The Alexander Cipher

The Alexander Cipher

by Will Adams

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Overview

Workers in Alexandria are excavating for a new building when they discover the ruins of an old tomb, and all work crashes to a halt. According to federal law in Egypt, all discoveries must be properly catalogued by archeologists and this tomb has unusual relics and representations, apparently contemporary with Alexander the Great.


Daniel Knox's first love is history and archeology, specifically on Alexander the Great. When he pisses off a local mobster on the coast of Egypt, he heads to Alexandria to an archaeology colleague's apartment to hide out for a while. He learns his friend is getting to participate on the dig for this newly discovered tomb. Sneaking in with his friend, Daniel sees signs that the find is far bigger than anyone realizes and might hold clues to finally unravelling one of the world's greatest mysteries: Where is Alexander the Great buried?


In his lifetime, Alexander was beloved as a god, and across the Mediterranean, everyone wanted to be close to him. Upon his death, there was a mad scrabbling among his former allies to secure his empire for themselves. Even now, nearly 2500 years later, Alexander is still being fought over. With the discovery of this tomb and the revelation of its relics, the race is on to find Alexander. Rival archeologists, Egyptian officials, and Macedonian nationalists all scurry and scramble, attacking each other along the way as they hunt for a glorious prize--the body of Alexander the Great.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780446544375
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Publication date: 03/18/2009
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 77,325
File size: 418 KB

About the Author

William Petre worked as a shop salesman, painter & decorator, warehouse porter and microfiche technician, before joining a Washington DC-based firm of business history consultants. He wrote a series of corporate histories and biographies for them, taking time off between projects to travel in search of exotic settings for his stories. More recently, he worked for a London communications agency, but he now concentrates on writing fiction full-time. He lives in Essex, England.

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Alexander Cipher 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 68 reviews.
James Dammann More than 1 year ago
One of a handful of book that i picked up in paperback @ wal-mart. I wasn't dissapointed. Like one of the other reviews here, i have a fascination for archaeology related stories. Thanks for a good book!
Just_the_facts_Maam More than 1 year ago
I was a little concerned when I first started reading this book that I wouldn't like it--it seemed to start a bit slowly for me, but I am happy I stuck with it. I was soon immersed in the story. The plot moves the action ahead and kept me interested. The characters were well rounded and I cared about them. The setting of the story in Egypt fascinated me, especially the history of Alexander. I actually wanted to visit the area after reading the story. So I highly recommend this book, I almost gave it a "5". I plan on reading more by Will Adams.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you like the mix of mythological/archeological facts with a fictional story, you will love this author and his works. This is fast-paced, multi-faceted yet well-tied together, and simply fascinating. Enjoy!
Noticer More than 1 year ago
Totally enjoyed this book both from historical perspective as well as plot. Gives a good look at how people lived in olden times. Would recommend to anyone interested in archeology.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and am about to read Adams' next one, The Exodus Quest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked the book. It has different subject matter from the usual Judaeo-Christian conspiracy archaeological thrillers, which in itself is refreshing. The characters are, for the most part, more everyday people rather than supermen and women. People get hurt and tired. Things break. Motives are, for the most part, believable. The author's writing style is clear, wry, and enjoyable. It's a great book for a rainy afternoon or two, and would make a decent movie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the genre of historical fiction where the author gives me a history lesson but with a bit of fantasy. I think that Will Adams certainly accomplished that goal. I enjoyed learning more about the conflicts between Macedonians and Greeks. I just felt that the final outcome of the story left me wanting more. It was all wrapped up in a bow too pretty for me. I'm hoping that the ending will lead to further stories with the main character. He was scrappy without being too perfect (a la Cussler's Dirk). I will certainly be looking forward to a sequel if there is one in the future.
Anonymous 3 months ago
entertaining, the ending was anticlimactic
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read.
readingwithtea on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This really is airport trash ¿ I struggled to finish it.We¿re on the hunt for Alexander the Great¿s sarcophagus, which is somewhere in the Middle East. We have corrupt Egyptian politicians, businessman and archaeologists, a painful caricature of an Australian, a reckless British archaeologist who happens to be a deep-sea diver too¿ the characters just don¿t fit together at all.The historical story-telling is competent enough, but it gets lost in the Middle Eastern politics and corruption and the struggle for Macedonian independence. Fine for Singapore airport. Otherwise, give it a miss.
CymLowell on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Will Adams creates a new thriller character destined to be a long-running series of best sellers. Daniel Knox is a knock-around archaeologist in Egypt with a history of interesting relationships with his brethren and sponsors.The supervisor of a construction project in Alexandria stumbles onto a potential site of the final resting place of Alexander the Great, whose body was coveted as a justification for power by his successors in Egypt, the Ptolemys, Alexander¿s native Macedonians.The race begins in the fashion of an Indiana Jones movie. Knox is pursued by a bad guy for saving a young girl from being raped by the tyrant. Along the way, there is a budding love affair with a woman who blamed Knox for the odd death of her archaeologist father, an evil female colleague who seems easily seduced by lovers and sources of money, a little girl desperately in need of a bone marrow transplant, rich Macedonian nationalists intent on using Alexander¿s body as the means, after more than 2,000 years, of fomenting revolution to establish a separate Macedonia out of Greece and Balkan states.The Alexander Cipher beautifully blends the history of Alexander and his successors into an entertaining, rip-roaring, action-packed, page-turning adventure. The past of Daniel also will not remain there, as the female protagonist in the story, Gillie, moves from a hatred attributable to the strange death of her father to something more beautiful.This is an excellent, well-crafted story. It cries out for a sequel in the adventures of Daniel Knox.
Squeex on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Whew! I now want to become an archaeologist and dig in the dirt and learn more about Alexander the Great...There was a lot of backstory that I hope will be covered in the future books of this series. The explanations of Alexander and his demise were interspersed with a whole lot of action and people getting whacked and drugged and kidnapped while searching for the final resting place of Alexander. A good mixture for me to get me back in the thriller mode that I've been neglecting for, lo, these many months. I could compare the style to a Dirk Pitt novel, but Daniel Knox actually feels pain and takes a while to get up from getting beat up. I've never had the feeling that Dirk ever really feels pain, but that's okay. I read the Dirk Pitt books for other reasons, mainly because I picture Matthew McConaghey as I read them thanks to the movie Sahara. Still working on who I cast as Daniel Knox....Four treasure trove beans.....
kimmy0ne on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A good intriguing read
daisygrl09 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Very good. Couldn't put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Riveting
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good reading
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow. I'm embarrassed by how much I disliked this book. The author does a great job of explaining European and Egyptian history but struggles mightily crafting a quality narrative. Most readers don't have an in-depth knowledge of archaeological dig sites but the author doesn't seem to care. Details are murky and it was very hard to picture. The many characters all intertwined in a ludicrous fashion. The lead female is just a damsel in distress and its a shame. Overall, a simply deplorable novel.
Wiliam_Maltese More than 1 year ago
DISAPPOINTING! I really thought I was going to enjoy reading this one. Certainly, it seemed to have a lot going for it, as far as the kind of book I like. A hidden treasure, in this case the long-lost tomb of Alexander the Great. A de rigueur cipher (hey, not a surprise, considering the name of the book); although, the cipher/code ploy is a bit overworked, these days, in this kind of genre. There was Egypt, as a locale, where I‘ve spent some time — Alexandria, Cairo, the oasis at Siwa, the desert (complete with mandatory sand storm). In the end, though, alas, the book disappointed. I found it too much a stretch of credulity to believe two different sites simultaneously provided clues to the whereabouts of Alexander’s tomb. An attempted rape didn’t quite ring true, as it turned a rogue archaeologist into even more of man on the run. There was a fatal car accident that seemed just too reminiscent to a similar one read in another book just recently. And while the usual cast of characters — people with grudges and bones to pick, crooked government officials, corrupt rich men — all did what they usually do, in books like this (cross and double-cross), none of them, or their machinations, really held my interest for long, or kept me glued to the edge of my seat. Nor did I quite buy the all-important plan to use Alexander’s recovered body as a pawn in the struggle for Macedonian independence. Granted, the author had obviously done his research on Alexander and the missing tomb, but I was already familiar with most of those facts; so they weren’t enough to hold my adamant interest to the very end: a shame, in that this novel seemed to have such genuine initial potential. Then, again, keep in mind that any reader less familiar and biased than I, what with my familiarity as regards the encompassing historical circumstances, might find this a genuinely fascinating read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fun adventure!
RedSwallowtail More than 1 year ago
Excellent Book!! I couldn't put it down! I hope that Will Adams writes a third one to make a cool trilogy. This book is face-paced and has a lot of action. Would make a great movie!!!
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