Batman Nightwalker: The Graphic Novel

Batman Nightwalker: The Graphic Novel

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Overview

This action-packed graphic novel based on the New York Times bestselling novel by Marie Lu transports readers to the shadowy gates of Arkham Asylum, where Gotham City's darkest mysteries reside...and now it threatens to imprison young Bruce Wayne.

This action-packed graphic novel based on the New York Times bestselling book by Marie Lu transports readers to the shadowy gates of Arkham Asylum, where Gotham City's darkest mysteries reside...and which now threatens to imprison Bruce Wayne.

A ruthless new gang of criminals known only as Nightwalkers is terrorizing Gotham and the city's elite are being taken out one by one. On the way home from his 18th birthday party, newly minted billionaire Bruce Wayne makes an impulsive choice that puts him in their crosshairs and lands him in Arkham Asylum, the once-infamous mental hospital. There he meets Madeleine Wallace, a brilliant killer...and Bruce's only hope. Madeleine is the mystery Bruce must unravel, but is he convincing her to divulge her secrets or is he feeding her the information she needs to bring Gotham City to its knees?

Adapted by Stuart Moore and illustrated by Chris Wildgoose, this graphic novel presents a thrilling new take on Batman before he donned the cape and cowl.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781401280048
Publisher: DC Comics
Publication date: 10/01/2019
Pages: 208
Sales rank: 64,817
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Marie Lu is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Legend trilogy and The Young Elites trilogy. She graduated from the University of Southern California and jumped into the video game industry, working for Disney Interactive Studios as a Flash artist. Now a full-time writer, she spends her spare time reading, drawing, playing Assassin's Creed, and getting stuck in traffic. She lives in Los Angeles, California (see above: traffic), with one husband, one Chihuahua mix, and two Pembroke Welsh corgis.

Read an Excerpt

The blood underneath her nails bothered her.
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Batman: Nightwalker"
by .
Copyright © 2019 Marie Lu.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Children's Books.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Batman Nightwalker: The Graphic Novel 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Little_MissDQ 12 days ago
I was never much of a Batman fan, but I did want to give the original novel a chance after meeting Marie Lu at an event and going on about looking forward to the upcoming Wonder Woman novel (she brought it up after I told her my name) then not remembering until I got home that she was also writing a book for the series. I figured this graphic novel was the best way to read it and also deiced if I want to try out the novel now that I've gotten to know Bruce a little bit. I think I would like to spend some more time with the story. Marie Lu did a great job setting up who Bruce is and who he wants to be. And I definitely came around towards a character I was completely indifferent to.
QuirkyCat 23 days ago
Batman: Nightwalker now has a graphic novel adaptation for us to enjoy! If you read and loved Marie Lu's take on Batman and his earlier days, then odds are good that you'll find yourself enjoying the graphic novel version as well. Stuart Moore and Chris Wildgoose were brought on for this project, one doing the adaptation (editing down the book into a shorter format, that sort of thing) and the other as the artist. And I've got to say, they did a pretty solid job. For those not familiar with Batman: Nightwalker, it's part of the DC Icons series, delving into the past of our beloved heroes. In this case, the focus was on Batman, or rather, on Bruce Wayne before he became Batman. It turns out that Bruce was always a bit of a reckless teenager, which makes sense given the path he'll eventually head down. Here is his first experience with crime fighting – and it explains so much about how he eventually became the masked hero we adore. Bruce Wayne has found himself in the center of a whole new crime mystery. The Nightwalkers have been targeting the rich, but unlike their Robin Hood inspiration, they're not giving to the poor. They are, however, happily killing the rich they steal from. Madeleine Wallace is the only break in the ranks – the only member to be arrested and not die within hours of said arrest. And she's become fixated on Bruce. Or is it that Bruce has a fixation with her? Batman: Nightwalker was a brilliant and animated read on all accounts. Seeing it in graphic novel format only helped to heighten certain elements. You can really see that this plot was designed with a more visual format in mind, as it adapted so well. Visually speaking, there were certain elements that I absolutely adored. For example, most of the graphic novel was in black and white, but there were exceptions. Anything that the creative team wanted us to pay specific attention to was highlighted in a vibrant yellow. This was striking, to begin with, naturally. But some scenes were amazing thanks to this one small change – such as the moments with origami. I also adored the design of the breaks between parts. It was dark, yet oddly elegant. It was a perfect fit for this dark and brooding tale, that's for sure. And it fit in nicely with the artwork as well. Speaking of the artwork, I absolutely adored the character designs in this graphic novel. I know that the artists had something to lean on, knowing how some of these characters would look in later years. But they were able to do what they wanted with their more youthful versions, and I think they did a brilliant job. Bruce, in particular, looked like the pretty and rich boy we all expected – with a complete lack of fear of getting beat up, of course. I'm really pleased with how this adaptation came out, on the whole. I can't wait to see what the rest of the series is going to end up looking like. And I might have to go back and reread the original novel after this.
Bruce_Arrington 23 days ago
Batman: Nightwalker, is the story of the younger Bruce Wayne, when he turns 18 and begins his rise in Wayne Enterprises, while trying to stop a rogue group of criminals with a huge grudge against the rich people of Gotham City. They threaten to destabilize the city, but can the young Bruce Wayne intervene and save the day? The portrayal of the young Wayne is excellent. He isn't a snobby rich kid, but a soft-hearted soul who genuinely wants to help people. This made me root for him more than any of the other Batman comics I've read. The artwork is excellent and I found myself unable to simply put the story down. It's a fairly quick read that will bring plenty of entertainment to its readers. Highly recommended.
HBB_Reviews 23 days ago
What made the original text-only novel by Marie Lu so enticing to fans was that it was an entirely new and original story, chronicling the early years of Bruce Wayne’s life and his eventual turn to being the Caped Crusader. Indeed, Lu’s novel was seen as a pioneering feat for the character in the literary space, providing one of the very few novels on the character in history. And with such a success, it’s no surprise that DC has taken the initiative to adapt the novel into its own graphic novel by the hands of Stuart Moore (The Zodiac Legacy: Convergence) and the inspired art of Chris Wildgoose. Coupled together, this graphic novel adaptation faithfully recreates everything that Lu did so well with the original novel…and everything that Lu was deficient at. Yes, Batman: Nightwalker in graphic novel form doesn’t add or fix anything in relation to its original source material, causing it to come off a tad underwhelming. Its cartoonish and Alex Rider-like nature lends itself to Moore’s dialogue and even more so to Wildgoose’s anime-esque art. It’s an art style that uses colors sparingly, most of the time relying on a strictly black-and-white color scheme, but its outlandish charm can’t quite save the rest of the novel from devolving into a dull and drab contraption, fiercely bent on delivering mediocrity. Following Bruce Wayne on the verge of graduating from high school and at the age of eighteen, Lu’s original narrative made smart use on Wayne’s position in adolescence. He regularly deals with teenagers in the traditionally “teenage” way and is quick to develop romantic feelings and crushes on girls he meets. Despite readers being able to see the underlying potential for the character to develop into the Dark Knight, Lu grounded Wayne and the rest of the characters in a spot that no other stories in recent memories tackled. However, due to the book quite literally having the name “Batman” in it, both the original novel and this new graphic novel adaptation are reliant on fan service and pointing out, in possibly the most unsubtle method, how this eighteen-year-old Bruce Wayne will become the Caped Crusader in future years. This means that this version of the character turns into something of a mini version of Batman himself. From dodging flying bullets to fighting off enemies and prisoners to thrusting himself right into the middle of a massive crime investigation, it’s all ridiculous and unbelievable that he’s able to walk away from it in the end since he is an untrained eighteen-year-old. It’s clear that many of the “action sequences” took inspiration from other Batman stories, but that’s just the problem. This main protagonist isn’t Batman or anywhere close to him, and that’s a statement that Lu’s novel and Moore’s adaptation frequently forgets. But the outlandishness of the plot aside, there are some redeeming factors here, most of which coming from Wildgoose’s excellent art. While Moore and Lu may not remember it from time to time, Wildgoose certainly recognizes where Bruce Wayne is at in his life, and the art reflects so. In relation to other distinct Batman illustrators like Greg Capullo with Scott Snyder’s expertly told and written The Court of Owls, Wildgoose’s framed illustrations look almost juvenile and underdeveloped and intentionally so. Color is excluded in all of the scenes other than key ones, dawning on the reader the sharp transition the characters make in the fast-paced and snappy 210 pages in length. #NetGalley
moo77hb 3 months ago
A Batman graphic Novel written by Marie Lu, I didn't have to think twice before requesting this title! I love her books and my teen is a huge Batman fan. We loved the story and this new take on the dark knight. The illustrations are fantastic and really kept us engaged. This is really the story of a young Bruce Wayne on the cusp of starting his life as an adult. He has extra challenges being super rich and an orphan. But he seems to have good friends and of course Alfred to help him along the way. Great action and story telling. All of the characters were interesting. I loved the whole look of the graphic novel. It is in black and white with blue tones, once in a while something yellow to get your attention. The style is really stunning and we enjoyed it! I want to thank Netgalley and the publisher for our free copy of this graphic novel in exchange for our honest opinions!
LibraryTeacher 3 months ago
Batman: Nightwalker (The Graphic Novel) begins with a young Bruce Wayne inheriting the fortune of his deceased parents. At the same time, a criminal group called The Nightwalkers is menacing the wealthy citizens of Gotham. As he travels through the city, Wayne observes police cars in pursuit. He follows them and realizes that The Nightwalkers are going to get away, so he intervenes. The police do not view Wayne's participation in the capture of The Nightwalkers positively and Wayne is sentenced to spend the summer doing community service at Arkham Asylum. At Arkham, Bruce Wayne meets one of The Nightwalkers that was arrested, Madeline. Wayne believes that there is more to Madeline than her criminal past and he conducts an investigation of his own to discover who she really is. The illustrations add to the graphic novel by portraying the emotions of the characters effectively. The majority of the illustrations are done in black in white, but the occasional yellow serves to highlight especially climatic scenes. The graphic novel is filled with action and fans of the DC Icons series will enjoy this book as well. It was an interesting portrayal of the beginning of the journey Bruce Wayne takes toward becoming Batman. #BatmanNightwalkerTheGraphicNovel #NetGalley
LibraryTeacher 3 months ago
Batman: Nightwalker (The Graphic Novel) begins with a young Bruce Wayne inheriting the fortune of his deceased parents. At the same time, a criminal group called The Nightwalkers is menacing the wealthy citizens of Gotham. As he travels through the city, Wayne observes police cars in pursuit. He follows them and realizes that The Nightwalkers are going to get away, so he intervenes. The police do not view Wayne's participation in the capture of The Nightwalkers positively and Wayne is sentenced to spend the summer doing community service at Arkham Asylum. At Arkham, Bruce Wayne meets one of The Nightwalkers that was arrested, Madeline. Wayne believes that there is more to Madeline than her criminal past and he conducts an investigation of his own to discover who she really is. The illustrations add to the graphic novel by portraying the emotions of the characters effectively. The majority of the illustrations are done in black in white, but the occasional yellow serves to highlight especially climatic scenes. The graphic novel is filled with action and fans of the DC Icons series will enjoy this book as well. It was an interesting portrayal of the beginning of the journey Bruce Wayne takes toward becoming Batman. #BatmanNightwalkerTheGraphicNovel #NetGalley
TeresaReviews 3 months ago
I actually already had Batman: Nightwalker (The Graphic Novel) pre-ordered by the time I was approved for this book, so technically, my review is of the final published product, though thank you NetGalley, Marie Lu, and DC Entertainment for selecting me as one of your readers! I had every intention of buying this book because Marie Lu is my number one favorite author! I have all of her books, including the original novelization of Batman: Nightwalker, though it is the only book of hers I haven't yet read. When I saw the graphic novel was becoming a reality, I figured I would read that and then get back to her regular novel sometime in the future...I mean, we all know my reading list is a literal mountain. I really enjoyed the art style. The blue color scheme really fit the mood of Batman. It was fun to see Bruce Wayne still in his teenage years, having just graduated high school and inherited his billions of dollars. We also see a young Harvy, among other characters we know from Batman's time as the protector of Gotham City. The Nightwalkers are a group of people (villains) dedicated to taking money from the rich and redistributing it, since no ingle person should have so much money and power over others. The bigger problem is that they usually kill the moneyholders. And Bruce is on their list. Wanting to put an end to the Nightwalkers (or find out more), Bruce pursues one of the members only to wind up in a car crash and placed on probation at Arkham Asylum to help clean the facilities, among other work. There he meets Madeline Wallace, one of the members of the Nightwalkers. She only speaks to him, and he begins to fall for her. There are two problems with this: Bruce can never distinguish what is truth and lie with Madeline, and a relationship between a hero and a villain can never truly work out...can it? This graphic novel has fantastic art, a great story, and potential for a future installment. It was aslo nice to see the Leigh Bordugo Wonder Woman graphic novel excerpt in the back...and the title that Sarah J. Maas's Catwoman will likewise become a graphic novel as well! How exciting! If you can't tell, I highly recommend this graphic novel to young readers. Fans of Batman might be a bit skeptical, but I've only ever read a vew highly exquisite Batman comics, and this is one of them!
