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Overview

Aristotle (384–322 BC), the great Greek thinker, researcher, and educator, ranks among the most important and influential figures in the history of philosophy, theology, and science. He joined Plato’s Academy in Athens in 367 and remained there for twenty years. After spending three years at the Asian court of a former pupil, Hermeias, he was appointed by Philip of Macedon in 343/2 to become tutor of his teenaged son, Alexander. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school, the Lyceum at Athens, whose followers were known as the Peripatetics. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling in Athens after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea, where he died in 322.

Aristotle wrote voluminously on a broad range of subjects analytical, practical, and theoretical. Rhetoric, probably composed while he was still a member of Plato’s Academy, is the first systematic approach to persuasive public speaking based in dialectic, on which he had recently written the first manual.

This edition of Aristotle’s Rhetoric, which replaces the original Loeb edition by John Henry Freese, supplies a Greek text based on that of Rudolf Kassel, a fresh translation, and ample annotation fully current with modern scholarship.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780198724254
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 07/01/2018
Series: Oxford World's Classics Series
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 1,243,660
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

John Henry Freese (1852–1930) was Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge.

Gisela Striker is Walter C. Klein Professor of Philosophy and of the Classics, Emerita, at Harvard University.

Table of Contents

The Art of Rhetoric - Aristotle Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Hugh Lawson-Tancred

Preface
Introduction:
1. The Importance of Ancient Rhetoric
2. The Historical Background to the Rhetoric
3. Rhetoric as Techne
4. Psychology in the Rhetoric
5. Style and Composition
6. The Rhetorical Legacy of Aristotle
7. The Translation

THE ART OF RHETORICSection One: Introductory
Chapter 1.1. The Nature of Rhetoric
PART ONE: DEMONSTRATIONSection Two: The Genres of Oratory
Chapter 1.2. The Definition of Rhetoric
Chapter 1.3. The Genres
Section Three: Deliberation
Chapter 1.4. The Province of Deliberation
Chapter 1.5. Happiness
Chapter 1.6. The Good and the Expedient
Chapter 1.7. Relative Expediency
Chapter 1.8. Constitutions
Section Four: Display
Chapter 1.9. Display Oratory
Section Five: Litigation
Chapter 1.10. Injustice
Chapter 1.11. Pleasure
Chapter 1.12. The Criminal Mind
Chapter 1.13. Crime and Punishment
Chapter 1.14. Relatively Serious Crimes
Chapter 1.15. Non-technical Proofs
PART TWO: EMOTION AND CHARACTERSection Six: Emotion
Chapter 2.1. The Role of Emotion and Character
Chapter 2.2. Anger
Chapter 2.3. Calm
Chapter 2.4. Friendship and Enmity
Chapter 2.5. Fear and Confidence
Chapter 2.6. Shame
Chapter 2.7. Favour
Chapter 2.8. Pity
Chapter 2.9. Indignation
Chapter 2.10. Envy
Chapter 2.11. Jealousy
Section Seven: Character
Chapter 2.12. Youth
Chapter 2.13. Old Age
Chapter 2.14. Prime
Chapter 2.15. Birth
Chapter 2.16. Wealth
Chapter 2.17. Power
PART THREE: UNIVERSAL ASPECTSSection Eight: Common Topics
Chapter 2.18. The Role of Common Topics
Chapter 2.19. The Topics of Possibility
Chapter 2.20. Example
Chapter 2.21. Maxim
Chapter 2.22. Enthymeme
Chapter 2.23. Demonstrative Common Topics
Chapter 2.24. Illusory Topics
Chapter 2.25. Refutation
Chapter 2.26. Amplification
Section Nine: Style
Chapter 3.1. Historical Preliminary
Chapter 3.2. Clarity
Chapter 3.3. Frigidity
Chapter 3.4. Simile
Chapter 3.5. Purity
Chapter 3.6. Amplitude
Chapter 3.7. Propriety
Chapter 3.8. Rhythm
Chapter 3.9. Syntax
Chapter 3.10. Wit and Metaphor
Chapter 3.11. Vividness
Chapter 3.12. Suitability to Genre
Section Ten: Composition
Chapter 3.13. Narration and Proof
Chapter 3.14. The Introduction
Chapter 3.15. Prejudice
Chapter 3.16. Narration
Chapter 3.17. Proof and Refutation
Chapter 3.18. Altercation
Chapter 3.19. The Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography

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