Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Centennial Edition)

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Overview

When feisty eleven-year-old Anne Shirley - orphaned, red-headed and freckled - is sent to the Green Gables farm by mistake the farm's elderly owners, brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, are dubious about letting her stay. Anne wins them both over, however, and the adventures that follow as Anne gains an education and grows to adulthood are both touching and amusing.
An instant success when it first appeared, Anne's story has gripped generations of readers old and young since the day it was published and its impact and influence remains profound and undiminished.

"The dearest and most loveable child in fiction since the immortal Alice"
- Mark Twain

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451528827
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/22/2003
Series: Anne of Green Gables Series
Edition description: Centennial Edition
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 23,374
Product dimensions: 4.19(w) x 6.81(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

About the cover artist

Based in Winter Park, Florida, Anna Bond of Rifle Paper Co., a worldwide stationery and gift brand, is an artist best known for her whimsical designs which often include hand-painted illustrations and lettering. She has created unique, illustrated covers for the Puffin in Bloom book collection, which includes such classics as Johanna Spyri's Heidi, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, and A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. 

About the author:

Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942) was a Canadian author  who wrote around 500 short stories and poems, as well as twenty published novels. The years she spent on the beautiful Prince Edward Island influenced her writing and inspired her stories of the loveable, red-headed orphan, Anne Shirley.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

Mrs. Rachel Lynde is Surprised

Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde's Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs. Rachel Lynde's door without due regard for decency and decorum; it probably was conscious that Mrs. Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.

There are plenty of people in Avonlea and out of it, who can attend closely to their neighbor's business by dint of neglecting their own; but Mrs. Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain. She was a notable housewife; her work was always done and well done; she "ran" the Sewing Circle, helped run the Sunday-school, and was the strongest prop of the Church Aid Society and Foreign Missions Auxiliary. Yet with all this Mrs. Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting "cotton warp" quilts – she had knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices – and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond. Since Avonlea occupied a little triangular peninsula jutting out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence with water on two sides of it, anybody who went out of it or into it had to pass over that hill road and so run the unseen gauntlet of Mrs. Rachel's all-seeing eye.

She was sitting there one afternoon in early June. The sun was coming in at the window warm and bright; the orchard on the slope below the house was in a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom, hummed over by a myriad of bees. Thomas Lynde – a meek little man whom Avonlea people called "Rachel Lynde's husband" – was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs. Rachel knew that he ought because she had heard him tell Peter Morrison the evening before in William J. Blair's store over at Carmody that he meant to sow his turnip seed the next afternoon. Peter had asked him, of course, for Matthew Cuthbert had never been known to volunteer information about anything in his whole life.

And yet here was Matthew Cuthbert, at half-past three on the afternoon of a busy day, placidly driving over the hollow and up the hill; moreover, he wore a white collar and his best suit of clothes, which was plain proof that he was going out of Avonlea; and he had the buggy and the sorrel mare, which betokened that he was going a considerable distance. Now, where was Matthew Cuthbert going and why was he going there?

Had it been any other man in Avonlea, Mrs. Rachel, deftly putting this and that together, might have given a pretty good guess as to both questions. But Matthew so rarely went from home that it must be something pressing and unusual which was taking him; he was the shyest man alive and hated to have to go among strangers or to any place where he might have to talk. Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn't happen often. Mrs. Rachel, ponder as she might, could make nothing of it and her afternoon's enjoyment was spoiled.

"I'll just step over to Green Gables after tea and find out from Marilla where he's gone and why," the worthy woman finally concluded. "He doesn't generally go to town this time of year and he never visits; if he'd run out of turnip seed he wouldn't dress up and take the buggy to go for more; he wasn't driving fast enough to be going for a doctor. Yet something must have happened since last night to start him off. I'm clean puzzled, that's what, and I won't know a minute's peace of mind or conscience until I know what has taken Matthew Cuthbert out of Avonlea today."

Accordingly after tea Mrs. Rachel set out; she had not far to go; the big, rambling, orchard-embowered house where the Cuthberts lived was a scant quarter of a mile up the road from Lynde's Hollow. To be sure, the long lane made it a good deal further. Matthew Cuthbert's father, as shy and silent as his son after him, had got as far away as he possibly could from his fellow men without actually retreating into the woods when he founded his homestead. Green Gables was built at the furthest edge of his cleared land and there it was to this day, barely visible from the main road along which all the other Avonlea houses were so sociably situated. Mrs. Rachel Lynde did not call living in such a place living at all.

"It's just staying, that's what," she said as she stepped along the deep-rutted, grassy lane bordered with wild rose bushes. "It's no wonder Matthew and Marilla are both a little odd, living away back here by themselves. Trees aren't much company, though dear knows if they were there'd be enough of them. I'd ruther look at people. To be sure, they seem contented enough; but then, I suppose, they're used to it. A body can get used to anything, even to being hanged, as the Irishman said."

With this Mrs. Rachel stepped out of the lane into the backyard of Green Gables. Very green and neat and precise was that yard, set about on one side with great patriarchal willows and the other with prim Lombardies. Not a stray stick nor stone was to be seen, for Mrs. Rachel would have seen it if there had been. Privately she was of the opinion that Marilla Cuthbert swept that yard over as often as she swept her house. One could have eaten a meal off the ground without over-brimming the proverbial peck of dirt.

Mrs. Rachel rapped smartly at the kitchen door and stepped in when bidden to do so. The kitchen at Green Gables was a cheerful apartment – or would have been cheerful if it had not been so painfully clean as to give it something of the appearance of an unused parlor. Its windows looked east and west; through the west one, looking out on the back yard, came a flood of mellow June sunlight; but the east one, whence you got a glimpse of the bloom white cherry-trees in the left orchard and nodding, slender birches down in the hollow by the brook, was greened over by a tangle of vines. Here sat Marilla Cuthbert, when she sat at all, always slightly distrustful of sunshine, which seemed to her too dancing and irresponsible a thing for a world which was meant to be taken seriously; and here she sat now, knitting, and the table behind her was laid for supper.

Mrs. Rachel, before she had fairly closed the door, had taken a mental note of everything that was on that table. There were three plates laid, so that Marilla must be expecting some one home with Matthew to tea; but the dishes were everyday dishes and there was only crab-apple preserves and one kind of cake, so that the expected company could not be any particular company. Yet what of Matthew's white collar and the sorrel mare? Mrs. Rachel was getting fairly dizzy with this unusual mystery about quiet, unmysterious Green Gables.

"Good evening, Rachel," Marilla said briskly. "This is a real fine evening, isn't it? Won't you sit down? How are all your folks?"

Something that for lack of any other name might be called friendship existed and always had existed between Marilla Cuthbert and Mrs. Rachel, in spite of – or perhaps because of – their dissimilarity.

Marilla was a tall, thin woman, with angles and without curves; her dark hair showed some gray streaks and was always twisted up in a hard little knot behind with two wire hairpins stuck aggressively through it. She looked like a woman of narrow experience and rigid conscience, which she was; but there was a saving something about her mouth which, if it had been ever so slightly developed, might have been considered indicative of a sense of humor.

"We're all pretty well," said Mrs. Rachel. "I was kind of afraid you weren't, though, when I saw Matthew starting off today. I thought maybe he was going to the doctor's."

Marilla's lips twitched understandingly. She had expected Mrs. Rachel up; she had known that the sight of Matthew jaunting off so unaccountably would be too much for her neighbor's curiosity.

"Oh, no, I'm quite well although I had a bad headache yesterday," she said. "Matthew went to Bright River. We're getting a little boy from an orphan asylum in Nova Scotia and he's coming on the train tonight."

If Marilla had said that Matthew had gone to Bright River to meet a kangaroo from Australia Mrs. Rachel could not have been more astonished. She was actually stricken dumb for five seconds. It was unsupposable that Marilla was making fun of her, but Mrs. Rachel was almost forced to suppose it.

"Are you in earnest, Marilla?" she demanded when voice returned to her.

"Yes, of course," said Marilla, as if getting boys from orphan asylums in Nova Scotia were part of the usual spring work on any well-regulated Avonlea farm instead of being an unheard of innovation.

Mrs. Rachel felt that she had received a severe mental jolt. She thought in exclamation points. A boy! Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of all people adopting a boy! From an orphan asylum! Well, the world was certainly turning upside down! She would be surprised at nothing after this! Nothing!

"What on earth put such a notion into your head?" she demanded disapprovingly.

This had been done without her advice being asked, and must perforce be disapproved.

"Well, we've been thinking about it for some time – all winter in fact," returned Marilla. "Mrs. Alexander Spencer was up here one day before Christmas and she said she was going to get a little girl from the asylum over in Hopeton in the spring. Her cousin lives there and Mrs. Spencer has visited here and knows all about it. So Matthew and I have talked it over off and on ever since. We thought we'd get a boy. Matthew is getting up in years, you know – he's sixty – and he isn't so spry as he once was. His heart troubles him a good deal. And you know how desperate hard it's got to be to get hired help. There's never anybody to be had but those stupid, half-grown little French boys; and as soon as you do get one broke into your ways and taught something he's up and off to the lobster canneries or the States. At first Matthew suggested getting a Home boy. But I said 'no' flat to that. 'They may be all right – I'm not saying they're not – but no London street Arabs for me,' I said. 'Give me a native born at least. There'll be a risk, no matter who we get. But I'll feel easier in my mind and sleep sounder at nights if we get a born Canadian.' So in the end we decided to ask Mrs. Spencer to pick us out one when she went over to get her little girl. We heard last week she was going, so we sent her word by Richard Spencer's folks at Carmody to bring us a smart, likely boy of about ten or eleven. We decided that would be the best age – old enough to be of some use in doing chores right off and young enough to be trained up proper. We mean to give him a good home and schooling. We had a telegram from Mrs. Alexander Spencer today – the mail-man brought it from the station – saying they were coming on the five-thirty train tonight. So Matthew went to Bright River to meet him. Mrs. Spencer will drop him off there. Of course she goes on to White Sands station herself."

Mrs. Rachel prided herself on always speaking her mind; she proceeded to speak it now, having adjusted her mental attitude to this amazing piece of news.

"Well, Marilla, I'll just tell you plain that I think you're doing a mighty foolish thing – a risky thing, that's what. You don't know what you're getting. You're bringing a strange child into your house and home and you don't know a single thing about him nor what his disposition is like nor what sort of parents he had nor how he's likely to turn out. Why, it was only last week I read in the paper how a man and his wife up west of the Island took a boy out of an orphan asylum and he set fire to the house at night – set it on purpose, Marilla – and nearly burnt them to a crisp in their beds. And I know another case where an adopted boy used to suck the eggs – they couldn't break him of it. If you had asked my advice in the matter – which you didn't do, Marilla – I'd have said for mercy's sake not to think of such a thing, that's what."

This Job's comforting seemed neither to offend nor to alarm Marilla. She knitted steadily on.

"I don't deny there's something in what you say, Rachel. I've had some qualms myself. But Matthew was terrible set on it. I could see that, so I gave in. It's so seldom Matthew sets his mind on anything that when he does I always feel it's my duty to give in. And as for the risk, there's risks in pretty near everything a body does in this world. There's risks in people's having children of their own if it comes to that – they don't always turn out well. And then Nova Scotia is right close to the Island. It isn't as if we were getting him from England or the States. He can't be much different from ourselves."

"Well, I hope it will turn out all right," said Mrs. Rachel in a tone that plainly indicated her painful doubts. "Only don't say I didn't warn you if he burns Green Gables down or puts strychnine in the well – I heard of a case over in New Brunswick where an orphan asylum child did that and the whole family died in fearful agonies. Only, it was a girl in that instance."

"Well, we're not getting a girl," said Marilla, as if poisoning wells were a purely feminine accomplishment and not to be dreaded in the case of a boy. "I'd never dream of taking a girl to bring up. I wonder at Mrs. Alexander Spencer for doing it. But there, she wouldn't shrink from adopting a whole orphan asylum if she took it into her head."

Mrs. Rachel would have liked to stay until Matthew came home with his imported orphan. But reflecting that it would be a good two hours at least before his arrival she concluded to go up the road to Robert Bell's and tell the news. It would certainly make a sensation second to none, and Mrs. Rachel dearly loved to make a sensation. So she took herself away, somewhat to Marilla's relief, for the latter felt her doubts and fears reviving under the influence of Mrs. Rachel's pessimism.

"Well, of all things that ever were or will be!" ejaculated Mrs. Rachel when she was safely out in the lane. "It does really seem as if I must be dreaming. Well, I'm sorry for that poor young one and no mistake. Matthew and Marilla don't know anything about children and they'll expect him to be wiser and steadier that his own grandfather, if so be's he ever had a grandfather, which is doubtful. It seems uncanny to think of a child at Green Gables somehow; there's never been one there, for Matthew and Marilla were grown up when the new house was built – if they ever were children, which is hard to believe when one looks at them. I wouldn't be in that orphan's shoes for anything. My, but I pity him, that's what."

So said Mrs. Rachel to the wild rose bushes out of the fulness of her heart; but if she could have seen the child who was waiting patiently at the Bright River station at that very moment her pity would have been still deeper and more profound.

CHAPTER 2

Matthew Cuthbert is surprised

Matthew Cuthbert and the sorrel mare jogged comfortably over the eight miles to Bright River. It was a pretty road, running along between snug farmsteads, with now and again a bit of balsamy fir wood to drive through or a hollow where wild plums hung out their filmy bloom. The air was sweet with the breath of many apple orchards and the meadows sloped away in the distance to horizon mists of pearl and purple; while "The little birds sang as if it were The one day of summer in all the year."

Matthew enjoyed the drive after his own fashion, except during the moments when he met women and had to nod to them – for in Prince Edward island you are supposed to nod to all and sundry you meet on the road whether you know them or not.

Matthew dreaded all women except Marilla and Mrs. Rachel; he had an uncomfortable feeling that the mysterious creatures were secretly laughing at him. He may have been quite right in thinking so, for he was an odd-looking personage, with an ungainly figure and long iron-gray hair that touched his stooping shoulders, and a full, soft brown beard which he had worn ever since he was twenty. In fact, he had looked at twenty very much as he looked at sixty, lacking a little of the grayness.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Anne of Green Gables"
by .
Copyright © 2019 Lucy Maud Montgomery.
Excerpted by permission of Legend Times Ltd.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

1 Mrs Rachel Lynde is Surprised 9

2 Matthew Cuthbert is Surprised 17

3 Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised 30

4 Morning at Green Gables 37

5 Anne's History 44

6 Marilla Makes up Her Mind 50

7 Anne Says Her Prayers 56

8 Anne's Bringing-up is Begun 60

9 Mrs Rachel Lynde is Properly Horrified 68

10 Anne's Apology 75

11 Anne's Impressions of Sunday School 82

12 A Solemn Vow and Promise 88

13 The Delights of Anticipation 94

14 Anne's Confession 99

15 A Tempest in the School Teapot 108

16 Diana is Invited to Tea, with Tragic Results 123

17 A New Interest in Life 134

18 Anne to the Rescue 141

19 A Concert, a Catastrophe and a Confession 151

20 A Good Imagination Gone Wrong 163

21 A New Departure in Flavourings 169

22 Anne is Invited out to Tea 179

23 Anne Comes to Grief in an Affair of Honour 183

24 Miss Stacy and Her Pupils get up a Concert 190

25 Matthew Insists on Puffed Sleeves 195

26 The Story Club is Formed 205

27 Vanity and Vexation of Spirit 212

28 An Unfortunate Lily Maid 219

29 An Epoch in Anne's Life 227

30 The Queen's Class is Organised 236

31 Where the Brook and River Meet 247

32 The Pass List is Out 253

33 The Hotel Concert 261

34 A Queens Girl 271

35 The Winter at Queen's 278

36 The Glory and the Dream 283

37 The Reaper whose Name is Death 289

38 The Bend in the Road 296

Customer Reviews

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Anne of Green Gables 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 480 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so imaginative and original. It is beautiful. The entire series is echanting.
Amy Barlow More than 1 year ago
I read this as a child so I was excited to be able to download it for free. But due to all of the errors in translating to electronic format I was nit able to really enjoy it. I spent more time trying to figure out what words were supposed to be there than just relaxing and enjoying the story. I will have to get a hard copy from my library. Too bad the electronic copy was not reviwed prior to publishing as many people will probably get frustrated before the story is done and move on to something else. Regardless of the errors I love this story and look forward to getting it from my local library as i suggest anyone interested in reading this story to do.
Headina_Book More than 1 year ago
I didn't notice that this was an abridged version (audio mp3) when I ordered it. But I wasn't too concerned until I started listening to it. Being a die hard Anne of Green Gables fan I was extremely disappointed that their idea of shortening the story was to completely cut out key events and rewrite new contrived events that fall flat and do not lend themselves to the dramatic, touching, sometimes comical life of Anne Shirley. That coupled with the squeaky mouse-like voice that the narrator uses for Anne, and I will be searching for a new audio book for Anne of Green Gables to replace this one. This is NOT Lucy Maude Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables...fans be forewarned!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would give it more stars if i posiibly could
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this series. My mother read them, my daughter and now my granddaughters. These are wonderful books for little girls. Recommend highly for all young girls.
Isabella Parker More than 1 year ago
this book is amazing for the price. very few typos very clearly written. soooooooooooooooooooooo cool!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had forgotten how wonderfully enchanting this timeless story was...and is. I first read Anne of Green Gables at the age of 11 now, over 50 years later I still am captivated by the little orphan girl Anne and her adventures on Prince Edward Island. This book carries you back in time to when children lived by their imagination, friendships were lifelong and family came first. Take a day off the computer, no texts or emails, no cell phone distraction and follow the mishaps and charm of this story...I think you'll find yourself wishing you could see the world as it once was. Jp
Lindell Huskey More than 1 year ago
few typos. easy to read. good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne Of Green Gables is a wonderful and amusing book. Anne is a little red-headed girl who comes to live with Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert from the orphanage. It turns out thoughh that they wanted a boy to help Matthew, who is gettinng on in years on the farm. So Marilla prepares to take Anne back to the orphanage, but Matthew has grown to love Anne and begs Marilla to keep Anne
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I finally decided to read this classic story and I was not disappointed. Anne is a forceful spirit, if somewhat exhausting at times. This is a wholesome story that left me wishing that I possessed Anne's indomitable spirit, imagination, and ability to make friends.
Bookworm1FG More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book as a gift for my daughter who had read it as a young person. She was thrilled. Bookworm1FG
mgoodrich718 More than 1 year ago
Anne Of Green Gables By L.M. Montgomery<br /> <br /> 3 Stars<br /> <br /> Anne comes to Avonlea to be adopted by Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert. She is not however what they were expecting. They wanted a boy and she is an outspoken red-headed girl. She wins the Cuthberts over though and they agree to keep her if she minds her manners and can be molded into what they consider a respectable little girl. Anne learns a lot during her time in Avonlea. She goes through many trials during her fight to be accepted by the community. She finally makes a friend in Diana who is her very first true friend. That even goes awry for awhile because Anne's outspoken ways are often misunderstood. This novel tells the struggle of Anne through her becoming a woman.<br /> This is a truly delightful story. Good small town drama. I found myself completely relating to Anne through many of her trials. One being her inability to be seen and not heard even when it was something that was completely against what she believed in. It was also amusing reading how people viewed her red hair or anyone that had it. Not that it's much different now but it was much worse back then. I loved living in Anne's world for a little while.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm thirteen and I totally agree. I have even read Les Miserables (unabridged) so to me Twilight is just plain stupid.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book. I also love the movie! For the movie it is almost exactly like the book exept a couple parts taken out and put into into. They are both really good. My favorite character is Gilbert then its Anne. This is an injoyable book to read and to watch.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book , theres alot of typos and realy easy too read .i totaly recamend it for any age !
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Find out in Anne of Green Gables! This book is a wonderful classic that has enthralled readers for many generations with its compelling plot, well developed characters, vivid writing, and emotions. After reading this book, you will want to sprint to your local library for the next book in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yall need to learn to enjoy the clasics and not rely on those stupidbooks on vampires and zombies and all this twilight crap im 11 and like the clasics
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoever typed this did a horrid job. About 35 pages in the text is so misconstrued that is not understandable. No wonder its free
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So many typos! The title of the book as well as the titles of chapters appear in the middle of pages. My free Kindle copy was much better!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. I've read this over and over throughout my life, and enjoy it the more I read it. By the way, this is a very nice version of this book and doesn't have lots of typos and is not abridged. For some reason all the reviews are for different versions of this book, not this one only.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great story and lovely charm; my granddaughter really liked this!
Prolific-readerAZ More than 1 year ago
My favorite as well and now, my granddaughter's favorite!!!
momtokalli More than 1 year ago
I had always loved this book when I was a child so I jumped at the chance to purchase a copy for my own daughter. Anne of Green Gables is a wonderful story about a young girl named Anne who is up for adoption, and is looking for a family of her own. The main character is a high-spirited intelligent girl on a mission to find a family that will love and accept her for who she is. The story spreads the wonderful message that if you remaining true to yourself and never compromising who you are.. A great mother-daughter read for little girls of all ages.