photos of planets, black holes, comets and other things discussed in the book. Kids learn about astronomy without realizing they are learning! Don't forget to check out the webpage georgessecretkey.com
Zacswic on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I love it because cosmos opened a door to the universe
DavidDunkerton on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
George's Secret Key to the Universe is written at a younger reading level, but I think teens would still enjoy it because it has an interesting story and there are several fascinating and beautiful pictures and facts inserted. Stephen Hawking is a well-known genius and the authority on the theory of black holes, and just the fact that he had input in a children¿s novel gives it some instant appeal!George¿s parents are very concerned about the environment, so they do not use much electricity in their home, they do not drive cars, and they only eat organic vegetables. George really wants a computer, but his parents refuse to get one for him because they believe technology is destroying the world.George found out that his neighbor owned Cosmos, the most amazing computer in the world. This computer could transport you into outer space, and George learned a lot about the universe, including comets and our solar system. When someone else found out about Cosmos, though, things got dangerous!
BiblioKleptoManiac on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Follows the adventures of a young boy and his neighbor friend as they travel through a computer portal into outer space, where they explore such mysteries as black holes and the origins of the universe, while trying to evade an evil scientist.
kewpie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book will teach the budding elementary school aged geek some of the newest theories about black holes. It will teach adults about Stephen Hawking's playful mind and sense of humor. This book was written for those pre-geek second and third graders who read all the astronomy books in the j520 section of the library and then pester their parents, teachers and school librarians about the big bang, black holes, comets and life on other planets. I've done stints in elementary school libraries and there are plenty of these kids. Perhaps some adults may think the story is too young for the science presented -- but I bet these adults haven't worked in school libraries. They don't know about the one "weird kid" who seems to be in almost every second and third grade class in every school in the nation who craves to know the inner workings of the universe and is frustrated that most adults they encounter don't seem to know or care about the questions they have.My cousin and I were those "weird kids" in our classes. We were mad about science and played "Let's Pretend" long after the other kids our age quit. I can totally imagine him and I pretending that we had an amazing computer that zoomed us out into space and allowed us to ride a comet around the solar system. And in reality, I remember us pretending that we were falling into a black hole at some point. When I read this book, I felt as if I were eight years old again. I would have LOVED this book. It would have been next to the "Brown Paper School Book" series that I treasured. I felt like I was snooping in on someone else's "Let's Pretend" game.
aedwards92 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I bought this for my 6 year old son who has a terrific imagination and loves science. I read a chapter a night to him over the course of a month. He loved the story and the quality time we spent together. The basic idea of the book is a boy, George, makes friends with a girl, Annie, and her scientist father Eric. Eric has created the smartest computer in the world, Cosmos. Cosmos is able to open windows to galaxy where Annie, Eric, and George can explore. During the story they run into the books villian, Dr. Reaper, who steals Cosmos to use it for his own personal gain instead of scientific advancement.I really like how the book incorporates current scientific theories in a manner a young child can be interested in. There were a few points that I wasn't thrilled about, for example, the idea that the villian was a teacher or that Erics parents were anti-technology.However, the book has sparked a tremendous interest in space and science in my son and that alone makes the book worth it.
aangela1010 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Really great. Helped me understand all that sciency-stuff I never understood. I hope there will be more of them.
MikeFarquhar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
George's Secret Key to the Universe by Lucy Hawking, aided and abetted by her father Stephen, is a slightly odd hybrid of textbook and kids' adventure story. George has eco-warrior type parents who regularly take part in protest marches, believe science is dangerous, and - to his frustration - don't allow things like TVs or computers in the house. When mysterious new neighbours move in next door, George discovers a key to an entirely new world of scientific wonder, and ends up being catapulted into adventure.This is a decent enough kids' story, but its tone is slightly oddly placed - it veers between trying for advenure/thriller, but regularly segues into slightly preachy, worthy and patronising asides on how Science is Pure Dead Brilliant So It Is, as well as the occasional fact/textbook like page thrown in for good measure. While I have no problem at all with the message, it was all presented a bit too worthily for my liking - however, I think there's every chance the 6-7 year old me would probably have eaten it up. Be interesting to see how it is received and whether having the Hawking name attached to it makes a significant difference to its reception. This is intended as the first in a trilogy, with presumably the later two books covering other aspects of science (this one is predominantly astronomy/cosmology)(There's a great bit where the whole plot hinges on the revelation that black holes emit Hawking Radiation, and the self-referential smugness of the authors almost makes the book implode in on itself)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go george!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Oh my goodness! I got this book when i was in 5th grade. I love it!!!!!!!!!!! Its amazing!!!!! I cannot wait to buy the thrird one and I hope its just as good as the first two! Its an great read for anyone who likes a good no great book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A very entertaining book that makes you learn things without realizing that you are. Very creative and imaginative. For any age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The main point I am trying to make is that i think this book is great for students who love science and learning new things. I think that a kid should be aloud to read anything they want to i just recommend this book for one of my favorites.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chad Mickelson More than 1 year ago
I tore through it reading every chance I got. That a 5 star book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago