Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century

Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century

by Robert Charles Wilson

Paperback(First Edition)

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Overview

In 1912, history was changed by the Miracle, when the old world of Europe was replaced by Darwinia, a strange land of nightmarish jungle and antediluvian monsters. To some, the Miracle was an act of divine retribution; to others, it is an opportunity to carve out a new empire.

Leaving an America now ruled by religious fundamentalists, young Guilford Law travels to Darwinia on a mission of discovery that will take him further than he can possibly imagine…to a shattering revelation about mankind's destiny in the universe.

Robert Charles Wilson has crafted a brilliant science fiction novel—a view of an utterly different 20th century.

Darwinia is a 1999 Hugo Award Nominee for Best Novel.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765319050
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 09/04/2007
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 926,081
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.72(d)

About the Author

Robert Charles Wilson's novels include Darwinia; The Chronoliths and Blind Lake, which were finalists for SF's Hugo Award; and Spin, which won the 2006 Hugo for best novel. He is a winner of the Philip K. Dick Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

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Darwinia: A Novel of a Very Different Twentieth Century 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
RBeffa on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Darwinia was an interesting and very good read. Most of the novel I enjoyed immensely. Good characters in here and a richly painted canvas of ideas. Darwinia is an alternate history of 20th century earth, when an event occurs in 1912 that is radically different than our world. Our world still exists, but the earth of Darwinia isn't a parallel world. When I began reading this I guessed that a parallel earth had somehow intersected with ours with the result that Europe was completely overlaid with the new wild land of Darwinia. But this proved to not be the case, although in way not far removed from it. I guess the best way to describe it is to say it is a galactic memory of our world that is having history rewritten. In the background which we learn imperfectly as the novel progresses is a strange sort of galactic war wherein the archives of all the life through the universe that has preceded it is being infiltrated and corrupted by something akin to a computer virus. Although this is the background behind the story, the majority of the novel is much more like a modern well written science fictional adventure/mystery story in the vein of Edgar Rice Burroughs, whose stories incidently are referenced several times within the book.Parts of it are a little tough to swallow and flew somewhere high overhead for me, but the heart of the story was excellent and I'm glad to have finally tackled this interesting novel. The first third or so of the novel was really my favorite, and the ending wasn't quite up to the level of what had preceded it.
TheDavisChanger on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A quick read in one of my favorite settings, the story is fleshed out as the chapters rotate through three main characters, some of them more interesting than others. The mechanism that explains the Miracle feels a bit like a cheat, but it appeals to my science fiction sensibilities, so I could not help but be taken in by it.
thesmellofbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a good book. When I began reading it I remembered what a strong writer Wilson is. I was reminded of two authors: Eileen Kernaghan, for the beauty and clarity of the language, and JG Ballard (think Crystal World) for the invented and fantastic wild land.A satisfying read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great story telling and a very intersting premise. Can be a little confusing in spots but keep reading. It helps if you know some history of science but not absolutly needed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1912, war in Europe seems imminent when an alien realm Darwinia abruptly replaces Europe on planet earth. The United States is unconcerned with what has vanished instead declares the cosmos event a Miracle and encourages colonization especially by the devout who believe this is God¿s work to replace evil with good. Over the next few years a few struggling colonies settled mostly by religious fanatics are formed within the extraterrestrial forests. In 1920 American creationist scientist Preston Finch leads an expedition to chart the New World. Boston photographer Guilford Law leaves wife Caroline and daughter Lily in New London as he joins the quest. However, the journey proves dangerous as outlaws and the strange alien wildlife attack them. However, it is the dreams and odd occurrences that frighten the participants. Guilford the photographer meets Guilford the dead WW I soldier before leaving Darwinia. In New London he learns that his family thought he died so they left to grieve in Australia. The other Guilford explains to the bewildered photographer that they are expendable military fodder protecting humanity in a universal war through time against demon controlled humans. When Darwinia came to earth to protect the enigmatic Archive from the Great War hostility came with it to this time and place. This extremely complex and convoluted alternate history thriller is a difficult tale to follow as the story line is not always linear especially when the scope widens laterally. Guilford the photographer is a fascinating lead character as his problems with his wife that seemed monumental before the expedition now appear molehill as he begins to understand what is happening on a global scale. Fans who prefer deep thought provoking thrillers will want to read this intricate tale as Guilford learns nothing is quite what it seems, not even demons. Harriet Klausner