Sandworms of Dune

Sandworms of Dune

by Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson

NOOK BookFirst Edition (eBook - First Edition)

$7.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Sandworms of Dune (Dune 7 Series #2) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 71 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Sandworms Brian and Kevin finally succeeded in destroying a man¿s greatest legacy to Science Fiction Literature. One of the main things I always enjoyed about Frank Herbert¿s novels, was the ability of formation of the mind as a separate entity capable of many things, the evolution of mind over matter, without the reliance of other things. Of course one of Herbert¿s main points as well as dilemmas was the trade off of reliance on one thing 'machines' to another 'the spice', in essence the trade off of one addiction for another without getting to the root of the problem. Now while I do believe after finally finishing the last in the Dune Series of novels that indeed an outline did exist for future work, I do also believe that the authors took many liberties with this book including in pulling a lot of it out of thin air. The reason I believe this is the revelation of Duncan Idaho, I have always questioned why he was always a constant in all of the six original novels, that there was something indeed special about him, something more than him than just have fanatical loyalty and devotion to all Atreides he served. Also the question of perhaps machines possibly returning did cross my mind with not only Leto¿s withholding of the spice, but also he himself destroy any Mentat¿s he knew about or of in fact he destroyed many Idaho¿s for this very reason of the Bene Thilex creating gholas with mentant powers. There was a reason for this one that was never answered in the original novels. Also, the face dancers as well they had become so good that even the Bene Gesserit couldn¿t really detect them any longer, why because they had evolved as well had become more human to the point they believed they were indeed the person they were to impersonate. However, this is where the ¿outline¿ of Herbert¿s greatest work ends and the tragedy begins. First off the Atreides were special individuals with abilities once combined with the Harkonnen¿s that made them what they were, to take away from the greatness of Paul who could see what others could not see and his son the God Emperor who could see all but said nothing and accepted the sacrifice oh behalf of humanity, belittles this man¿s work. The true objective of the original novels was to teach the consequences on the reliance on any substance be it organic or synthetic and that in trading one for another they had truly learned nothing even 15,000 years later. To bring back fairytale endings of all the original characters being brought back to life, Paul, Alia, Jessica, Leto I, Leto II, Liet-Kynes, Dr. Yueh, and Stilgar is bringing a Hollywood story where the good guys win in the end which isn¿t the purpose of the books at all. As for Duncan being the true Kwistaz Hadarach in any of the novels he never displayed any supernatural powers at all with the exception of his fanatical loyalty and the importance of his genes that not even the Bene Gesserit seemed with all of the prescience seemed to grasp. It was not only disappointing for them to have brought back Erasmus and Ominus but to have Erasmus turn into something not only human but understanding and then merging with Duncan Idaho to give to him the power of the Kwistaz Haderach the one who could be many places at once because he was now a machine with a HUMAN MIND. You can only fill so much into a shot glass before something spills out and this was a flood of too many characters, too many inconsistencies and too much of a disappointment of fans who loved, lived and shared these novels with others. If you don¿t want to get angry read this novel if you must with a grain of salt or try to look at it as a car wreck that you don¿t want to look at but can¿t help staring at as you drive by ¿
LisaJYarde More than 1 year ago
Reading this book was like coming home to a friend I didn't even know I'd missed. I fell under the spell of the six original Dune books as a teenager, read two of the prequel books in adulthood. For anyone familiar with the Dune universe, there is a very familiar feel to this book, with integral characters. Yet, several things are different enough to hold a reader's interest. I kept reminding myself to pace, to go to sleep, so I could savor the next chapter, but it was hard to do.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an avid Dune reader from the Frank Herbert days, I looked forward to the 'conclusion' of the saga. These last 2 books are supposedly based on the master's notes, found long after his death. While I can stretch my imagination to believe that Frank Herbert conceived of this basic storyline, I found the books themselves to be predictable and shallow. The earlier attempts at bringing life to the Dune world were quite good - but they were investigating the past. In looking forward along the original Dune timeline, the authors have failed to live up to the incredible tale that is the original series. Where God Emperor, Chapterhouse and Heretics succeeded in painting a grand universe filled with an infinite variety of mystery and color, these 2 final books shrink it down to something simple and mundane.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read every one of the Dune books several time since the early 80's and while this isn't Franks writing of Dune,it's his sons....and I loved it...couldnt put it down.Normally takes me 3 weeks for a hardcover...took 5 days.Honestly it's the end many people thought it would be...before Brian ever started writing Dune books. If you want 'old school' sci-fi go else where.If your tastes have matured with the years you'll enjoy it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
it+brought+it+all+together+in+what+is+as+good+an+ending+as+one+would+suspect.++Frank+would+be+proud
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book!
