A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment

A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment

by Stéphane Hénaut, Jeni Mitchell

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Overview

A “delicious” (Dorie Greenspan), “genial” (Kirkus Reviews), “very cool book about the intersections of food and history” (Michael Pollan)—as featured in the New York Times

"The complex political, historical, religious and social factors that shaped some of [France's] . . . most iconic dishes and culinary products are explored in a way that will make you rethink every sprinkling of fleur de sel."
—The New York Times Book Review

Acclaimed upon its hardcover publication as a “culinary treat for Francophiles” (Publishers Weekly), A Bite-Sized History of France is a thoroughly original book that explores the facts and legends of the most popular French foods and wines. Traversing the cuisines of France’s most famous cities as well as its underexplored regions, the book is enriched by the “authors’ friendly accessibility that makes these stories so memorable” (The New York Times Book Review). This innovative social history also explores the impact of war and imperialism, the age-old tension between tradition and innovation, and the enduring use of food to prop up social and political identities.

The origins of the most legendary French foods and wines—from Roquefort and cognac to croissants and Calvados, from absinthe and oysters to Camembert and champagne—also reveal the social and political trends that propelled France’s rise upon the world stage. As told by a Franco-American couple (Stéphane is a cheesemonger, Jeni is an academic) this is an “impressive book that intertwines stories of gastronomy, culture, war, and revolution. . . . It’s a roller coaster ride, and when you’re done you’ll wish you could come back for more” (The Christian Science Monitor).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781620972526
Publisher: New Press, The
Publication date: 07/10/2018
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 37,647
File size: 28 MB
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About the Author

Stéphane Hénaut ’s wide-ranging career in food includes working in the Harrods fromagerie , cooking for the Lord Mayor of London’s banquets, and selling obscure vegetables in a French fruiterie. He lives in Berlin.

Jeni Mitchell is a teaching fellow in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. She lives in Berlin.

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A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like the idea of reciting history in the bite-sized concept. Combining history, wine and culinary, "A Bite-Sized History of France" uses an interesting way to retell the history. Overall a great read but there are few dull moments. It's great to read a chapter or two every day. The chapters are short and easy to understand. 3.5 star rating overall.
oldwarden More than 1 year ago
A fantastic way to learn history! Rather than another boring list of dates, people, and events, the authors take a completely different route. Use the deliciously wonderful foods of France to explain history! Why did the Romans consider the Germanic tribes barbarians? One big reason was because they cooked their food with butter, rather than olive oil! They also drank beer instead of wine. How uncouth! Did you know why soldiers called the Germans krauts? Because of their association with sauerkraut! Potatoes, honey, champagne, crepes....it's all in here, and tied to historical events. I only wish that I would have had this book when I was a student. How much more interesting history classes would have been!