The Little House Collection Color Box Set

The Little House Collection Color Box Set

Paperback(BOXED)

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Little House Collection Color Box Set 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Delightful series. Enjoyed it as a child, loved reading it to my daughter and now looking forward to reading it to my granddaughter.
rainbowdarling on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The 'Little House' series is a charming series of novels depicting more-or-less the factual journey of the Ingalls family from the 'Big Woods' of Wisconsin to the praries in Dakota. The stories are sweet and unaffected with slight, subtle humor intermixed. Wilder's retelling of her own life story as well as she can remember it is written in a style that feels very juvenile. As such, one gets the idea that the stories were perhaps written to appeal to children, but in their simplicity, both children and adults can enjoy the accounts of the westward travelers. From the first chapter of Little House in the Big Woods, Wilder is frank about certain dangers that the family faced, while showing that despite the difficulty of life on the frontier, people still went about their lives and found things to enjoy. Since Laura herself was so young in the telling of this story, the events shown are limited, but the stories are quaint and sweet and highlight the simplicity of the time in the post-civil war days.Little House on the Prairie continues the story, telling what life was like when the family moved into 'Indian Country' in Kansas. It is interesting to read the story and read how they perceived the natives at the time, what their interactions were like and how they remembered the events. What was normal for that time would now probably end up in court for a case of discrimination. It also provides an interesting picture of what a mess it really was for those traveling west to try to find a homested and settle in on a claim. Without the proper paperwork, a family could end up having to uproot and move along. Sometimes it happened even with the proper paperwork. The Ingalls had to move along from there quickly and their leaving concludes the second book of the series. The style continues in a very simple fashion from the first book, possibly still because Wilder is writing the story of her young childhood which may affect how she herself perceived the time.The next story in the series is an interesting departure. Instead of telling the next chapter of Laura's life, it tells a bit of Almanzo's. The Wilder family is different than the Ingalls family somewhat. The family at this point of the story is still in New York State and that provides a different picture of life than that of life on the prairie frontier. It gives us a little idea of who this Almanzo Wilder is, too, before he reappears later in the story. Of all the stories, I enjoyed this one, but it was my least favorite because of its departure from the story of Laura's family. It feels like an interjection rather than being a part of a chronological telling of the story. All the same, the characters in it are interesting and I felt like I was actually there thanks to the descriptions within. It's a good story that just doesn't seem like a true part of the book series.On the Banks of Plum Creek is possibly one of the more interesting tales of the family's journeys. The live in a dugout, deal with blizzards and wild animals, but also have neighbors and a town close enough to visit when the weather isn't too bad. The cast of characters changes slightly because of the nearby town and suddenly life seems to be more than just about the Ingalls family. I liked the storytelling, too. Laura doesn't claim that she was a model child, or even that her sister Mary, though better behaved, was a model child. The two squabble, they struggle with tempers, jealousy, greed, temptation... normal human afflictions. I felt like I was a part of the lives of the people in the story, so alive they came off of the page. At the beginning of the fifth book in the series, the family is moving yet again. Mary is blinded thanks to a bad bout with scarlet fever, so the lives of the Ingalls family are changed forever. They take their first train ride, the girls meet the first rough men in their memories and the family finally finds a place to settle down for good. It is a well-told story, but the events that hap
Wanderlust_Lost on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Stories for children of 7 or 8 the Little House series is an easy read and their sweet, innocent, but still sometimes serious themes are a good start for kids before they launch into properly serious kids books.I love this series and they were among my favourites as a little girl. What girl doesn't love Little House?I'd recommend these to children everywhere.
jglovesbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Laura and her family's journey is catalogued in this wonderful series. There are even cute black and white illustrations, which I enjoyed when my mom read me Little House in the Big Woods when I was five. I was able to read the rest of the series on my own, and I still enjoyed every page.
elaine58 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of my all-time favorite series, I was actually not interested in these as a child; however, I came to appreciate them as I read the entire series to my own children.
hoosgracie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the few sets of books that I have read multiple times. The Little House books are some of the first that actually interested me. I can still remember reading them in the car when we went to visit Desmet, SD when I was around 8 or 9.
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I found that the books were not in the condition that I personally wanted. I had some smudges in the books when I took them out of the delivery box. I was not impressed with the quality of the books. Other than that, the company's delivery service has left me satisfied. I had ordered some other books at another store in my own country. Those books took longer to arrive than my Barnes & Noble books which were from overseas! So, overall, the only downside for me in buying my collection from Barnes & Noble is the smudges in my books. I like my books to be in perfect condition because I spent a great deal of money on them. Thankyou Barnes & Noble for providing me with much happiness in reading the books though. The words in the books are still the same to me as I had read it as a young child at school. I've always loved the books and have enjoyed learning more about what life was like in the 19th century. Following the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder through these books has still left me staying up late at night reading her adventures. She is a wonderful woman with a wonderful life story. The best thing about reading this series is that I know the details are precise and are real. Every adventure in the book are real. I know this because the author is the girl in the book! It is definitely a joy to read her books. The actual collection is a real collector's edition as it has fine paper with coloured pictures to aid in understanding the story. The large words is wonderful for youngsters to read as it is easier with larger sized words. I definitely recommend this series for girls aged 8-12 who love to read and learn about life in the olden days and of other girls. Boys can read this series too but may not enjoy it as much as girls because the book is from a girl's point of view.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I had the set as a child and loved them they were my favorite books growing up. I probably read every single one at least three times. I would highly recommend these books as the teach morals as well as history.