The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

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Overview

'A nation without a national government is an awful spectacle.' In the winter of 1787-8 a series of eighty-five essays appeared in the New York press; the purpose of the essays was to persuade the citizens of New York State to ratify the Constitution of the United States. The three authors - Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay - were respectively the first Secretary of the Treasury, the fourth President, and the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in American history. Each had played a crucial role in the events of the American Revolution; together they were convinced of the need to weld thirteen disparate and newly-independent states into a union. Their essays make the case for a new and united nation, governed under a written Constitution that endures to this day. The Federalist Papers are an indispensable guide to the intentions of the founding fathers who created the United States, and a canonical text in the development of western political thought. This new edition pays full attention to the classical learning of their authors and the historical examples they deploy. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780191604782
Publisher: OUP Oxford
Publication date: 10/09/2008
Series: Oxford World's Classics Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Lawrence Goldman is editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and he has published widely on nineteenth- and twentieth-century British History, including Britain's social and political relations with the United States.

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The Federalist No. 1: Hamilton
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Federalist Papers"
by .
Copyright © 2012 Alexander Hamilton.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Table of Contents

Contents
Preface
No. 1: General Introduction
No. 2: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
No. 3: The Same Subject Continued
No. 4: The Same Subject Continued
No. 5: The Same Subject Continued
No. 6: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
No. 7: The Same Subject Continued
No. 8: The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States
No. 9: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
No. 10: The Same Subject Continued
No. 11: The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy
No. 12: The Utility of the Union in Respect to Revenue
No. 13: Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government
No. 14: Objections to the Proposed Constitution from Extent of Territory Answered
No. 15: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
No. 16: The Same Subject Continued
No. 17: The Same Subject Continued
No. 18: The Same Subject Continued
No. 19: The Same Subject Continued
No. 20: The Same Subject Continued
No. 21: Other Defects of the Present Confederation
No. 22: The Same Subject Continued
No. 23: The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union
No. 24: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
No. 25: The Same Subject Continued
No. 26: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defence Considered
No. 27: The Same Subject Continued
No. 28: The Same Subject Continued
No. 29: Concerning the Militia
No. 30: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
No. 31: The Same Subject Continued
No. 32: The Same Subject Continued
No. 33: The Same Subject Continued
No. 34: The Same Subject Continued
No. 35: The Same Subject Continued
No. 36: The Same Subject Continued
No. 37: Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government
No. 38: The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed
No. 39: The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles
No. 40: The Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained
No. 41: General View of the Powers Conferred by the Constitution
No. 42: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
No. 43: The Same Subject Continued
No. 44: Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States
No. 45: The Alleged Danger from the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered
No. 46: The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared
No. 47: The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts
No. 48: These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control over Each Other
No. 49: Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention
No. 50: Periodical Appeals to the People Considered
No. 51: The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments
No. 52: The House of Representatives
No. 53: The Same Subject Continued
No. 54: The Apportionment of Members Among the States
No. 55: The Total Number of the House of Representatives
No. 56: The Same Subject Continued
No. 57: The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation
No. 58: Objection That the Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands, Considered
No. 59: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
No. 60: The Same Subject Continued
No. 61: The Same Subject Continued
No. 62: The Senate
No. 63: The Senate Continued
No. 64: The Powers of the Senate
No. 65: The Powers of the Senate Continued
No. 66: Objections to the Power of the Senate to Sit as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered
No. 67: The Executive Department
No. 68: The Mode of Electing the President
No. 69: The Real Character of the Executive
No. 70: The Executive Department Further Considered
No. 71: The Duration in Office of the Executive
No. 72: The Same Subject Continued, and Re-eligibility of the Executive Considered
No. 73: The Provision for the Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power
No. 74: The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive
No. 75: The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive
No. 76: The Appointing Power of the Executive
No. 77: The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered
No. 78: The Judiciary Department
No. 79: The Judiciary Continued
No. 80: The Powers of the Judiciary
No. 81: The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judiciary Authority
No. 82: The Judiciary Continued
No. 83: The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury
No. 84: Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
No. 85: Concluding Remarks
 

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