V. (French Edition)

V. (French Edition)

by Thomas Pynchon

Paperback(French-language Edition)

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V. 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
neanderthal78 More than 1 year ago
Thomas Pynchon is one of those authors that one either loves or hates. No...scratch that. Thomas Pynchon is one of those authors who writes a book that you either love or hate. I've read five of his novels and loved three but found the other two a bit boring. V. is one of the three that I love and I think might still be his best work. When I was just out of high school I picked up Gravity's Rainbow and was real excited about jumping in. But after the first 50 pages I had no idea what was going on or what it was even about. So it went on the shelf. Years later I picked it back up and it was the same story as before. So I decided to read "The Crying of Lot 49" to give him another chance and I loved it. Not only that I started to understand his writing style and his way with words. I went back after finishing "Lot" and read "Gravity's Rainbow" with the companion guide and thought it was the greatest novel ever written. It's just fantastic once you get past the stream of conscious, postmodern style. There is no "A" to "B" to "C"...it's a long twisting road that demands your attention. It's not like a King or Patterson novel where you take it one vacation and read it while sitting on the beach. It stood as my favorite work of his until I read "V." "V." is a masterpiece from start to finish. The first time I read it I fully didn't understand all the twists and turns but just went along for the ride, picking up what I could and leaving the rest for a later read. Well I just finished it again after reading it two years ago and I got a heck of a lot more out of it this time around. The novel is one that I feel people should read before "Gravity's Rainbow". If you can get into "V." then "GR" should be a problem. I love Stencil. He might just be one of my all time favorite characters in any novel. The plot is great...the flashbacks to Egypt, Florence, German South West Africa and Malta are worth the read alone. Some characters in this novel also make appearances in "GR". I will be reading this again at some point in time to pick up more of what is going one. It's a quest...and a fun one at that. Give it a try and let the madness begin. On a side note, I still don't like "Mason & Dixon".
Nick34 More than 1 year ago
Don't be intimidated by V., the beginning of this book is easy to read and you kind of ease into the story rather than jumping right in to such as in Gravity's Rainbow. I read 180 pages of GR, but decided to go back and read V. as well as the Crying of Lot 49 before attempting GR in its entirety. I had no idea what to expect but I was never bored while reading this book. Pynchon's detail and writing is unsurpassed by anyone else I've read. As for the complexity of the text, it is difficult to understand at times, but after some re-reading and finishing a chapter things always come together. I'm 17 and I was able to understand the story, so it shouldn't be a problem for someone of average intelligence to complete. If you feel unsure about it then start with the Crying of Lot 49, a very cool story and by far the easiest and shortest of Pynchon's novels (excluding Slow Learner). I highly recommend this book, Pynchon will change the way you look at literature.
flashgirl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An excellent read for aspiring adventuresses
inaudible on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Can I give this book seven or eight stars? An incredible book by itself, this work is remarkable when one remembers it is Pynchon's first novel.Funny, disturbing, dense, absurd, horrific, casual. There are some sentences and paragraphs that only a dozen writers in the world are capable of matching.Throughout reading I found myself drawing connections to Bolano's 'The Savage Detectives': The Whole Sick Crew vs. The Visceral Realists, V. vs. Cesárea Tinajero, and so on. I wonder if Bolano read Pynchon?
wodehousegirl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading this one, on the recommendation of someone who said that V. was a good way to get into Pynchon. I'm a Pynchon newbie, always heard of him as one of the pioneers of 20th century literature, but I had no idea what to expect when starting this novel. I can honestly say I've never read anything quite like it. It reminded me of a sort of dream, one that appears to fracture and and yet retains its inner structure at all times. Like a dream, it's full of confusion, allegory, symbolism, self-conscious meanderings, and nostalgia. Reading this novel is not a pleasant experience in the normal way. At times it drags and you think it's going nowhere, then it switches over into a grand period mystery that completely captures your imagination, and then it goes into subject matter that is so depressing and grim that I started to squirm in my seat (see the particularly uncomfortable chapters 4, which describes a rhinoplasty in such incredible detail that I felt ill, and 9, in which genocide and torture are discussed in equal detail). It's a difficult read, but it's worth it, if only for the fact that it is so strange and off-kilter that I felt as if my brain was expanding and stretching just to be able to take it all in, which can't be a bad thing, right? I liked it enough to try more Pynchon in the future but, in the meantime, I'll recuperate with some lighter fare!
Ramirez on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I've the deep convinction that this book is completely nonsense. Still, it's beautiful to read...
tyroeternal on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
V was, in all honesty a wonderful book. My joy in postmodern fiction is extremely limited. While I did not absolutely enjoy it, I do recognize that it was well written.Unfortunately much of the book involved me declaring something along the lines of: "Wow, I have no idea what is happening!" My struggling mind was relieved to see the conclusion of the book and the conclusion of the twisting tale. As I have come to understand, all of Pynchon's novels take the same overwhelming approach... I look forward to another book of his is the future.
Gazgnu on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books I've ever read. It's not easy, but it's amazingly rich, beautiful and strangely funny. It's about the relationships between people and objects in this crazy modern world of ours (well, circa 1960). The man is a genius.
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Sometimes a yo-yo is just a yo-yo. My advice - read the free sample then decide if you are willing to pay for more of the same.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
just go for it. you'll have to read it twice, maybe 5, maybe 73 times. no one can expect to understand it in its entirety on the first attempt. it can be a fun and enlightening read if you let it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having read Mason & Dixon, my expectations for V. were, perhaps, unfairly high. Clearly, V. is not Pynchon's best work of metafiction. The story rambles aimlessly, incessantly and pointlessly, at times. Of course, the futility in part is the point. However, the mystery concerning who or what is V. becomes wearisome after 400 pages of time travel punctuated by random global adventures even for a patient reader. The names of the shallow, flat characters are utterly sophomoric -- Stencil, Paola, Benny Profane, Pig, Slab -- they reminded me of the cast from a novel by Nabokov or characters of Beckett, except that Beckett always pulls them off and they're rounder, human figures about whom we actually care. The antics and low humor from the bars of Norfolk to the sewers of New York to wartime Malta seemed, sorry about this, somewhat silly and slapstick. But one has to remember that this is Pynchon's first novel and one can see the writer begin to mature as his first novel progresses. One begins to see the hint of the mature writer emerge in the chapter about V. in Love. And although the epilogue is epic, leaving one to wonder if he couldn't conclude how to conclude, the writing becomes scintillating. M&D is a masterpiece. It was enough to take me to V., which disappointed, onto Gravity's Rainbow, nevertheless, which is utterly blowing my mind. The point is that although V. seems sophomoric, Pynchon was, in fact, a sophomore when he wrote it and only a few years out of Cornell at that. Perhaps, the Iliads of V. and M&D could only have been written by a man from Ithaca. You may want to save V. for last and go straight to M&D or Gravity's Rainbow. Of course, if you happen to be a sophomore, you may find that V. is your cup of tea. Whatever you decide to do, I hope you decide to read Pynchon. He's the real thing and stands among the few living legends left in America of quite possibly Nobel stature. I could take or leave V. But M&D and Gravity's Rainbow are to die for.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book mainly out of curiosity. I was expecting a tough read, but i thought I would be well prepared for it. The book was entriguing at first, with great stories from this guy's life and his friends, but then i started to become overwhelmed with the amount of characters and trying to pick out the underlying theme of this novel. I was aware before buying it that it was a multifacted allegory, but became overwhelmed with all the information to remember around page 75 in some foreign country--and it was also uninteresting. Im sure i will finish at a later time, but im writing this to tell others it might be a better book to rent from your local library. (If you remember to renew it)
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a book that you have to work at reading, but the work brings great rewards. The first thing I did after I read the last page was to begin reading it again. This book is full of secrets and becomes very addictive, that is, once you make it through your first hundred pages.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'A sincerly interesting book, once one has gotten past the first part of the book. To tell any more about the book would be to ruin the entire story. The only thing that I can say is that if you enjoy the wonderful yarns of Eco, and the narrator voice in Kerouac's books...then you will surely enjoy this book...just give it time.'