Collected Fictions

Collected Fictions

Paperback(Complete and ed.)

$21.60 $24.00 Save 10% Current price is $21.6, Original price is $24. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Wednesday, October 23

Overview

For the first time in English, all the fiction by the writer who has been called “the greatest Spanish-language writer of our century” collected in a single volume

A Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition

 
From Jorge Luis Borges’s 1935 debut with The Universal History of Iniquity, through his immensely influential collections Ficciones and The Aleph, these enigmatic, elaborate, imaginative inventions display his talent for turning fiction on its head by playing with form and genre and toying with language. Together these incomparable works comprise the perfect one-volume compendium for all those who have long loved Borges, and a superb introduction to the master's work for those who have yet to discover this singular genius.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140286809
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/01/1999
Edition description: Complete and ed.
Pages: 576
Sales rank: 142,210
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jorge Luis Borges was born in Buenos Aires in 1989 and was educated in Europe. One of the most widely acclaimed writers of our time, he published many collections of poems, essays, and short stories before his death in Geneva in June 1986. In 1961 Borges shared the International Publisher’s prize with Samuel Beckett. The Ingram Merrill Foundation granted him its Annual Literary Award in 1966 for his “outstanding contribution to literature.” In 1971 Columbia University awarded him the first of many degrees of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa (eventually the list included both Oxford and Cambridge), that he was to receive from the English-speaking world. In 1971 he also received the fifth biennial Jerusalem Prize and in 1973 was given one of Mexico’s most prestigious cultural awards, the Alfonso Reyes Prize. In 1980 he shared with Gerardo Diego the Cervantes Prize, the Spanish world’s highest literary accolade. Borges was Director of the Argentine National Library from 1955 until 1973. 

Andrew Hurley (editor/translator) is a translator of numerous works of literature, criticism, history, and memoir. He is professor emeritus at the University of Puerto Rico.

Date of Birth:

August 24, 1899

Date of Death:

June 14, 1986

Place of Birth:

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Place of Death:

Geneva, Switzerland

Education:

B.A., Collège Calvin de Genève, 1914

Read an Excerpt

Contents

A UNIVERSAL HISTORY OF INIQUITY (1935)
 
Preface to the First Edition
Preface to the 1954 Edition
 
The Cruel Redeemer Lazarus Morell
The Improbable Impostor Tom Castro
The Widow Ching—Pirate
Monk Eastman, Purveyor of Iniquities
The Disinterested Killer Bill Harrigan
The Uncivil Teacher of Court Etiquette Kôtsuké no Suké
Hakim, the Masked Dyer of Merv
Man on Pink Corner
Et cetera
 
Index of Sources
 
FICTIONS (1944)
 
THE GARDEN OF FORKING PATHS (1941)
 
Foreword
 
Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius
The Approach to Al-Mu’tasim
Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote
The Circular Ruins
The Lottery in Babylon
A Survey of the Works of Herbert Quain
The Library of Babel
The Garden of Forking Paths
 
ARTIFICES (1944)
 
Foreword
 
Funes, His Memory
The Shape of the Sword
The Theme of the Traitor and the Hero Death and the Compass
The Secret Miracle
Three Versions of Judas
The End
The Cult of the Phoenix
The South
 
THE ALEPH (1949)
 
The Immortal
The Dead Man
The Theologians
Story of the Warrior and the Captive Maiden
A Biography of Tadeo Isidoro Cruz (1829–1874)
Emma Zunz
The House of Asterion
The Other Death
Deutsches Requiem
Averroës’ Search
The Zahir
The Writing of the God
Ibn-Hakam al-Bokhari, Murdered in His Labyrinth
The Two Kings and the Two Labyrinths
The Wait
The Man on the Threshold
The Aleph
 
Afterword
 
THE MAKER (1960)
 
Foreword: For Leopoldo Lugones
 
The Maker
Dreamtigers
A Dialog About a Dialog
Toenails
Covered Mirrors
Argumentum Ornithologicum
The Captive
The Mountebank
Delia Elena San Marco
A Dialog Between Dead Men
The Plot
A Problem
The Yellow Rose
The Witness
Martin Fierro
Mutations
Parable of Cervantes and the Quixote
Paradiso, XXXI, 108
Parable of the Palace
Everything and Nothing
Ragnarök
Inferno, I, 32
Borges and I
 
MUSEUM
 
On Exactitude in Science
In Memoriam, J.F.K.
 
Afterword
 
IN PRAISE OF DARKNESS (1969)
 
Foreword
 
The Ethnographer
Pedro Salvadores
Legend
A Prayer
His End and His Beginning
 
BRODIE'S REPORT (1970)
 
Foreword
 
The Interloper
Unworthy
The Story from Rosendo Juarez
The Encounter
Juan Murafta
The Elderly Lady
The Duel
The Other Duel
Guayaquil
The Gospel According to Mark
Brodie’s Report
 
THE BOOK OF SAND (1975)
 
The Other
Ulrikke
The Congress
There Are More Things
The Sect of the Thirty
The Night of the Gifts
The Mirror and the Mask
“Undr”
A Weary Man's Utopia
The Bribe
Avelino Arredondo
The Disk
The Book of Sand
 
Afterword
 
SHAKESPEARE’S MEMORY (1983)
August 25, 1983
Blue Tigers
The Rose of Paracelsus
Shakespeare’s Memory
 
A Note on the Translation
Acknowledgments
Notes to the Fictions

Table of Contents

Collected FictionsA Universal History of Iniquity (1935)
Preface to the First Edition
Preface to the 1954 Edition
The Cruel Redeemer Lazarus Morell
The Improbable Impostor Tom Castro
The Widow Ching - Pirate
Monk Eastman, Purveyor of Iniquities
The Disinterested Killer Bill Harrigan
The Uncivil Teacher of Court Etiquette Kôtsuké no Suké
Hakim, the Masked Dyer of Merv
Man on Pink Corner
Et cetera
Index of Sources

Fictions (1944)

The Garden of Forking Paths (1941)
Foreword
Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius
The Approach to Al-Mu'tasim
Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote
The Circular Ruins
The Lottery in Babylon
A Survey of the Works of Herbert Quain
The Library of Babel
The Garden of Forking Paths

Artifices (1944)
Foreword
Funes, His Memory
The Shape of the Sword
The Theme of the Traitor and the Hero
Death and the Compass
The Secret Miracle
Three Versions of Judas
The End
The Cult of the Phoenix
The South

The Aleph (1949)
The Immortal
The Dead Man
The Theologians
Story of the Warrior and the Captive Maiden
A Biography of Tadeo Isidoro Cruz (1829-1874)
Emma Zunz
The House of Asterion
The Other Death
Deutsches Requiem
Avveroës' Search
The Zahir
The Writing of the God
Ibn-Hakam al-Bokhari, Murdered in His Labyrinth
The Two Kings and the Two Labyrinths
The Wait
The Man on the Threshold
The Aleph
Afterword

The Maker (1960)
Foreword: For Leopoldo Lugones
The Maker
Dreamtigers
A Dialog About a Dialog
Toenails
Covered Mirrors
Argumentum Ornithologicum
The Captive
The Mountebank
Delia Elena San Marco
A Dialog Between Dead Men
The Plot
A Problem
The Yellow Rose
The Witness
Martin Fierro
Mutations
Parable of Cervantes and the Quixote
Paradiso, XXXI, 108
Parable of the Palace
Everything and Nothing
Ragnarök
Inferno, I, 32
Borges and I

Museum
On Exactitude in Science
In Memoriam, J.F.K.
Afterword

In Praise of Darkness (1969)
Foreword
The Ethnographer
Pedro Salvadores
Legend
A Prayer
His End and His Beginning

Brodie's Report (1970)
Foreword
The Interloper
Unworthy
The Story from Rosendo Juárez
The Encounter
Juan Muraña
The Elderly Lady
The Duel
The Other Duel
Guayaquil
The Gospel According to Mark
Brodie's Report

The Book of Sand (1975)
The Other
Ulrikke
The Congress
There Are More Things
The Sect of the Thirty
The Night of the Gifts
The Mirror and the Mask
"Undr"
A Weary Man's Utopia
The Bribe
Avelino Arredondo
The Disk
The Book of Sand
Afterword

Shakespeare's Memory (1983)
August 25, 1983
Blue Tigers
The Rose of Paracelsus
Shakespeare's Memory

A Note on the Translation
Acknowledgments
Notes to the Fictions

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“A marvelous new collection of stories by one of the most remarkable writers of our century.” —Richard Bernstein, The New York Times

“The major work of probably the most influential Latin American writer of the century.” —Michael Dirda, The Washington Post Book World

“An unparalleled treasury of marvels . . . Along with a tiny cohort of peers, and seers (Kafka and Joyce come to mind), Borges is more than a stunning storyteller and a brilliant stylist; he’s a mirror who reflects the spirit of his time.” —Melvin Jules Bukiet, Chicago Tribune

“An event worth of celebration . . . Hurley deserves our enthusiastic praise for this monumental piece of work.” —William Hjortsberg, San Francisco Chronicle

“Borges is the most important Spanish-language writer since Cervantes. . . . To have denied him the Nobel Prize is as bad as the case of Joyce, Proust, and Kafka.” —Mario Vargas Llosa

“When I read a good book, I sometimes like to think I might be capable of writing something similar, but never, in my wildest dreams, could I write anything that approaches the level of cleverness and intellect and madness of Borges. I don’t think anyone could.” —Daniel Radcliffe

 

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Collected Fictions 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
73nk More than 1 year ago
Let me put it this way. What The Beatles did for contemporary music with Rubber Soul, Revolver and Sgt. Pepper's, Borges did to contemporary literature with The Garden of Forking Paths, Artifices and The Aleph. In his works he displays both creativity and erudition, complemented with a singular style of narration that will have you believe all sort of fictional societies, books and mystical artifacts to be true. Make no mistake: political reasons kept him from being awarded the Nobel prize in literature, but he remained a strong contestant for almost 30 years in a row. Many authors and critics consider him to be one of the best and most influential writers not only in Spanish, but in any language.
Devine_OmegaAS More than 1 year ago
Borges is a master in the art of fiction and illustrates it with peculiar ease in this potent and ravishing collection containing most of his lifetime's work. His writing is style is unparallel to any other author whether past or modern. From beginning to end the pages unleash Borges' life long self-taught philosophy pertaining currency, religion as well as politics while dazzling readers with his uncharacteristic ability to amusingly entertain his audience to a higher level of profound literature.
Devine_Omega More than 1 year ago
Borges is a master in the art of fiction and illustrates it with peculiar ease in this potent and ravishing collection containing most of his lifetime's work. His writing is style is unparallel to any other author whether past or modern. From beginning to end the pages unleash Borges' life long self-taught philosophy pertaining currency, religion as well as politics while dazzling readers with his uncharacteristic ability to amusingly entertain his audience to a higher level of profound literature.
Suspicious_Package More than 1 year ago
Borges' genius seems bottomless. He is the heir to Kafka and the grandfather to many of this generation's finest writers. Unlike many writers who rely on imagery, Borges employs the unexpected paradox and the yawningly expansive metaphor.

