The Voyage Out (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

The Voyage Out (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Paperback(Barnes & Noble Edition)

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The Voyage Out 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 122 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Voyage Out' is a very interesting story about the education and growth of a 24 year old girl in the 20th Century. I highly recommended reading it in Barnes & Nobles edition specially to students like me who are beginning the American Classics because it contains very helpful explanations of historical facts or expressions of that time. It includes also a detailed biography of the author and an introductory explanation of the book's context which was great because I was unfamiliar with Virginia Wolf's life or work. Only with this help I could fully understand this extraordinary book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was fantastic! I love to read classic novels and this one not only drew me in immediately, but kept me hooked. V.W has a literary style that is unsurpassed by other women of her time, with an ebb and flow that most women fail to possess. It is an accurate portrayl of a woman that is secluded from the rest of society and has a lack of basic social knowledge. Though I didn't agree with the aspects of feminism, I must say that all men would benifit from reading this, as it lends a window into the mind of women. If this don't make you stop and think of your life and mentality every ten pages, then nothing will.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'd wanted to read her novels for years, but wasn't sure I was up for them. This is a great first read, her first novel, in beginner's style, before she got too far out there. The prose is great.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was the first Barnes and Noble classic I read, and the story instantly drew me in. I had recently seen 'The Hours' and wondered if Virginia Woolf wrote similarly to the way she was in real life. I was completely wrong. This story is entertaining and refreshing just like a voyage out!!!
Anonymous 8 days ago
Not many reviews here!!! Just a bunch of kids talking about a bunch of nothing!!!!!!!
rcooper3589 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Well, I tried to finish this book but I just couldn't do it. I couldn't stand it any longer. It's horrid. I found the book so slow and so boring. It doesn't help that I'm not a big fan of drama/love stories about English society in the early 1900's either. I didn't care about any of the characters- they were all whinny brats on vacation. I did, however, appreciate Woolf's forward thinking in regards to women in politics and education. That was nice. That, however, was the only nice thing. After over 200 pages I just couldn't read the next 200. No way. I really tried. Really, I did. Oh well... hopefully the next book is good.
GarySeverance on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rachel Vinrace is a character whose life in England is structured by Victorian ideas of the proper development of young women. Her outer life is restricted by her maiden aunts, and her inner life is kept in check by self-discipline in her piano playing and the restraint imposed on her imagination in the kind of literature she is allowed to read. Rachel has an opportunity to take a voyage out of her bonds on a cruise to South America. She begins to loosen her self restrictions as she studies the artificial and real motives of her fellow travelers. While on her father's ship, Rachel's liberation is as slow and determined as her piano playing, staying with the composition but engaging in a few private improvisations. While staying at a hotel in South America, the pace of Rachel's development accelerates. As she accompanies other brave souls on a short guided trip into the wilds of the jungle, Rachel's insight races. But she has no meaningful starting point or signposts to guide her in self exploration. Her emotions become increasingly intense and her behavior more erratic as she falls in love with a fellow passenger. Rachel's ideas take flight with striking visual images and loose emotional associations. A common resolution of her out of control improvisations is the complete peace of immersion in an undersea world, a final reduction of "fever." Virginia Woolf's first novel is an excellent self portrait of budding bipolar disorder. The author sketches this portrait by producing unexpected and "pretty notes" as Louis Armstrong described his jazz. Woolf ultimately found her own underwater peace suggesting the tremendous toll of manic creativity.
DieFledermaus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was the first novel of Woolf, which can be seen in the more conventional storyline. It's a coming of age story of Rachel Vinrace, an unformed and cloistered girl. In the opening scenes, she meets her aunt and uncle with whom she's had little contact. Helen has a vibrant and gregarious personality while her husband is a bookish scholar who almost disappears from the novel. Rachel goes through the standard life-changing events - a new companion in Helen, the journey away from home, and love. After arriving in South America, Helen and Rachel fall into a group of other Brits. As in some of her later books - To the Lighthouse, Between the Acts, even The Waves - Woolf follows the thoughts of the whole group. Especially interesting was Susan Warrington, an unmarried girl getting up in age. She's there to help her elderly aunt who thinks of her as almost a servant. Susan dreads a life of insignificance, never free to do what she wants, always part of someone else. Unexceptional and awkward, she doesn't have good prospects for marriage. However, Arthur Venning takes an interest in her and they wind up engaged. Certainly they'll only end up as a middling couple - noted by St John Hirst and Terence Hewet - but it's really the best she can hope for. Hewet and Rachel pair off while Hirst and Helen start spending more time together. Hewet is sensitive, sometimes sentimental, a contrast to his wry, witty friend Hirst but Rachel has almost no personality at all. Her one characteristic is that she is an expert piano player. Under Helen and Hewet, she not so much as develops a personality but has them rub off a bit on her. A trip up the river is her last, as she falls ill. Ironically, after 20 odd years of not doing much, she dies when she'd finally started interacting with the outer world. The book was odd in that the heroine could not at all be said to have a strong or even well-defined personality so much prefer Woolf's later, more experimental fiction and would recommend those.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm sorry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Nya~" ((TOKYO GHOUL SEASON TWO IS RELEASED TOMORROW AND I AM SERIOUSLY NOT EMOTIONALLY PREPARED HELP))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in lookin around at all the people
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in shyly
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sat quietly, drinking another beer
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A tiger with a diamond bracelet on pads in. "Finally! Time to paartay!", she says.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A pretty blond haired girl with a double peirced, small gold hoop earing on her left ear walked in. Her hair was up in a braid with a gold ring holding ot together to one side, while her side bangs hung in front of her right eye. Her bright green eyes watched everyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
[Sorry wrong person]<p>"Give. Me. The. Cat. Now." She growled at Kiriel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She walked in, earbuds shoved into her ears and her dark hair pulle into a messy ponytail. She wore a white off the shoulder t-shirt with the words, 'Save Rock and Roll' scrawled across in blocky gold lettering and skinny jeans, plus Roots Canada roll down boots and her purple Roots Canads socks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She padded in and looked around.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She smiled quickly, and thanked her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Then I'm leaving, too. I hate these things!"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in and looks atound
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wolf went to her son sniffing him then leaving to hunt
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you wanna fu<_>ck go to bbb res one. (;