Feminist Ethics and Natural Law; The End of the Anathemas

Feminist Ethics and Natural Law; The End of the Anathemas

by Cristina L. H. Traina

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Overview

Heated debates over such issues as abortiion, contraception, ordination, and Church heirarchy suggest that feminist and natural law ethics are diametrically opposed. Cristina L. H. Traina now reexamines both Roman Catholic natural law tradition and Anglo-American feminist ethics and reconciles the two positions by showing how some of their aims and assumptions complement one another. After carefully scrutinizing Aquinas's moral theology and analyzing trends in both contemporary feminist ethics and twentieth-century Roman Catholic theology, Traina shows that a truly Thomistic natural law ethic provides a much needed holistic foundation for contemporary feminist ethics. She proposes an innovative union of two supposedly antagonistic schools of thought, a new feminist natural law that would yeild more comprehensive moral analysis than either existing tradition alone.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780878407279
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
Publication date: 04/28/1999
Series: Moral Traditions and Moral Arguments Series
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 400
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 9.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Cristina L. H. Traina is an assistant professor of religion at Northwestern University. She received a PhD in theology from the University of Chicago Divinity School.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"The interpretation of both the Roman Catholic natural law tradition and Anglo-American feminist ethics is sharp and illuminating. The aim of the whole offers a creative contribution to both traditions and an interesting perspective on the specific authors." -- Margaret A. Farley, Gilbert L. Stark Professor of Christian Ethics, Yale University Divinity School

Margaret A. Farley

The interpretation of both the Roman Catholic natural law tradition and Anglo-American feminist ethics is sharp and illuminating. The aim of the whole offers a creative contribution to both traditions and an interesting perspective on the specific authors.

Customer Reviews