FicusFan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the second 'final book' (# 7B) in the original Dune series. I would probably not have picked it up, but my RL book group picked the first 'final book' (#7A) Hunters of Dune . I am a completist and I just couldn't read only half the ending. I was also surprised that I didn't hate book 1, and that their writing had improved. Still not in Frank's league, but better.Supposedly Frank left the outline and these jokers 'filled it in'.This book still has the No-Ship and its inhabitants fleeing from the invisible great Enemy that the Honored Matres lead back to the old empire when they came running back from the scattering. On the ship are Duncan Idaho and the last group of conservative Bene Gesserits, a group of Jews (?) and the last Tleilaxu master, Scytale. He has a capsule of cells and from them they make Gholas. They start resurrecting many of the old characters from 1000s of years ago (first books). That intrigued me, because I am a sucker for the original characters.Unfortunately, they do nothing with the characters for hundreds of pages. They pop in an out of different places and planets, having adventures, but nothing to advance the story. Most of the book was a slog (another 500+ pager) and it took me 12 days to read it. I just couldn't pick it up a lot of the time.The book did pick up starting around page 300. They started to deal with the battle at the end of time with the Enemy. I liked how they wrapped it up. I was happy for the good things that happened to the characters, and sad for the bad things.
DrShitan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Not as bad as I tought it was gonna be, but not nearly as good and well written as Frank Herbert's novels.The plot seems a bit exagerated. In various moments it feels like they're trying to reach the same level of depth and complexity than the original novels, but overall it's not well balanced.But in the end, i think that the story flows quite well and it did kept me wanting to know what was gonna happen next. It's also good to revisit this universe and it's charachters,...more Not as bad as I tought it was gonna be, but not nearly as good and well written as Frank Herbert's novels.The plot seems a bit exagerated. In various moments it feels like they're trying to reach the same level of depth and complexity than the original novels, but overall it's not well balanced.But in the end, i think that the story flows quite well and it did kept me wanting to know what was gonna happen next. It's also good to revisit this universe and it's charachters, altough not in their best form.
Ed_Gosney on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Though many people seem to slam the Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson Dune books, I know that I'm always in for some good adventure and familiar territory when I pick up one to read. Now that I'm through with everything they've written on Dune, I look forward to more Dune adventures.
MSWallack on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I was actually very worried -- even hesitant -- before reading Sandworms of Dune. Ever since reading it for the first time in the late 70s, Dune has been my favorite book. I've read it at least 10 times. I've also read all of the rest of Frank Herbert's Dune books and all of Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's Dune prequels. Some of the books I've enjoyed; others have been almost painful. I didn't like Chapterhouse: Dune, Herbert's last Dune novel before his death. Yet the virtual cliffhanger ending left me wanting more anyway. The first of the "final" sequels, Hunters of Dune suffered from many of the same problems as Chapterhouse: Dune, not the least of which being that it was far to "talky" without enough action. Thankfully -- and finally -- Sandworms of Dune finally reached a better balance. I was also concerned that the direction of the plot device begun in Hunters of Dune -- namely, the introduction of old, familiar characters, as gholas, was a cheap, sentimental plot device. Thankfully, the authors did not descend into self-parody or pastiche and remained true to the Dune universe. In the end, Sandworms of Dune was certainly not a perfect book, but it was much, much better than I'd expected which, given my trepidation, left me feeling very pleased. Supposedly, the story is based on notes left by Frank Herbert; perhaps it was and perhaps not (as many have suggested due to the way in which plot elements coincide with plot elements from the various prequels about the Butlerian Jihad). In any event, for the most part, the plot worked. And, as reluctant as I always am to provide any spoilers, allow me to say that the last chapter (an epilogue much like the epilogue at the end of the final Harry Potter book) provided a moment that almost every fan of Dune has longed for, probably from the moment that they put down Dune Messiah. I know that when I finally put down Sandworms of Dune, I did so with a smile on my face.
derek.collins on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As a finale of the the Dune series this is a great book. But, as I read it, I couldn't help but wonder how the material, the plot, and the characters would have been under the expert hand of Frank Herbert instead of Brian and Kevin. There are several places where plots and counterplots were simply explained for the reader. What made Frank's Dune so strong was that the intrigue was weaved together and slowly revealed. I suppose it is a difference of styles and "understanding" of the material.
Cecrow on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm allowing this four stars for consistency, since as a novel it's no worse than "Hunters", but as the conclusion to the Dune series it was disappointing. I fully anticipated the culmination of Leto II's Golden Path, completing an arc that would have begun with the first three books leading up to his becoming God Emperor, and then three more (Hunters & Sandworms were intended to be one) revealing how the plan he sets in motion pans out, Volume Four ("God Emperor") placed as the keystone. Instead Leto II has no significant role, and the Golden Path gets belittled. The ending as written is okay, but it doesn't unify the whole; it serves, but there's no aftertaste. Ultimately it's no more satisfying a conclusion than the Chapterhouse cliffhanger we were previously left with. I can't help wondering if Brian and Kevin missed a crucial line or two somewhere in Frank Herbert's outline.
drewfull on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you're a huge Dune fan it's worth reading for the four-five plot points that clearly came from Frank Herbert's notes. Otherwise, Brian unfortunately doesn't add much aside from the "look i've brought all the characters back around" nostalgia.If this is your introduction to the this series, go read Dune 1 instead.
mi-chan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The magnificent climax of the Dune cycle is somewhat the miraculous knot solver this twisted story desperately needed. In the previous novel `The Hunters of Dune¿, Sheena and her band of rebellious Bene Gesserits and the refugee Jews stole a no-ship and run from Chapterhouse in order to escape the merging of the Bene Gesserit and the hated Honored Madres. For almost a quarter of a century on the run, the no-ship and its mixed crew encountered several obstacles, like the anonymous enemy for whom apparently the new and almost undetectable Face Dancers were working. With the crew is one of the maybe last Tleilaxu masters, Scytale, who is forced to present his only bargain chip in this game: a nullentropy capsule which contains genetic material of all the great figures of history, which are subsequently resurrected one after another. Sheena hopes that they might bring about the turn in this battle, no one relly understands.Knot solver may be a little overstated, since a few plot twists are not solved so obvious. Only now, when I thought about what to write in this review I stumbled across on thing I did not get throughout the entire book, why, on earth, were two particular ghola babies killed? The no-ship had an saboteur on board, who for no apparent reason killed of two unborn ghola babies including the axlotl tanks that were carrying them. Now, to give some hints: what do they have in common? What makes them different from the other gholas? And what is their relation with the enemy?This dilemma may indicate the special appeal of this particular novel: the reader has to think for him- or herself. Not everything is as it may seem. Only the unknown incarnation of the great Duncan Idaho gets a little annoying after a while. Close to the end, it seems like his entire personality is changing in an instant, as is Erasmus¿.The novel as such is a neat performance and though it requires the reader to use his or her head for more than just store the just read information but also to rearrange it in such a manner that is makes sense, it is still entertaining enough and not only `work¿.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great end to Dune. I recommend this to readers .
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All elements of the story were neatly wrapped up into a nicely optimistic conclusion. Each group and individual was given a purpose and the potential for a meaningful future. Some elements might be cliched, but so what? The end result was a powerful vision of positive future potential in peace and harmony.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago