7 short stories that INTJ will love

7 short stories that INTJ will love

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Overview

INTJs are highly capable and like to work alone; their mind works rationally and analytically, always one step ahead. In this book you will find seven short stories specially selected to please the tastes of the INTJ. These are stories by renowned authors that will surely bring reflections, insights and fun to people with this kind of personality. This book contains: - The Haunted Mind by Nathaniel Hawthorne. - The Cactus by O. Henry. - Meditations: Book Seven by Marcus Aurelius. - A Scandal in Bohemia by Arthur Conan Doyle. - The Atheist's Mass by Honoré de Balzac. - Bartleby, the Scrivener by Herman Melville. - The Canterville Ghost by Oscar Wilde.For more books that will suit you, be sure to check out our Two Classic Novels your Myers-Briggs Type Will Love collection! *** Cover image: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), one of the greatest composers of all time and INTJ.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9788577774487
Publisher: Tacet Books
Publication date: 09/06/2019
Series: 7 short stories for your Myers-Briggs type , #11
Sold by: Bookwire
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 91
File size: 383 KB
Age Range: 10 Years

About the Author

Nathaniel Hawthorne was an American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer. Much of Hawthorne's writing centers on New England, many works featuring moral metaphors with an anti-Puritan inspiration. His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, dark romanticism.    William Sydney Porter, better known by his pen name O. Henry, was an American short story writer. O. Henry's stories frequently have surprise endings. In his day he was called the American answer to Guy de Maupassant. While both authors wrote plot twist endings, O. Henry's stories were considerably more playful, and are also known for their witty narration. Most of O. Henry's stories are set in his own time, the early 20th century. Many take place in New York City and deal for the most part with ordinary people: policemen, waitresses, etc.   Marcus Aurelius was Roman emperor from 161 to 180 and a Stoic philosopher. He was the last of the rulers traditionally known as the Five Good Emperors, and the last emperor of the Pax Romana, an age of relative peace and stability for the Roman Empire. He served as Roman consul in 140, 145, and 161. The Column and Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius still stand in Rome, where they were erected in celebration of his military victories.   Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was a British writer best known for his detective fiction featuring the character Sherlock Holmes. Originally a physician, in 1887 he published A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels and more than fifty short stories about Holmes and Dr. Watson. The Sherlock Holmes stories are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction.   Honoré de Balzac was a French novelist and playwright. The novel sequence La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of post-Napoleonic French life, is generally viewed as his magnum opus. Owing to his keen observation of detail and unfiltered representation of society, Balzac is regarded as one of the founders of realism in European literature. He is renowned for his multi-faceted characters; even his lesser characters are complex, morally ambiguous and fully human.    Herman Melville was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period. Among his best-known works are Typee (1846), a romantic account of his experiences of Polynesian life, and his masterpiece Moby-Dick (1851). Moby-Dick (1851), although now considered one of the great American novels, was not well received among contemporary critics.  Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, and the circumstances of his criminal conviction for "gross indecency", imprisonment, and early death at age 46.

Date of Birth:

July 4, 1804

Date of Death:

May 19, 1864

Place of Birth:

Salem, Massachusetts

Place of Death:

Plymouth, New Hampshire

Education:

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, 1824

Table of Contents

The Haunted Mind by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The Cactus by O. Henry. Meditations: Book Seven by Marcus Aurelius. A Scandal in Bohemia by Arthur Conan Doyle. The Atheist's Mass by Honoré de Balzac. Bartleby, the Scrivener by Herman Melville. The Canterville Ghost by Oscar Wilde.

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