Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday

Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday

by Judith Viorst, Ray Cruz

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Overview

Alexander grapples with money management in this beloved picture book from Judith Viorst, author of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.

Last Sunday, Alexander's grandparents gave him a dollar—and he was rich. There were so many things that he could do with all of that money!

He could buy as much gum as he wanted, or even a walkie-talkie, if he saved enough. But somehow the money began to disappear...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780812405767
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/28/1987
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 508,998
Product dimensions: 9.90(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range: 5 - 8 Years

About the Author

Judith Viorst is the author of the beloved Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, which has sold some four million copies; the Lulu books, including Lulu and the Brontosaurus; the New York Times bestseller Necessary Losses; four musicals; and poetry for children and young adults. Her most recent books of poetry include What Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About? and Nearing Ninety.

Ray Cruz is the illustrator of the modern classics Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day and Alexander, Who Used To Be Rich Last Sunday.

Customer Reviews

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Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich, Last Sunday 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
JohnathanJL More than 1 year ago
I like this book, because it tought me not to spend money on things that I don't need.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My kids love all of the Alexander books and this one has the added bonus of teaching about money too. My daughters (now 5 and almost 7) have enjoyed the books for several years. This one not only teaches about how easy it is to squander your money away, but it painlessly teaches coin values, subtraction and more subtle math. Any child with siblings will relate to poor Alexander and his brotherly woes too. A favorite around here!
Greenish More than 1 year ago
This book is excellent for tying the language arts curriculum to mathematics.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a good book, though not as much fun as the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. It was a theme gift so I bought a cute little kids style cash box from Kazoo, some stickers to personalize the box and a roll of quarters inside the cash box and the book to go along.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like it so much, I read it in front of the class. I like the part where he bought unrefundable bottles to Friendly market. The people there aren't so friendly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like this book because i never will spend my money on thinngs i dont need
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey, who saw the Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day movie?! It was cute!
Okie_Jewell More than 1 year ago
This book was purchased to enhance a homeschool math lesson. It was easy to adapt it to also use in our English lesson. We used it over a weeks time and found it interesting and fun to read and analyze it for multiple lessons. I would use this book again due to it's adaptability.
bamabreezin4 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I loved the use of humor in a kid friendly way. Also, I thought the story taught the value of saving money in an interesting and fun way.
Katie20 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a really cute book about a young boy who always ends up having a bad situation. The boy is Alexander. He gets a dollar from his parents and is told to buy crazy things that he does not need, but in the end he realizes that a dollar does go along way. This teaches children that just because their money is gone look positive and see all of the things you got out of the experience.
juliac83 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Summary: This is about a boy who gets a dollar from his grandparents and spends it all in a week. He is determined to save his money but keeps finding more important things. He buys toys, loses money, loses bets and has to pay for bad behavior. It ends with Alexander learning it is important to spend wisely and of course wish for his grandparents to come back to visit.Personal Reaction: I really enjoy this book because we are teaching our daughter the value of money. It was a lot of fun to see how she already knew some of his decisions were bad ones, and how she would have done them differently. Classroom Extension Ideas: This could easily be used to start a lesson on money management. The amounts of money in the book are broken into pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters. This would help with counting and money value. It also would be a great introduction to a cause and effect lesson. It shows his choices and the outcomes to every decision he makes.
amspicer on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Trying to teach your child about the value of money? Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday is the perfect icebreaker to start off that conversation...This is a story about a boy who cannot save his money. Whenever he has money he spends it. Will he ever learn his lesson? This book explains various different things that children could do with their money in a realistic way.
Leshauck on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Kids love getting money. Kids also like to spend their money. Alexander faces these problems in this book
Schuman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite of the Alexander books. Alexander gets a dollar and thinks he's rich. He tells about all the things he's going to do with his money and then what he actually does with it.It is shows how far a dollar really goes.I think it is great for discussioning money.
vnwender on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a funny book about a boy named Alexander who is always comparing what he has to what his brothers have. They have dollars and coins but all he has is bus tokens
jnagreen06 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Just like the first Alexander book, this is a good example of a realistic fiction book, because Alexander is not a real person, and the story didn't actually happen, but it could. Kids may be able to relate with him as they read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago