The Curse of the Mistwraith (Ships of Merior Series #1)

The Curse of the Mistwraith (Ships of Merior Series #1)

by Janny Wurts

Paperback((Reissue))

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Overview

The stunning first volume in Janny Wurts’s epic tale of two half-brothers cursed to life-long enmity, now re-released with a striking new cover.

The world of Athera lives in eternal fog, its skies obscured by the malevolent Mistwraith. Only the combined powers of two half-brothers can challenge the Mistwraith’s stranglehold: Arithon, Master of Shadow and Lysaer, Lord of Light.

Arithon and Lysaer will find that they are inescapably bound inside a pattern of events dictated by their own deepest convictions. Yet there is more at stake than one battle with the Mistwraith – as the sorcerers of the Fellowship of Seven know well. For between them the half-brothers hold the balance of the world, its harmony and its future, in their hands.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780586210697
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
Publication date: 05/01/2009
Series: Wars of Light and Shadow Series , #1
Edition description: (Reissue)
Pages: 848
Product dimensions: 4.40(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.60(d)

About the Author

Janny Wurts is the author of the Cycle of Fire series, co-author of the worldwide bestselling Empire series with Raymond E. Feist, and is currently working on the Wars of Light and Shadow series. She often paints her own covers and is also an expert horsewoman, sailor, musician and archer.

Date of Birth:

December 10, 1953

Place of Birth:

Bryn Mawr, Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania

Table of Contents

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

‘Astonishingly original and compelling’ Raymond E. Feist‘It ought to be illegal for one person to have so much talent’ Stephen Donaldson

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The Curse of the Mistwraith (Ships of Merior Series #1) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
JonMoss More than 1 year ago
I highly recommend this book and this series for the devoted lovers and perspicacious readers of complex multifaceted myriad-layered epic fantasy brimming with inimitable characterizations and sublime universe craftsmanship.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first book in a sweeping epic, it sets up a complex set of worlds & yet also has a ton of action. If you're looking for something that rivals the Lord of the Rings, I think this is it. If you're looking for a quick easy read, something you can skim through - don't read this book. You'll only get confused. Every word is hand picked & polished to wring out the full meaning. While the book is a setup to a series, it doesn't end on a cliff hanger, something I appreciate. Actually, it could easily be two books & was in at least one edition (German, I think). The action rises to a peak in about the middle & that would make a fine novel, all on its own. Then, very logically & smoothly, the adventure continues until another shattering climax at the end. The players are all still there & it's obvious life goes on, so I'm ready to read the next in the series. (The complete series this time - they're all coming now!!!) This is a book I'll keep & re-read, something I don't do lightly any more. There are too many good books out there to re-read any but the best.
ebw More than 1 year ago
I have read every book in this series, and have patiently waited for the story to continue. I enjoy the broad scope of the books, and the characters. They are very well developed. Hopefully we will find a new book soon. This is so much better then the Wheel of Time series.
jimmaclachlan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The first book in a sweeping epic, it sets up a complex set of worlds & yet also has a ton of action. If you're looking for something that rivals the Lord of the Rings, I think this is it. If you're looking for a quick easy read, something you can skim through - don't read this book. You'll only get confused. Every word is hand picked & polished to wring out the full meaning.While the book is a setup to a series, it doesn't end on a cliff hanger, something I appreciate. Actually, it could easily be two books & was in at least one edition (German, I think). The action rises to a peak in about the middle & that would make a fine novel, all on its own. Then, very logically & smoothly, the adventure continues until another shattering climax at the end. The players are all still there & it's obvious life goes on, so I'm ready to read the next in the series. (The complete series this time - they're all coming now!!!)This is a book I'll keep & re-read, something I don't do lightly any more. There are too many good books out there to re-read any but the best.
Sorrel on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Curse of the Mistwraith completely failed to engage my imagination. It presents a very detached view of a world that might have been interesting if only it had been more accessible. It's a series that I definitely won't be picking up again. (Despite this, I have enjoyed other books by this author eg. Sorcerer¿s Legacy.)
Karlstar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While the start of this book was a bit slow and confusing, I really enjoyed it by the time it was halfway through. The characters are interesting and complex, and the plot and action are almost as good.
rbtwinky on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This has got to be the single worst book I have ever read. I can't think of a single redeemable thing about this book. And I really loved the Empire series that Wurts wrote with Feist. What a disappointment.The writing of the book is probably my least favorite part. Janny Wurts's writing is beyond convoluted and well past purple. I frequently found myself completely lost in her sentences, most often because the subject was unclear or didn't come into the sentence until I was already lost. On another note, Wurts very carefully ping pongs between two possible descriptors for each character, which I found terribly irritating. The main character is either Arithon or "The Master of Shadows," with Wurts alternating evenly between the two. The titles given to the characters were obscure and completely meaningless, at least in this first installment in the series. How ~did~ Arithon get labelled The Master of Shadows anyway? Not that I am terribly interested, I just tire of the empty moniker.Which brings me into the characters themselves. There may or may not have been likable qualities about each of the two main characters for the first 400 pages of the book. I found myself much more interested in Lysaer, personally. It didn't matter, however, because as Wurts got into the meat of her climax, both characters lost their free will. Someone explain to me why I should be the least bit interested in what happens to two automatons? I certainly don't care about what effect they have on their world.Which brings me to the world building. It may have been that I couldn't see through Wurts's purple prose to get a feel for the place, but I still don't have a sense of Etarra other than who its factions are and the fact that it is just recovering from inconceivable periods of stunted existence. Warring factions abound, with clear good guys and bad guys. The noble barbarians versus the corrupt townspeople, nevermind that each is a result of their circumstances after hundreds of years. The quirky meddling male sorcerers, which are somehow better than the meddling female sorcerers. Nor is the magic terribly interesting. Wurts goes to great effort to describe her magic system, but skips some basics, like what exactly is a "lane." It felt like too much and too little at the same time, which is really an apt description of the entire book.I have thought of one redeemable aspect of the novel: Elaira, the only character in the entire novel who makes conscious decisions. It's unfortunate that I liked her so much, as I certainly will not be reading anymore of this series.
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Princely royalty, half-brothers bred from childhood to rule - and to hate one another - pirate king's son, Master of Shadow Arithon, and s'Illessid prince and royal heir Lysaer are thrown through a world gate together. Banished into a cursed world which they are fated to save, the pair fulfill a prophecy spelling the end of the Mistwraith, a fell miasma which has held the land of Athera hostage for centuries. Forced to work together, the two come to share grudging respect, and almost affection for one another. Sunlight prevails, but it would be a boring story that ended there, right?Unfortunately for Athera, the Mistwraith shrouding the countryside is not only evil beyond reckoning, but it's clever as well. Banished, bound and warded by the combined efforts of the princes and the Fellowship of Sorcerers, before it goes a piece of it wraps tendrils around the princes' gifts, warping them beyond reckoning. Will the lifted curse spell ultimate doom for the princes, the world of Athera, and the mysterious Paravian creatures (elves, centaurs, and unicorns) that the Fellowship risks all to save? You'll have to read the sequels to find out.Stretching to 590 pages, not including the extensive glossary, Wurts opens her series with a tome to be respected (if for no other reason than that dropping it on your toes will hurt!). The story is finely crafted and the characters are sympathetic. It should be easy to forget that this is a story viewed through the eyes of a seer far, far in the future; that from the first pages, history has already tarred Arithon a villain and Lysaer a savior. But with plenty of foreshadowed and foreseen gloom and doom (seers, prophecies... no one ever seems to have good dreams to forecast) and lots of blood, rain, warped gifts and helpless wizards, the story a grim one. Still, I was glad I had the second installment close to hand, as not much gets resolved at the "end" of book one.
Caden on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Arithon and Lysaer are half brothers cursed to destroy one another plunging a world where they do not belong in to chaos. Arithon is a trained mage and Lysaer is a prince of Amroth. This is a fantastic book. The writing is stunning and the author takes you on a wonderful detailed journey . Might need a dictionary for this book but def does not spoil it for me I just love it.
StarGazer72 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is an absolutely wonderful book. Ms. Wurts has a great command of language; the characters have depth; and the plot is both intricate and interesting, with the set-up for many more books to follow. It is thought-provoking and turns assumed expectations on their head. Definitely highly suggested.
allreb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Meh. I read this in middle school and remember really enjoying the character of Arithon, but never having finished the series; I got a copy used a few months ago, and couldn't even finish it. The prose is too purple and uses a lot of random italics; the plot is convoluted. It's also too pessimistic for my tastes, since we know from the get-go that it's going to be the Saga of How Arithon's Life Sucks.
villandry on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Music and swords and magic. What drew me to this book when I first picked it up in the mid 90¿s was, frankly, the cover illustration, but it was the idea of a quest and a world where vanquishing the villain requires a collaboration between the elements of dark and light that prompted me to read it. The world is paradoxical and complex, the plot is (simplistically) a twist on the usual idea that what is light is good and what is dark is bad. I fell in love with the world of Athera and her cast of characters. The richness of the writing makes it all come alive. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves an epic adventure with intelligence and creativity. The writing is spiced up with these lovely and wrenching moments of crystal clear description ¿ an existential style snapshot of time¿ for me, the writing is visually evocative and emotionally captivating.The story focuses on two young men, Princes each, pitted against each other by the wars of their fathers. They are half-brothers born of a magical mother who has gifted them with elemental powers, one of light, one of shadow. They grew up very differently, were trained for different pursuits and have very different personalities, looks and ambitions. They are opposites in many ways. But through an arduous and wrenching twist of fate, they must work together to save a world not their own from an insidious, mysterious wraith that has swallowed the sunlight in mist. It¿s a complex tale that hints at much, much more to come. The cast of characters and creatures is fascinatingly rich and the writing of Janny Wurts brings it all alive vividly. The tale is set against a backdrop of recent civil uprising, making the political landscape as treacherous as the magical one. An outcast society of clansmen, a complicated network of meddling witches, pirates, musicians, and the ¿not so typical¿ band of bearded sorcerers (one of which appears to have defected) are some of the people introduced along with the world of Athera. I really enjoyed the book on many levels. It is an epic story of flawed relationships, of the struggle to break free of imposed fate or identity, of great and small portents, and the horror of war. And magic, of course! Magic as a living force of nature. My personal favorite, the unicorns dancing¿ a dream of beauty so pure it can crack open the human soul.Read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay, read the below post for the key and other notices. The Titles are missing but I will get them posted asap. Thank you!<p>1. Map (A)<br>2. Applications (C)<br>3. Axiom of Hell (B)<br>4. Ranks and Rules (B)<br>5. Territory (A)<br>6. Weather Report (B)<br>7. Messages (C)<br>8. Exo Camp (C)<p>There are very acute differences so keep that in mind as well! Hope to see you soon!<br>~L&beta
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first book of Ms. Wurts I read and was immediately hooked. The story itself is epic and convoluted, must woven masterfully. By the end of the series no end will be left unconnected, everything will fall into place, and you will wonder how she kept it all straight, she's that good. Of course, it's not over yet, but she hasn't disappointed me yet. The characters in this series are so developed they feel real, and they act in surprising ways, but all within in character. One of Janny's talents is to write a story that has familiar themes and make it completely new and always surprising, and for someone who has read a lot of fantasy, that's saying something. I will say her writing can be complicated, the style flowery. Personally I don't mind it. I even like it. It certainly makes for an interesting read the second and third times through because I find things I missed the first time and make connections on after reading the books that follow. This one is in my collection of all time favorites.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PhoenixFalls More than 1 year ago
If I had read just the last 50 pages of this novel I would have been quite impressed. They are wonderfully moving, reminiscent (in a good way) of the section in The Return of the King before the hobbits head back to the Shire. Unfortunately, those last 50 pages are not earned by the 540 pages before. The first 540 pages were really quite bad -- not because Wurts is a poor writer, but because she is a poor storyteller. The sentence-by-sentence writing is actually quite good -- there was some beautiful imagery sprinkled throughout the novel. But while each sentence was crafted well, somehow the story never gelled. I didn't believe the characters. I didn't believe the world. I *really* didn't believe the politics. And in every single scene I wanted to be in some other scene -- she always seemed to be moving away from the action instead of towards it. There were more little quirks of her storytelling that annoyed me than I can count -- she summed up important scenes rather than showing them; she used peoples' titles for no reason I could come up with but the fact that she had already used their name in the same paragraph; she was far more in love with her characters than I was; etc. And the biggest failing -- though many published (best-selling even!) writers fail at this one, so maybe it doesn't bother others as much as it does me -- all of the conflict in the novel rested on characters refusing to tell each other anything. If the mages and the two leads had simply sat down together on page 100 and pooled their information, all the conflict would have been brought to a head where it could be dealt with summarily. Of course, then there would be no epic door-stopper fantasy novel.
sleo More than 1 year ago
This may have been one of the best books I've read. It certainly has one of the most complex, intrigueing, and intense, brilliant, and enchanting main characters I've come across in a long, long time. I am so glad there are more books because I'm not ready to let go of Arithon. It took some time for me to get oriented in the complex world that Janny has created. But once I did, it was hang on because the action is exciting and potentially deadly, the evil is truly scary, and the two half brothers are fascinating. Essentially the book is about what the title says - wars of light and shadow. One brother commands light, the other shadow. In a sense, it's the old war of good and evil, or of consciousness and unconsciousness; but the complexity and ambiguity of good/bad, light/dark are not so easy to discern. The one character that I fell in love with is Arithon in all his intensity, his deep understanding of the consequences of action/non-action, love/hate, good are so painful at times that it brought tears to my eyes. And even though events take place in a fantasy world, the conflicts, tensions, and emotions are very real and pertinent to today.
Denaaron More than 1 year ago
The compelling story line coupled with a unique style of writing make for a very interesting book. It is difficult to get into in the beginning. But, it is well worth keeping to.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Map<p> Hello and welcome to the Information Center of Pandemonium! Here you will find the location of everything found within the results and where it would be acceptable to post or not. Please be mature and respect that so I don't have to stress myself out trying to continuously retype everything. Thank you!</p> <p> Key:<br />(A) no posting<br />(B) Praetors only<br />(C) free for everyone</p> <p> Map:<br />Result One: Map (A)<br />Result Two: Axiom of Hell (A)<br />Result Three: Applications (C)<br /> Result Four: Titles of Pandemonium (A)<br />Result Five: Territory (A)<br />Result Six: Weather Report (B)<br /> Result Seven: Ranks and Rules (A)<br />Result Eight: Exo Camp (C)<br />Result Nine:Messages (C)</p> <p> Thank you and hope to meet you soon. I will try to keep this up to date as things move around.</p> <p> ~LB</p>