Flying Too High (Phryne Fisher Series #2)

Flying Too High (Phryne Fisher Series #2)

by Kerry Greenwood

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Flying Too High (Phryne Fisher Series #2) 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very fast read and gives interesting information about Austrialia and the era of the 1920's there. As and American I have been fascinated by Austrialia for many years and have been delighted to find these fast moving interesting books. Kerry Greenwood gives great descriptions of the areas the books take place, clothes and really sets the stage well, but seldom allows the reader to know all of the clues Phryne has found. She keeps your interest all the way to the end of the book. I am hoping I can so I can read the entire collection, I plan to check out any of her other books that reach my hands. Kerry Greenwood has a website for Phryne Fisher that gives a Aussie glossary and a list of charcters and where they come into the series, as well as other interesting items to enjoy.
felixcanis More than 1 year ago
Initially I was drawn in by seeing the Australian TV series, but after I read the first Phryne Fisher mystery I became hooked. Greenwood has created a heroine who has style and smarts, and yet never forgets her origins. There's always a bit of a mystery to Phryne herself and she's always full of surprises. All of the Phryne Fisher mysteries are immensely stylish and clever, and they provide a look at a certain time and place in Australia that is unfamiliar to many readers. This starts out as an investigation of the murder a fairly odious husband and father, but quickly takes a turn into solving a kidnapping. Greenwood takes these two storylines, explores them and draws them together adeptly. Like the wing-walking Phryne pulls off in the story, Greenwood keeps the reader's interest up from beginning to end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fast paced and interesting storyline. Love the descriptions of clothes and customs of the times. They bring back visions of pictures of my grandmother and her friends from the 20s
meSF More than 1 year ago
love it very readable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Australia and the 1920's. Completely different setting and what a lead character
Anonymous 10 months ago
Awesome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Phryne never disappoints!
lahochstetler on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In the previous Phryne Fisher book there were several references to Phryne being a pilot, but aviation played no role. The pilot references seemed like an add-on, so I'm pleased that in this volume we get to see Phryne in action: flying and wing-walking. Phryne is commissioned to find the murderer of a Melbourne tycoon. At the same time, she is also called to investigate a kidnapping. As background to these two mysteries we get to see Phryne furnish her house and attend society functions, as she lives the glamorous life in 1920s Melbourne. Phryne is very much the "New Woman" of the 1920s- short hair, fashionable clothes, sexually liberated. I like the approach of having two mysteries in the book, and as in the previous volume, 1920s Australia provides a fascinating setting. This was a quick and entertaining read, and I'll be reading more in the series.
Smiler69 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In the second book of the Phryne Fisher series, our unflappable flapper (sorry, couldn't resist the pun, won't do it again!) shows off her flying skills, which include walking from wing to wing in the air, solves the mystery of the murder of a despised and cruel man which the police believe to have been committed by the son (though Phryne thinks otherwise) and rescues a six-year-old little girl from the clutches of a gang of criminals, all with great class, style and a solid sense of fair play, and she doesn't hesitate to get her hands dirty to get the job done. Phryne also makes a move to domesticity, leaving behind hotel living to take possession of her newly purchased house with hopes that the recently hired help won't decide to up and leave her, as they realize just how modern she is, when comes the time to invite the first in what promises to be a long line of beautiful young men to spend the night. Much like the first book, hanging out with Phryne Fisher feels like a bit of time-travel back to the roaring 20s for a fun night out on the town with the gals, minus the hangover.
richardderus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Any series needs its "jokes" or established tics and tropes that let dedicated series readers build a sense of friendly familiarity with a character, a place, a group gestalt. This series promises to do that with a vengeance. Phryne's tics and crotchets are consistent...wit, sexual freedom, social conscience unexpected in a rich girl...and the recurring characters around her are given their own lovable ways to a greater extent than is necessarily good for the plot of the series.But no matter. Cec and Bert and Dot are companions one simply can't ignore, and some new additions to the cast bid fair to capsize our already laden Ship of State; still, I can see them all becoming like the cousins one sees at reunions, wakes, and funerals, and wonders idly but fondly about in between.The mysteries in this installment of Phryne's Australian adventure are not particularly well-crafted, and if all one is looking for is a mystery to solve, stop reading at once and go pick up one of Ben Rehder's Blanco County books; he's equally gifted at creating laugh-out-loud funny characters and situations but far more able to make them operate in believeable ways.The central conceit of this book is Phryne flying a plane. Or so one would imagine from the title. No, Phryne is shown flying once, and thereafter others do the flying. It is simply annoying that the flying parts require, in the author's opinion, Phryne's personal involvement; the flying scene could have been eliminated and that thread of the mystery would not have suffered a bit. It could become annoying that Phryne Does It All if this unnecessary character-building goes on in future books.Some very lovable minor characters appear here, at least one of whom I am certain we will see again; of the two love interests in this book, I predict one will be back; and I am hopeful that these probable additions to the cast will require Greenwood to BEEF THESE BOOKS UP to address some of her so-far trademark laconic background building.So...recommended...for the reader who enjoys characters and settings that vary from the ordinary. Pure mysterians, walk on by...nothing to see here....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fun,light read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fun Read full of adventure and mystery with a good twist at the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
#4 in a good old fashion...Miss Fisher is a first rate detective with a heart.
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knitladyJF More than 1 year ago
I have been enjoying reading his books. Phryne Fisher is a good directive who keeps you involved in her life and her friend's lives. I love that the year is in the 1917 to 1925. You can some of the hardship that others went through to live in that time in the world.
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