Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States

Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States

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Overview

The years 1500–1700 AD were a time of dramatic change for the indigenous inhabitants of southeastern North America, yet Native histories during this era have been difficult to reconstruct due to a scarcity of written records before the eighteenth century. Using archaeology to enhance our knowledge of the period, Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States presents new research on the ways Native societies responded to early contact with Europeans.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781683401179
Publisher: University Press of Florida
Publication date: 02/25/2020
Series: Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series
Pages: 322
Sales rank: 1,257,719
Product dimensions: 6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.75(d)

About the Author

Edmond A. Boudreaux III is director of the Center for Archaeological Research and associate professor of anthropology at the University of Mississippi. He is the author of The Archaeology of Town Creek.

Maureen Meyers, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Mississippi, is coeditor of Archaeological Perspectives on the Southern Appalachians: A Multiscalar Approach.

Jay K. Johnson, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Mississippi, is the editor of Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Explicitly North American Perspective.

Table of Contents

Content

List of Figures

List of Tables

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Carden Bottoms: Indigenous Responses to Europeans on the Far Reaches of the Mississippian Shatter

George Sabo III, Jerry E. Hilliard, Leslie C. Walker, Jami J. Lockhart, Ann M. Early, and Rebecca L. F. Wiewel

2. The Early Contact Period in the Black Prairie of Northeast Mississippi

Edmond A. Boudreaux, III, Charles R. Cobb, Emily Clark, Chester B. DePratter, James Legg, Brad R. Lieb, Allison M. Smith, and Steven D. Smith

3. Oliver and Orchard Thumbnail Scrapers, a Technological and Source-Area Analysis

Jay K. Johnson and Ryan M. Parish

4. Tracking an Entrada by Comparative Analysis of sixteenth-Century Archaeological Assemblages from the Southeast

Dennis B. Blanton

5. Spanish Florida and the Southeastern Indians, 1513-1650

John E. Worth

6. New Frontier, Old Frontier

Ramie A. Gougeon

7. Avoidance Strategies of a Displaced Post-Mississippian Society on the Northern Gulf Coast, circa 1710

Gregory A. Waselkov and Philip J. Carr

8. An Arc of Interaction, a Flow of People, and Emergent Identity: Early Contact period Archaeology and Early European Interactions in the Middle Nolichucky Valley of Upper East Tennessee

Nathan K. Shreve, Jay D. Franklin, Eileen G. Ernenwein, Maureen A. Hays, and Ilaria Patania

9. From the Coast to the Mountains: Marine Shell Artifacts at Cherokee Towns in the Southern Appalachians

Christopher B. Rodning

10. Life at the Frontier of the sixteenth-seventeenth Century World Economy: Fort Ancient Hide Production at the Hardin Site, Greenup County, Kentucky

Matthew Davidson

11. The Seventeenth-Century Native-Colonial Borderlands of Savannah River Valley

Maureen Meyers

12. Yamasee Mobility: Responding to European Colonization through Old and New Strategies

Denise I. Bossy

13. Differential Responses Across the Southeast to European Incursions: A Conclusion

Robbie Ethridge

Bibliography

Index

Contributors

Contributors

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

The years AD 1500–1700 were a time of dramatic change for the indigenous inhabitants of southeastern North America, yet Native histories during this era have been difficult to reconstruct due to a scarcity of written records before the eighteenth century. Using archaeology to enhance our knowledge of the period, Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States presents new research on the ways Native societies responded to early contact with Europeans.

Featuring sites from Kentucky to Mississippi to Florida, these case studies investigate how indigenous groups were affected by the expeditions of explorers such as Hernando de Soto, Pánfilo de Narváez, and Juan Pardo. Contributors re-create the social geography of the Southeast during this time, trace the ways Native institutions changed as a result of colonial encounters, and emphasize the agency of indigenous populations in situations of contact. They demonstrate the importance of understanding the economic, political, and social variability that existed between Native and European groups.

Bridging the gap between historical records and material artifacts, this volume answers many questions and opens up further avenues for exploring these transformative centuries, pushing the field of early contact studies in new theoretical and methodological directions.


A volume in the Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series

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