FAIRY TALES FROM THE SWEDISH

FAIRY TALES FROM THE SWEDISH

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Overview

CONTENTS

TRANSLATOR'S NOTE
"LARS, MY LAD!"
THE SAUSAGE
THE OLD WOMAN AND THE TRAMP
WHAT SHALL BABY'S NAME BE?
ST. PETER AND THE TWO WOMEN
THE OLD WOMAN AND THE FISH
THE VALIANT CHANTICLEER
TWIGMUNTUS, COWBELLIANTUS, PERCHNOSIUS
THE LAD AND THE FOX
OLD NICK AND THE GIRL
THE STONE STATUE
THE ARTFUL LAD
"ALL I POSSESS!"
KATIE GREY
THE COCK AND THE CRESTED HEN
OLD NICK AND THE PEDLAR
WHY THE EXECUTIONER IS CALLED ASSESSOR
THE PARSON AND THE CLERK


TRANSLATOR'S NOTE (From the Edition of 1901)

The interesting and characteristic collection of Swedish Folk and Fairy Tales published by Baron Djurklou nearly twenty years ago, has, strange to say, escaped the attention of folk-lorists outside the country of their origin. They are written in the dialect of the Swedish peasantry, to the study of which the author has devoted so much time and labour, and they may therefore have presented difficulties in the way of translation into other languages. In the present English version of a selection from the tales the translator has tried to retain as far as possible the humorous and colloquial style of the original. The illustrations in the body of the book are by T. Kittelsen and E. Werenskiold, two well-known Norwegian artists, and the frontispiece is by Carl Larsson, the prince of Swedish illustrators.

--H. L. B.


An excerpt from the beginning of the first story:

"LARS, MY LAD!"

There was once a prince or a duke, or something of that sort, but at any rate he belonged to a very grand family, and he would not stop at home. So he travelled all over the world, and wherever he went he was well liked, and was received in the best and gayest families, for he had no end of money. He made friends and acquaintances, as you may imagine, wherever he went, for he who has a well-filled trough is sure to fall in with pigs who want to have their fill. But he went on spending his money until he came to want, and at last his purse became so empty that he had not even a farthing left. And now there was an end to all his friends as well, for they behaved like the pigs; when the trough was empty and he had no more to give them, they began to grunt and grin, and then they ran away in all directions. There he stood alone with a long face. Everybody had been so willing to help him to get rid of his money, but nobody would help him in return; and so there was nothing for it but to trudge home and beg for crusts on the way.

So late one evening he came to a great forest. He did not know where he should find a shelter for the night, but he went on looking and searching till he caught sight of an old tumble-down hut, which stood in the middle of some bushes. It was not exactly good enough for such a fine cavalier, but when you cannot get what you want you must take what you can get. And, since there was no help for it, he went into the hut. Not a living soul was to be seen; there was not even a stool to sit upon, but alongside the wall stood a big chest. What could there be inside that chest? If only there were some bits of mouldy bread in it! How nice they would taste! For, you must know, he had not had a single bit of food the whole day, and he was so hungry and his stomach so empty that it groaned with pain. He lifted the lid. But inside the chest there was another chest, and inside that chest there was another; and so it went on, each one smaller than the other, until they became quite tiny boxes. The more there were the harder he worked away, for there must be something very fine inside, he thought, since it was so well hidden.

At last he came to a tiny, little box, and in this box lay a bit of paper—and that was all he got for his trouble! It was very annoying, of course, but then he discovered there was something written on the paper, and when he looked at it he was just able to spell it out, although at first it looked somewhat difficult.

"Lars, my lad!"

As he pronounced these words something answered right in his ear:

"What are master's orders?"

He looked round, but he saw nobody. This was very funny, he thought, and so he read out the words once more:

"Lars, my lad!"

And the answer came as before:

"What are master's orders?"

But he did not see anybody this time either.

"If there is anybody about who hears what I say, then be kind enough to bring me something to eat," he said. And the next moment there stood a table laid out with all the best things one could think of. He set to work to eat and drink, and had a proper fill. He had never enjoyed himself so much in all his life, he thought.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940012165367
Publisher: Leila's Books
Publication date: 01/05/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 1,069,154
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 6 - 8 Years

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