A quick note about the binding of this volume. This is a quite comprehensive collection which you're gonna wanna read a ton of times! One thing about this book that doesn't come across in the photo is that it's a beautiful object. The pages are cut in that ragged old school way. The paper is heavy. The cover is paper but has a nice durable heft to it. When people see a book like this on your shelf, on your desk or in your hand, they will admire your intellect and ask you all kinds of questions about what you've read and you will be so happy to tell them. Many other people have read these stories and if you meet them you can each share your appreciation and competing interpretations. I can't believe the price. There is simply no reason not to buy this book right now!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Borges is a genius. The stories contained in this edition (Penguin 1999) include the best of his prose work. Of course I recommend that everyone read the beautifully captured reflections of this book, but unfortunately this particular translation leaves too much to be desired. I only say too much because of the disparity between the original spanish and the offered translation. No obstante, you have to use what you can, and Borges' work is worth the compromise of translation. If at all possible, read the spanish, even if you struggle. You'll improve.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I keep coming back to the Collected Fictions. It always leaves me satisfied. Borges plays his little tricks with image and memory and thereby lets the reader into alternate universes. There is always a new twist, always another sublte subversion of reality. I love this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Idea that Ultimate Beauty, Ultimate Truth, And Ultimate enlightenment is possible drives this Author. These things That stay just outside our reach everyday, every year, Century after Century have been Idolized in every culture, and are brought to light on every page.
Zohrab on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Excellent book of collected stories of borges. Opens a window to the world of South America during the times of knight fighting, revolutions and tango
falc0n2600 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I don't know if I'll ever fully finish this monstrosity. The stories may be short, but every one of them takes some time, and makes you feel accomplished after finishing their two or ten pages.
AndrewBlackman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If I have to summarise very briefly what I love about this book, it's that it completely redefines what short stories can be. Many of them are not stories - they take non-fiction forms, or deliberately misquote from other books. He plays with form and narrative structure, writes mysteries and detective stories as high literature, and has stories with no real plot at all, just ideas played with at length. And throughout, the voice is compelling and assured, so that you stick with him through all the experiments and deceits and frustrations, just because you want to hear what he has to say next.
Stodelay on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Borges is a master of the essay, of short fiction, and a wizard at weaving deeply memorable stories out of his philosophical obsessions. With Neruda, my favorite Latin American writer, certainly my favorite prose writer from the Southern Hemisphere. If you like labyrinths, imaginary worlds, texts, mirrors, and gardens of forking paths (or even if you don't), this book will astound you.
dogrover on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Borges's short stories twist in the grasp like live fish, muscular and foreign. In the space of a few pages, or paragraphs, he sketches worlds (complete with gods and those who no longer believe in them, with base fools who become kings, or with an infinity of moments noticed only on the verge of death), and then leaves them to wisp away like smoke, or to sink into the bloodstream and resurface, unrecognizable, years later.I work my way carefully through this collection every few years, only to be surprised again at Borges's ability to be both sly and bold in the same sentence, and at his straight-forward approach to the unknowable.
fundevogel on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Well, I finally finished Borges: Collected Fictions which I've been reading off and on for over a year. The book contains every work of fiction Borges ever wrote, reprinting each volume in sequence. Consequently, having completed it, I now feel like I have inadvertently witnessed the life and death of Borges. It made finishing the book difficult and depressing.The problem is, brilliant as Borges was he shines most fiercely in his most celebrated work [Ficciones]. Ficciones deserves it. It contains the strongest collection of stories of all of his books. This is where you will find "The Lottery of Babylon", "The Library of Babel", "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote" and, my favorite, "Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius", a summary of a book that doesn't exist about a world that never existed. The quality of his writing begins a subtle decline immediately after Ficciones. To be sure he wrote some very fine stories after Ficciones, "Death and the Compass", "The Gospel According to Mark", and "Brodie's Report" to name a few. But these are buried deeply among lesser stories. These lesser stories preserve the familiar themes (tigers, gauchos, knife fights, labyrinths, magical objects, etc.) and the air of intellectualism, but contain no real insight or invention of their own. The further I went the more I felt I was being sold a bill of goods, that Borges was trying to pass off pseudo-intellectualisms as the real thing on the laurels of his past accomplishments. My suspicions were all but confirmed by a line in one of his later stories ("August 25, 1983"), "I was taken for a clumsy imitator of Borges--a person who had the defect of not actually being Borges yet of mirroring all the outward appearances of the original." And that really sums it up, Borges fell into to sort of imitation of himself, his airs and themes, but lost his grip on the interesting ideas that had driven them. It's quite sad really.I speculated on what was behind the decline of his writing and always came back to two things. The first was the loss of his eyesight. Borges went blind later in his life and the subject of blindness and impaired vision comes up a few times in his later writings. I can't imagine how difficult it would be for a blind man to do rewrites and editing and I imagine this impediment took it's toll on his writing. The second is that Borges seems to have had an almost 180 degree shift in his philosophy. His early works use mystical elements as metaphor or framework for philosophical and intellectual puzzles, but his later works often just glorify mysticism and faith in mysticism. This is probably the part that frustrated me most about his later works, because it sees what had been used as an effective package for complex and interesting ideas become the focus of the story. It's like presenting an blown out eggshell as if it as substantive as a whole egg.I apologize for how down on Borges this review has been. It's just very difficult to face a talented writer stagnating and fading away. I do whole-heartedly recommend Ficciones. Borges did write some unforgettable stories, he just couldn't keep it up for a lifetime.
jddunn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Stories about books within books. Infinite, perfectly symmetrical, recursive, eerie stories. Flights of allusional fancy. Poe mixed with Joyce mixed with Dali, armed with an enormous, multilingual vocabulary and multicultural semiology(and an apparently intimate knowledge of everything ever written in every Western language, and some of the Eastern ones), and yet somehow still eminently readable and engaging and humorous. Good stuff, in other words.
Malum on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Of the many authors that I swear by, some staples in the world of fiction and some out there on the fringe, none encompass more of the beauty, pain, and depth of writing than Jorge Luis Borges. His collected fictions are full of everything the human mind can love, fear, and mimic to try to make itself feel real.Though some individual stories within the collection can be somewhat tedious, overdetailed with specific place names and dates that aren't entirely relevent to the story, there is always something of note, value, and originality in even the worst of the tales. To put it simply, I have bought this collection three times because I have twice felt the overwhelming need to give it away to someone who may be enriched by it, and refused to take it back once it was given. I have twice chosen to pay such a great collection forward, and regret neither time.
juv3nal on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
magical. no one has any business writing short stories without having read these.
NativeRoses on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i loaned away my copy recently and NEVER got it back, so, yeah, it's on my wishlist now. Not "vague surrealism," Borges has penetrating metaphorical insight into human nature. The Writing of the God is one of the most scalp-crinkling mystical stories ever ~ next to which the epiphanies of Joyce or redemptions of O'Connor seem pallid and crude. Amazing how many writers fashion entire careers stealing from Borges.
Scott_Wells on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A complete, one volume collection of ALL of the Argentine Literary Genius' short stories. All his 'Games with Time and Infinity'are to be found in here, along with complete collections like 'A Universal History of Infamy' and his unfinished 'Shakespeare's Memories'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago