Complete Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde

Complete Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde

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Overview

The master of wit and irony

Published here alongside their evocative original illustrations, these fairy tales, as Oscar Wilde himself explained, were written “partly for children, and partly for those who have kept the childlike faculties of wonder and joy.”

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451531070
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/07/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 337,152
Product dimensions: 4.25(w) x 6.94(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) was an Irish writer, poet, and playwright. His novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, brought him lasting recognition, and he became one of the most successful playwrights of the late Victorian era with a series of witty social satires, including his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest.

Jack Zipes is a preeminent fairy-tale scholar who has written, translated, and edited dozens of books, including The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm and Complete Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde. He is a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota.

Gyles Brandreth is a writer, speaker, broadcaster, and former Member of Parliament. His years as a government whip were chronicled in Breaking the Code: Westminster Diaries, which the Times described as “by far the best political diary of recent years." His other works include the bestsellers Philip and Elizabeth: Portrait of a Royal Marriage, Charles & Camilla: Portrait of a Love Affair, and The 7 Secrets of Happiness. Brandreth has also appeared as a reporter on BBC One's The One Show and is a regular on BBC Radio 4's Just a Minute.

Date of Birth:

October 16, 1854

Date of Death:

November 30, 1900

Place of Birth:

Dublin, Ireland

Place of Death:

Paris, France

Education:

The Royal School in Enniskillen, Dublin, 1864; Trinity College, Dublin, 1871; Magdalen College, Oxford, England, 1874

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Complete Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
tapestry100 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'll admit up front that I've never read anything by Oscar Wilde before now, and I think that I'm sorry that I've waited this long. I thoroughly enjoyed his fairy tales, and even found myself underlining multiple passages in the book for future reference. I felt that his insight into life and love and all the joy and troubles that come with both was quite remarkable and still very relevant for our time, even though these stories were written over 100 years ago. I'm sure that if I were more versed in fairy tales and folklore as a whole I might see more relations between his stories and those that came before, but taking these for what they are I enjoyed them immensely. The particular volume that I have contains both of Wilde's collections, The Happy Prince and Other Tales and A House of Pomegranates, in one volume, and I while I enjoyed all the stories, I found that I did enjoy the stories that were from The Happy Prince and Other Tales slightly more.The stories contained in The Happy Prince and Other Tales are 'The Happy Prince', 'The Nightingale and the Rose' (my favorite), 'The Selfish Giant', 'The Devoted Friend' (probable my next favorite), and 'The Remarkable Rocket'. A House of Pomegranates contains 'The Young King', 'The Birthday of the Infanta', 'The Fisherman and His Soul' (a unique reworking of 'The Little Mermaid'), and 'The Star-Child' (another unique reworking of 'Beauty and the Beast').The stories can easily be enjoyed just as much by adults as by children, and I think that adults as a whole may actually get more out the stories than children. The tales deal broadly with love and individualism and being true to your self even when others may look down on you. The views of love are both in and out of favor of it, and my favorite passage from the book deals with Love and how it can lead one astray: 'What a silly thing Love is. It is not half as useful as Logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true. In fact, it is quite impractical...' Like I said, the insights that Wilde has on love and life are quite remarkable and I found them very relevant for my life right now. I would highly recommend this book to anyone.
tloeffler on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A combination of Wilde's two fairy tale collections, The Happy Prince and Other Tales and A House of Pomegranates. Great fairy tales, most with a moral, and told in a delightful fashion. Much more than I expected.But why is the cover art "Keats and the Nightingale"?
ithilwyn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a completely different side of Wilde. The collection is very delightful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love Oscar Wilde! So when I came across these fairly tales, I expected to love them but I didn't. The stories are quite lovely but are usually rather tragic and definitely all have a very stong moral associated with them. I enjoyed the stories but I guess I was hoping that some of the stories woulld be more humorous..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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purrfectmatch More than 1 year ago
I never knew Oscar Wilde wrote fairy tales until it was recommended by Goodreads based on my recent fairy tales reading. So it sparked my curiosity and I decided to check them out. In my opinion these tales seem intended more for adults, but there is no reason that an older child couldn't enjoy reading them. Originally, he wrote two small collections of tales. If you have read Dorian Gray, there is at least one story that really has that cynical look at society in it, that is very Dorian Gray Wilde. Otherwise, for the most part, his tales feel a lot like Hans Christian Anderson. Whom he was familiar with like The Brothers Grimm. These tales were for the most, a good read, and a lot had lessons attached to the story, or a moral of sort. An interesting set of fairy tales.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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tapestry100 More than 1 year ago
I'll admit up front that I've never read anything by Oscar Wilde before now, and I think that I'm sorry that I've waited this long. I thoroughly enjoyed his fairy tales, and even found myself underlining multiple passages in the book for future reference. I felt that his insight into life and love and all the joy and troubles that come with both was quite remarkable and still very relevant for our time, even though these stories were written over 100 years ago. I'm sure that if I were more versed in fairy tales and folklore as a whole I might see more relations between his stories and those that came before, but taking these for what they are I enjoyed them immensely. The particular volume that I have contains both of Wilde's collections, "The Happy Prince and Other Tales" and "A House of Pomegranates", in one volume, and I while I enjoyed all the stories, I found that I did enjoy the stories that were from "The Happy Prince and Other Tales" slightly more. The stories contained in "The Happy Prince and Other Tales" are "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose" (my favorite), "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend" (probable my next favorite), and "The Remarkable Rocket". "A House of Pomegranates" contains "The Young King", "The Birthday of the Infanta", "The Fisherman and His Soul" (a unique reworking of "The Little Mermaid"), and "The Star-Child" (another unique reworking of "Beauty and the Beast"). The stories can easily be enjoyed just as much by adults as by children, and I think that adults as a whole may actually get more out the stories than children. The tales deal broadly with love and individualism and being true to your self even when others may look down on you. The views of love are both in and out of favor of it, and my favorite passage from the book deals with Love and how it can lead one astray: "What a silly thing Love is. It is not half as useful as Logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true. In fact, it is quite impractical..." Like I said, the insights that Wilde has on love and life are quite remarkable and I found them very relevant for my life right now. I would highly recommend this book to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sora_Pandora More than 1 year ago
(After the age of eight, most people can handle a book without pictures. I don't see any reason why this book would Have to include illustrations, so long as you have somewhat of an imagination.) Oscar Wilde was a genius. His dry wit makes an appearance in a few of these stories, but they are mostly bittersweet. An older, mature child would enjoy some of these tales, but I would say they're more likely to entertain a teen or adult, mostly because of the "big words". That said, I loved it when I read it in high school, and it's still one of my favorite collections of fairy tales. If you like Oscar Wilde's other writings, or if you're a big fan of short whimsical fantasy, I highly recommend this, especially "The Nightingale and The Rose".
fergusfive More than 1 year ago
Fairy tales, no matter how skillfully told, react to the magic of colorful illustrations. Without them, the tales never come to life.