Coyote Blue

Coyote Blue

by Christopher Moore

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

From master of subversive humor Christopher Moore comes a quirky, irreverent novel of love, myth, metaphysics, outlaw biking, angst, and outrageous redemption.

As a boy, he was Samson Hunts Alone—until a deadly misunderstanding with the law forced him to flee the Crow reservation at age fifteen. Today he is Samuel Hunter, a successful Santa Barbara insurance salesman with a Mercedes, a condo, and a hollow, invented life. Then one day, destiny offers him the dangerous gift of love—in the exquisite form of Calliope Kincaid—and a curse in the unheralded appearance of an ancient god by the name of Coyote. Coyote, the trickster, has arrived to reawaken the mystical storyteller within Sam...and to seriously screw up his existence in the process.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416558477
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 03/18/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 303,151
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Christopher Moore is the bestselling author of You Suck, A Dirty Job, The Stupidest Angel, Fluke, Lamb, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, Island of the Sequined Love Nun, Bloodsucking Fiends, and Practical Demonkeeping. Visit the
official Christopher Moore website at www.chrismoore.com.

Hometown:

Hawaii and San Francisco, California

Date of Birth:

August 5, 1958

Place of Birth:

Toledo, Ohio

What People are Saying About This

Patti Davis

If Carlos Castenada had created his Don Juan with a greater sense of humor, the result would have been Coyote. A fascinating trip.

Reading Group Guide

Coyote Blue

Christopher Moore

Description

Part love story, part vision quest, and always somewhat wacky, Coyote Blue tells the story of Sam Hunter – born Samson Hunts Alone on a Crow Indian Reservation, but reinvents himself as a successful insurance broker, until he is hit with the lightning bolt of love that goes by the name of Calliope. However, as with all Christopher Moore novels, there is something… weird… afoot, and that comes in the form of Old Man Coyote, an ancient Indian god famous for his abilities as a trickster, who leads Sam into more trouble than he can imagine, but also helps him find his way home.

Questions and Topics for Discussion

1. Sam Hunter was initially known as Samson Hunts Alone. What does his name represent? What about the other names in the novel? Is Moore telling us more with the naming? What Indian/Native American name would you select for yourself and why? What do you think describes you best?

2. In ancient Greek and Roman mythology Calliope was the Muse that was associated with creativity, music, artistic expression, and epic poetry. Why name the main female character that name? In what ways did Calliope inspire Sam? Lead him on a journey?

3. Old-Man Coyote, or The Coyote is also known as a Trickster, who can alternately be scandalous, disgusting, amusing, and disruptive, but can also be a creative force in peoples lives, transforming their worlds in bizarre and outrageous ways. Why do you think The Coyote comes into Sam’s life when he does, and are all of the changes he makes for the better?

4. Discuss morality in the course of the book. After The Coyote has disrupted Sam’s life, he goes about “making things right” in various way, for instance by getting Sam’s home back by breaking Josh Spagnola’s legs and helping to blackmail Aaron Aaron. Is he really doing right to Sam by doing wrong to others?

5. Sam doesn’t drink because he fears the stereotype of the “drunken Indian” that he has left behind on the Crow Reservation. Discuss stereotypes and how grounded they are in reality. What other “stock” characters are represented in the book? How closely do they lie to their stereotypes?


6. Religion and faith weave itself into the book in many different ways from Indian/Native American mysticism, Egyptian mythology to various eastern religions. Discuss faith as it relates to the characters in the book.

7. When Aaron is teaching Sam the various tricks of the insurance game he tells him to “remember the three m’s: mesmerize, motivate, and manipulate” because you’re not selling a need, but rather a dream. How does Sam react to this? What does this say about his character?


8. Discuss the idea of communities serving as extended families, which is something stressed in the book about the Crow tribe? Discuss other examples of the “it takes a village”idea.

9. Chart Sam’s course from denying his heritage to “finding his way home.” Identify and discuss key points in the book that mark a turning point in Sam’s journey.

10. Which main character did you get the most “attached” to in the book? Sam? Old Coyote? Why? What qualities of this character make them endearing to you?



Tips to Enhance Your Bookclub


    1. Imagine leaving the life that you grew up with and creating an entirely different persona for yourself as Sam did. What would you change about yourself, where would you go? What new profession would you choose
    2. In many Native American cultures, when you enter the spirit world, you can be reincarnated as some new being. Do you believe in reincarnation? If so, what would you like to return as? Why? Learn more about reincarnation at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reincarnatio
    3. Learn more about Christopher Moore and his other works at: http://www.chrismoore.com/

Introduction

Part love story, part vision quest, and always somewhat wacky, Coyote Blue tells the story of Sam Hunter — born Samson Hunts Alone on a Crow Indian Reservation, but who reinvents himself as a successful insurance broker, until he is hit with the lightning bolt of love that goes by the name of Calliope. However, as with all Christopher Moore novels, there is something...weird...afoot, and that comes in the form of Old Man Coyote, an ancient Indian god famous for his abilities as a trickster, who leads Sam into more trouble than he can imagine, but also helps him find his way home.

Questions for Discussion:

1. Sam Hunter was initially known as Samson Hunts Alone. What does his name represent? What about the other names in the novel? Is Moore telling us more with the naming? What Indian/Native American name would you select for yourself and why? What do you think describes you best?

2. In ancient Greek and Roman mythology Calliope was the Muse that was associated with creativity, music, artistic expression, and epic poetry. Why name the main female character that name? In what ways did Calliope inspire Sam? How did she lead him on a journey?

3. "Old Man Coyote," or "Coyote," is also known as the Trickster, who can alternately be scandalous, disgusting, amusing, and disruptive, but can also be a creative force in people's lives, transforming their worlds in bizarre and outrageous ways. Why do you think the Coyote comes into Sam's life when he does, and are all the changes he makes for the better?

4. Discuss morality in the course of the book. After the Coyote has disrupted Sam's life, he goes about "making things right" in various ways — for instance, bygetting Sam's home back by breaking Josh Spagnola's legs and helping to blackmail Aaron Aaron. Is he really doing right to Sam by doing wrong to others?

5. Sam doesn't drink because he fears the stereotype of the "drunken Indian" that he has left behind on the Crow Reservation. Discuss stereotypes and how grounded they are in reality. What other "stock" characters are represented in the book? How close are they to their stereotypes?

6. Religion and faith weave themselves into the book in many different ways from Indian/Native American mysticism, Egyptian mythology, to various eastern religions. Discuss faith as it relates to the characters in the book.

7. When Aaron is teaching Sam the various tricks of the insurance game, he tells him to "remember the three m's: mesmerize, motivate, and manipulate" because you're not selling a need, but rather a dream. How does Sam react to this? What does this say about his character?

8. Discuss the idea of communities serving as extended families, which is something stressed in the book about the Crow tribe. Discuss other examples of the "it takes a village" idea.

9. Chart Sam's course from denying his heritage to "finding his way home." Identify and discuss key points in the book that mark a turning point in Sam's journey.

10. Which main character did you get the most "attached" to in the book? Sam? Coyote? Why? What qualities of this character make them endearing to you?

Enhancing Your Book Club:

1. Imagine leaving the life that you grew up with and creating an entirely different persona for yourself, as Sam did. What would you change about yourself, where would you go? What new profession would you choose?

2. In many Native American cultures, when you enter the Spirit World, you can be reincarnated as some new being. Do you believe in reincarnation? If so, what would you like to return as? Why? Learn more about reincarnation at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reincarnation.

3. Learn more about Christopher Moore and his other works at www.chrismoore.com/.

Customer Reviews

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Coyote Blue 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 141 reviews.
JgleJne More than 1 year ago
Loved this book...very entertaining and funny! i could not stop reading once i started....Loved the characters and how they interacted with each other...i started reading another of his books right after this one...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a light hearted, fun read that is hard to put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first Christopher Moore novel I read, and it led me to become a huge fan of this author. Moore takes the standard 'normal, boring guy falls in love and turns his life upside-down' story and makes it fresh, incredibly entertaining, and fun. Don't be deterred if you're not a fan of fantasy novels (the talking coyote could just as easily be the 'crazy best friend' character in any other novel), because the concept of shedding a false persona to find true self-realization should appeal to fans of any genre. Robert H. Goretsky Hoboken, NJ
Guest More than 1 year ago
...but still very entertaining. I found it a bit dry at times, but only in comparison to his other novels. Still holds true to Moore's craziness!
AHS-Wolfy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Samson Hunts Alone had to leave the Crow reservation because he killed a cop so now he goes by the name of Samuel Hunter and lives in Santa Barbara as a very successful insurance salesman. At the time he meets and falls madly in lust with Calliope, Sam's long forgotten spirit helper also makes a re-appearance in his life. Coyote, the trickster, causes nothing but turmoil in Sam's life and he's quickly about to lose everything he's worked hard to attain. His home, his job and even his very freedom are jeopardised at the arrival of Coyote. But when Calliope leaves to chase after her ex and father of their child who has absconded with their son on a motorcycle rally, Sam realises his feelings are much deeper and follows after to help her get him back. For this he needs the trickster's help and that story is never going to end well.Mixing a lot of different myths and mythology along the way this is an amusing tale of self-discovery with some interesting characters met along the way. Having previously read A Dirty Job it was good to see the back-story from a character featured in that novel and a cameo appearance of another from a few other of Moore's work. As with his other books that I've read, the humour is quite irreverent so I do not advise reading this if you think it might offend your religious sensibilities. I kind of liked it though.
froggiesl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed many of this authors books in the past, but this one I could just not get into no matter how hard I tried. It did have some very funny moments, and I'm sure is a wonderful read, but not my style. I did like how he works characters from other books into the story. It was good to see Minty Fresh again!
SonicQuack on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'd never read any of Cristopher Moore's books before and after Coyote Blue I'm looking forwards to others. The closest reference I can use is the work of Carl Hiaasen. The story should be straight-forward, a simple tale of a shallow man finding love, which reveals how empty his life is. Although it's not entirely clear where the story is going to take you, stay for the ride. You'll encounter Las Vegas from a new perspective, a psychopathic gang of bikers, sly salesmen and the god Coyote, the Trickster. It's Hiassen on a supernatural trip - clever, funny and disturbingly accurate. A good yarn, which doesn't overstay it's welcome. Recommended.
irunsjh on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very funny read. I liked the direction that we were taken with the book. I did not expect to be left with such an appealling cliffhanger of a book. I am looking forward to Mr. Moore to retrurning to this world, to see what he does with the Coyote next time.
craso on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sam Hunter is a successful insurance salesman in Santa Barbara. He owns a Mercedes and lives in a luxury condo. Stepping out of his office one day he meets a beautiful girl with car trouble. He doesn't realize it yet, but his whole world is about to change. Sam must face his past, his real name is Samson Hunts Alone and he is a Crow Indian. He ran away from the reservation when he was a teenager. To get the woman of his dreams he will have to team up with Coyote, the trickster god and change the way he looks at life. This book was recommended to me by another LibraryThinger when I mentioned in my review of ¿Anansi Boys¿ that I liked Native American coyote trickster god stories. It wasn¿t as good as Neil Gaiman¿s book, but it was an enjoyable read. The action starts right from the first page and goes until the end. Sam meets unusual people that do some weird and wacky things and all of them are influenced by Old Man Coyote. The story is funny, but not laugh-out-loud funny. An amusing quick read. I would recommend it for a summer beach read.
hagelrat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The plot centres around Samual Hunter who tried to forget he was ever Sam Hunts Alone of the Crow and the sudden reappearance of Coyote in his life and apparent determination to ruin it. There is the usual silliness and some genuinely touching moments among the chaos and a moment of tranquility provided by a very zen mechanic.Through the course of the book Sam gets back in touch with his feeling, his roots, his trickster medicine and in the end, who he really is.
kmaziarz on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Samuel Hunter, born Samson Hunts Alone, left the Crow reservation of his birth when he was a teenager, on the run after accidentally killing a crooked cop in a fit of anger. Since then, the young Indian has become a master chameleon, fitting in perfectly with the greater white world. He has become a very successful insurance salesman, owns a very nice townhome and a Mercedes, and feels all-around quite satisfied with his life. So what if he isn¿t in love? So what if he doesn¿t have any family, or even any close friends? So what if he¿s so focused on fitting in and staying inconspicuous in his normality that he doesn¿t allow himself any strong emotions or real individuality? So what indeed! Unfortunately¿or fortunately, depending on how you look at it, Sam¿s spirit guide just doesn¿t see things the way Sam does. Sam¿s spirit guide is the ultimate troublemaker, you see¿the trickster god Old Man Coyote! It is more than just Coyote¿s job to shake things up; it is his very nature! So when Coyote checks in on Sam¿s life and decided to help the young man find his balance, Sam is in for the ride of his life.Soon, Sam finds himself in danger of losing his job and his townhome, in love with an eccentric young hippie named Calliope, and caught up in a whirlwind cross-country trip to Las Vegas to help Calliope retrieve her son from his dead-beat father, a drug-dealing biker with co-dependency issues. And through it all, Old Man Coyote is smack in the middle of things, causing trouble in the name of fixing what Sam didn¿t think was broken.¿Coyote Blue¿ is funny, wise, and just plain a heck of a lot of fun!
revslick on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Moore is a literary genius that has bouts of Tourette's syndrome while writing. Just when you think he's he's churning a classic he channels Beavis and Butthead or Carman. This one is all about the Irony and Moore pulls it from every direction even a few from his ***. He does this all while reinterpreting the Native American trickster tales about Coyote. I could reread this three more times and not cover all the ironic moments. best line - ¿Coyote medicine will do them white folks some good¿
miyurose on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have to admit that despite my love for A Dirty Job, I¿m not a big fan of Moore¿s earlier works. Not only are some characters reused (which I don¿t really have a problem with ¿ nothing wrong with recurring characters!), he uses some of the same stereotypes in every book, it seems. There¿s always a mostly-high surfer dude. There¿s always a cantankerous (and probably homely) old lady. And of course, the earnest (if sometimes misguided) main character. I think what really rubbed me wrong in this book was Coyote himself. I know he is supposed to be a 'trickster' spirit, but I found him more mean-spirited than anything. Especially when he steals Sam¿s car, sells it, and gambles away his bank account. I think you¿re supposed to find his naiveté endearing, but I didn¿t. I¿ll keep reading (or rather, listening) to Moore¿s books, but mostly because they¿re what my husband wants to hear.
sturlington on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Christopher Moore and Neil Gaiman have inspired a new category for my bookshelves: modern humorous spiritual fantasy. Moore in particularly is not afraid to tackle everything from Buddhism to memes. Coyote Blue is one of my favorites by him. The Native American trickster god Coyote is a starring character in the novel, and plenty of Coyote stories are sprinkled throughout, told in Moore¿s humorous style.The trickster leads Sam Hunter, a Crow Indian who is on the run from the law, on a chase after the best woman he¿s ever met and her baby son, who were kidnapped by the boy¿s father and a motorcycle gang ¿ which leads him right back to the reservation Sam originally ran away from. It always gets a little convoluted trying to summarize a Christopher Moore plot. They get to meet Anubis, Coyote¿s brother, and go to the Underworld along the way ¿ how¿s that for mixing metaphors?I thought Coyote Blue was one of Moore¿s finer novels, right up there with Lamb, even if it does get a little sloppy toward the end. If you¿ve never read any of Moore¿s novels, and you want something lighter to end the summer with, this would be a good choice.
Ti99er on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another fun read from the crazy world of Christopher Moore. I only have two more Moore books, before I don't have any more Moore books to read. Chris always creates wonderful characters and puts them in some really strange situations. This tale involves a tribal Indian Gods, a biker gang, and a few swindling insurance salemen to name just a few. Fun characters, funny situations and an overall good read.
nivramkoorb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As alway Christopher Moore never fails to entertain. Once you accept the type of novel you are reading, then you look at it through that set of lenses. Although he repeats his character types throughout his novels, this is what you read him for. He also educates you about certain parts of our environment but does it in a funny special way. He is in San Francisco this Friday and I hope to get to see him. One of my favorites although I can take a pass on the vampire stuff.
catsalive on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As a boy growing up in Montana, he was Samson Hunts Alone - until a deadly misunderstanding with the law forced him to flee the Crow reservation at age fifteen. Today he is Samuel Hunter, a successful Santa Barbara insurance salesman with a Mercedes, a condo, and a hollow, invented life. Then one day, shortly after his thirty-fifth birthday, destiny offers him the dangerous gift of love - in the exquisite form of Calliope Kincaid - and a curse in the unheralded appearance of an ancient Indian god by the name of Coyote. Coyote, the trickster, has arrived to transform tranquillity into chaos, to reawaken the mystical storyteller within Sam ...and to seriously screw up his existence in the process.I didn't enjoy this as much as "Love Nun", the only other Moore I've read. I found the whole thing quite dull & had no feeling for any of the characters, except for disliking tricksters. I was bored almost from the beginning but kept hoping something might compel my interest. Just not my thing.
jennyo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
After Lamb, Coyote Blue is my favorite Chris Moore book. I love the take on the trickster myth, I love the setting, and as usual I love the way Chris makes me laugh. Chris has said in interviews that Lamb and this book are the ones most often studied, and I can see why. They both say a lot of deep things and explore some common myths in a way that hasn't been done before.If you're trying to figure out where to start when reading Chris's books, I think this might be a good place. You'll get a feel pretty quickly for whether or not you like his style, and none of the other books are dependent on this story line.
missmath144 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The writing is good, it's funny, and yet it was easy to put down. Just not as good as some of his other books.
inwestcliffe on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Really enjoyed this story
saramllr on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I love Christopher Moore and his take on the Native American trickster myth is hysterical, as usual.
miketroll on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Wacky, entertaining black comedy of culture clash between Santa Barbara condo-dwellers and reservation Indians. As in Neil Gaiman's American Gods, the supernatural is real, but Coyote Blue doesn't take itself half so seriously. Read it for fun.
KathyWoodall on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
2/3 of this book I laughed my self silly. Christopher Moore has one of the wildest sense of humor i have ever read. Samuel Hunter is living the high life. Has a nice home, great job and drive a cool car. Suddenly his life is turned upside down when an ancient Indian God named Coyote shows up and wrecks havoc on his carefully consructed life. Mr. Moore holds my attention for most of the novel but like alot of his books his endings loose me. If it wasnt for the fact I didn't enjoy most of the book I wouldn't bother with his novels at all.
CheriePie69 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another great book by Moore! Thanks to yllus for allowing me to borrow this. :)This book has a lot of elements that really resonated with me as a Pagan: Coyote, the trickster, imperfect Gods, and the Egyptian pantheon later in the book. I also totally related to Calliope and her attitude and outlook on life. I'm somewhat of a hippy myself and most of her ways of looking at things, that seemed so strange to Sam, seemed natural to me. Yeah, she's very much at an extreme in some regards, i.e. calling the ants in the kitchen sink her kitchen pals and refusing to allow Sam to kill them, but I am like that with spiders. I draw the line at ants and any other kind of crawling bug anywhere in the kitchen or where food is prepared or eaten though. But I digress... ;)Overall, I found this a great book, right up there with all the other Chris Moore books I've read.
gazzy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
an Indian who has sworn off his cultural heritage only to have it forced upon him by a supernatural coyote spirit. uninspired, bland premise of not buoyed by the obvious comic tone of the writing.