Horsebranchjess 3 months ago
Batman: Nightwalker is a cool new take on Batman's origins. A young Bruce Wayne turns eighteen and inherits his family's money and all the responsibility that comes with it. When faced with an opportunity to stop bad guys, the young Bruce jumps at the chance even using Waynetech technology to put the hurt on villains. The story is told in a way that the reader can see the development of Batman from Bruce's experiences. An action packed, page turner, the story will be enjoyed by young and old for an entertaining chapter in Batman's life story. The art is skillfully drawn and monochromatic to place the emphasis on the important aspects of the story. I loved it. My voluntary, unbiased review is based on a review copy from Netgalley.
JuliW 3 months ago
My parents did not approve of comic books. I wasn't allowed to read 99% of the titles on the shelf at the drug store (the only shop that sold comics in the little town I grew up in). Allowable titles were mostly Disney. Huey, Dewey and Louie are cute....and I loved all the comics I was allowed to read.... but the exciting, more mainstream characters were off limits for me. To this day, I don't really understand why. Superman, Batman and the other superheroes were fighting to save humanity, right? I guess it fell somewhere between "Violence and fighting are bad'' and "Girls don't read comic books.'' I think they were hoping I would turn into a dress-loving, girlie girl if they kept me away from what I naturally gravitated to....but it didn't work. I was always up a tree in the yard reading a book or chasing the neighbor kid with a garter snake. (In my defense, the kid was annoying.....sometimes the only way to get rid of him was to chase him with a snake.) So......the end result....I was an adult, and married to a long-time comic book enthusiast, before I ever really delved much into comic books and superheroes. This leaves me out of many nerd debate topics on cannon, reboots, different artists, weird plot tangents, etc. I just read and enjoy. With slight rants about some of the horrible movies, I love Batman. What's not to love about a billionaire businessman who has every freaking cool gadget ever invented....plus an awesome cave lair. My point is this -- I don't know cannon or most past plots from the comic book world -- Marvel or DC. I just love the characters, the art, and the storylines! So I jump on every graphic novel I can get my hands on that involves superheroes.....Love, love, love! I thoroughly enjoyed Batman: Nightwalker! The storyline features a young, 18-year old Bruce Wayne who has just come into his fortune. A group of thieves is targeting wealthy residents of Gotham. The Nightwalkers start out stealing money from the wealthiest of the wealthy.....but they quickly descend into more violent actions like murder, blowing up buildings, etc. Bruce tries to talk to one of the captured Nightwalkers who sits in a cell at Arkham Asylum. She refuses to say one word to anybody, but Bruce gets to know her. He discovers that there really is only a fine line between his brand of vigilante and the Nightwalkers..... I have never read the book this graphic novel is based on. I did however see much ranting about it online. And promptly ignored most of it. This is a young version of Bruce Wayne. He's a teen and trying to cope with the loss of his parents, coming into his wealth and figuring out what to do with himself. He's feeling a bit of angst....gets into trouble.... and ends up serving community service in Arkham of all places. And he meets someone who confuses and intrigues him. I enjoyed seeing his character develop. He makes a decision to use his drive to better the world in a positive way, rather than delving into the dark side of a more criminal element. It's a YA Batman story....with some nice tech elements (drones, robots, etc) and interesting "bad guys'' thrown in. I enjoyed the story. The muted colors of the artwork was awesome! And I liked the message. Even superhero billionaires have to discover who they are at some point -- Batman included. I can see this version of the character as a nice update to the present. Looking forward to the next Marie Lu graphic novel! **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of thi
SkyeWright 3 months ago
Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher I was able to read this book in exchange for an honest review. *** Batman: Nightwalker is a graphic adaptation of the book with the same name by Marie Lu. It was a fun ride with teenaged Bruce struggling to understand what he wants out of life and where he wants to go in it. With best friends Dianne and Harvey, as well as the constant Alfred, Bruce is in a good place for this. On Bruce’s 18th birthday he gets into trouble interfering with a police chase and has to serve community service at Arkham Asylum where he meets Madeleine, a member of the infamous Nightwalker’s, who starts to talk to him. Is Bruce getting the truth or lies from her? He’s going to have to figure it out quick because the Nightwalkers are escalating and Bruce Wayne may not be safe from their list.
CaraAlwaysReading 3 months ago
Adapted from the successful DC Icons book, the graphic novel of Marie Lu’s “Batman: Nightwalker” beautifully translates the woes and throws of young Bruce Wayne’s life as a pawn in a deadly game. Stuart Moore (author of Marvel’s “Civil War”) and Christian Wildgoose (artist on DC’s Batgirl Rebirth line) handle Lu’s crafted work with a delicacy and respect that their names are sure to become synonymous with the Caped Crusader. Now, I’ve personally already read Marie Lu’s original novel and enjoyed it immensely. In fact, it’s my second favorite of the DC Icons line. So, when I saw that DC Ink was finally bringing this masterpiece to the panel, I immediately jumped on the opportunity to read it. I was not disappointed. The story begins with a young Bruce Wayne who has just turned 18 and given access to his trust fund (you’d think this isn’t important, but trust funds are actually critical in the plot). On the night Bruce is supposed to be making a good impression to the press as a new adult, he, unfortunately, finds himself into some trouble – legal trouble. Thus, our story takes off (and I can’t say any more because I’m a spoiler queen, aha)! For me, the biggest concern of this adaptation was whether or not Moore and Wildgoose would stay true to the source material. In the past, multiple writers have attempted to take such a huge chunk of material and cram it into a 200-page graphic novel – unsuccessfully. In doing so, they usually leave pertinent information out or create their own to fill in the blanks. Thankfully, none of that happens in this adaptation. True, the story is sped up a bit and can seem rushed at times, but that comes with the territory of paraphrasing a 60,000 word (I’m approximating!) book. Speaking of the story, I’d really like to commend Wildgoose on his phenomenal art. Any reader knows what it is like to imagine the characters and setting of a story, and seeing it brought to life so vividly was astounding. Wildgoose uses no color in his panels, opting for a gray-scale effect that I feel compliments the dreary atmosphere of Arkham Asylum. And don’t even get me started on Bruce! (Is it wrong to crush on a comic book character?) Now, quite a few people have mentioned to me that they never cared for the original “Batman: Nightwalker” for the lack of any actual “Batman.” So, allow me to clear something up: MARIE LU’S BOOK CONTAINS NO BATMAN COSTUME. THIS IS AN ORIGIN STORY. BRUCE WAYNE DID NOT BECOME BATMAN UNTIL HE TURNED 20. So, now knowing this, you can read either of these books (the original or adaptation) without harking on it for lack of the “B-Man.” If you’ve come for the Bat, still stick around. Bruce is just as kick-a** out of costume – trust me. As far as things I didn’t like…I didn’t much care for Dianne. When I first read the original book, I honestly confused her for Wonder Woman for a hot second. I also wish (and this goes for all the DC Icon books) that the story would have crossed over with the other novels. Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman all eventually join the Justice League, so it would make sense to have them meet as children. Those are really my only complaints, though. As for the graphic novel on its own, I think it’s fantastic. If you’re looking for something that’s not too difficult in terms of continuity, definitely pick this one up. (Also, pick up the original; it will give you so much more from these characters!) It’s a “Batman” story that will surely go down as a classic in the books.
marongm8 3 months ago
I received this book as an ARC from DC Comics in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. I have read and loved Batman: Nightwalker the novel by Marie Lu and when I found out that there is a graphic novel to the adaptation, I knew I had to read it. This series is very popular with our teen patrons and the art work was very compelling and so artistically colorful, I was glued from beginning to end. Our teens who are fans of Manga and the DC Superhero series will absolutely love this book and I can not wait to tell them about it. We will consider adding this title to our graphic novel collection at our library. That is why we give this book 5 stars.