C. S. Lewis: A Biography

C. S. Lewis: A Biography

by A. N. Wilson

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Overview

A subtle and poignant portrayal of the creator of The Chronicles of Narnia.


Brilliant. Agnostic. Prejudiced. Gregarious. Bullying. Loyal friend. Heavy drinker. One of the most learned scholars of his generation. A controversial Christian apologist. Author of a children's fantasy that has sold millions upon millions of copies. And, after his death, almost a cult figure. C. S. Lewis was an incredibly complicated man, and, as revealed in this splendid biography, a mystery to those who knew him best. "I know of no modern biographer who equals Wilson's delicacy of touch and sensitivity to human quandaries. An astonishing book."—Leon Edel "The mixture presented in Wilson's biography of the life of learning...of domestic drama and bad temper, religion, and sex, is irresistible."—New York Review of Books

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393323405
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 08/01/2002
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 616,306
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

A. N. Wilson is the author of the acclaimed biographies Tolstoy, C. S. Lewis, Jesus, and Paul; God's Funeral, and several celebrated novels. He lives in London.

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C. S. Lewis 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Wilson's fascination about the relationship between Mr. Lewis and Mrs. Moore is rife with speculation and rumor. It's amazing that the author could devote so many words and pages to a work that contains virtually nothing new about the Twentieth Century's foremost Christian Apologist. This book does however have one utilitarian function. It makes, one page at a time, wonderful bird cage liner.
pairodimes on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While I certainly don't think a biography should whitewash the failures of the main character, I do think that the author should know somewhat of that which he speaks. Wilson paints the picture that Lewis was infantile/immature, misogynistic, incoherent in his internal beliefs and faith, had a penchant for masochistic sex, and a load of other Freudian-tinted issues. There were a few redeeming things about the book, i.e. his coverage of some of Lewis' academic works. Essentially all things relating to faith and personal life portrayed Lewis as a near idiot. It was also obvious that the author thought little of conservative, orthodox Christian doctrine and to the extent that Lewis believed it, he was made to look ridiculous. Overall, this may balance out some of the works that make Lewis out to be a saint, but to me the author appears extremely biased and deprecates Lewis' character, thought, and abilities at every opportunity in a condescending manner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I need 911 sirecly