Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes

Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes

by David B. Beckwith

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Overview

DAVID B. BECKWITH was born in Cumbria,
U.K. His family emigrated to Perth, Western
Australia in 1969. He studied Mathematics and Philosophy at the University of W.A. He is now a retired I.T. Professional, also a polyglot,
a polymath, cook, painter, and an avid traveller
(having circumnavigated the globe, visited
Antarctica, and spent more than six months in
Central & South America). He lives in a rural region bordering to the metropolitan area of Perth where he and his wife grow vegetables and raise chickens for eggs. David makes cheeses and fruit wines, when he is not writing Sherlock Holmes

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781456869397
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
Publication date: 03/16/2011
Pages: 200
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.46(d)

About the Author

David B. Beckwith was born in Cumbria, U.K. His family emigrated to Perth, Western Australia in 1969. He studied Mathematics and Philosophy at the University of W.A. He is now a retired I.T. Professional, also a polyglot, a polymath, cook, and an avid traveller (having circumnavigated the globe, visited Antarctica, and spent more than six months in Central & South America. He lives in a rural region bordering to the metropolititan area of Perth where he and his wife grow vegetables and raise chickens for eggs. David makes cheeses and fruit wines, when he is not writing Sherlock Holmes.

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Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Philip_K_Jones More than 1 year ago
This book is the first collection of Sherlockian tales by the author. Comments are made in the notes that indicate that other books are planned. This volume contains five stories, one short story and four novellas. The first story is a novella titled "The Case of the Scotched, Soused, & Strung Scotsman." It is a classic 'locked-room' mystery, presented with Holmes and Watson rushing off to Scotland in familiar fashion. The death is assumed to be a suicide and the Inspector in charge leaves much to be desired. The second tale, "Dr. Watson & the Cartomancer," is a short story that starts with Dr. Watson's friend, Conan Doyle, asking him to attend a Tarot reading to assess the reader's accuracy and abilities. Watson is dissatisfied, but cannot explain the results, so he describes the 'reading' to Holmes, some years later. Holmes explains the card reader's methods to both Watson and the audience. "The Colonial Conspiracy" is a novella that presents another 'locked room' mystery. In addition, there are coded messages being passed back and forth, Mycroft representing Her Majesty's Government and Harry Potter, a gardener with 'magic fingers for the roses.' As is common in tales of Holmes, things are not what they seem. The 'locked room' is not empty, the coded notes are no mystery and Mycroft cannot affect the Government's actions. "Bertie" is a novella that tells of a long-term assignment for Holmes to watch and protect His Majesty Edward VIII during the beginning of his reign. It presents a somewhat unconventional portrait of "the first Gentleman of Europe." Much of the material is not consistent with the usual Royal portrait and contradicts many of the Government 'news releases' of the times. The author seems to take his data quite seriously. Perhaps readers should do so as well. The final novella recounts Holmes and Watson's effort to apprehend 'Saucy Jack.' It is clear that the solution offered is only fiction, but parallels to reality are pointed out with distressing frequency, so one may assume that story is really aimed at a similar but different villain. This book is readable, with reasonable editing and assumptions. I could find no more than ten or twelve minor errors and the stories were all enjoyable. Let's hope the author follows up with another volume in the near future. Reviewed by: Philip K. Jones, May, 2011