8 1 / 2

8 1 / 2

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

8 1/2 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
RaphaelM More than 1 year ago
Ordered, paid and didn't received, not even a refund...dissapointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 8 1/2, Fellini had created an abstract composition --a making of a film within a film. Mercello (Fellini's alter-ego) is commissioned to make a film; altho (like in Woody Allen's Stardust Memories) he wants the film to have ''meaning.'' He doesn't want his pics to cater to general moviegoers, an interesting foreshadow of the US movie industry today --altho Fellini didn't specifically intend this. A nice yet overlong climax where Fellini represents life as a circus. Altho an amusing film,it is extremely difficult to watch Fellini's masterwork. It took me several viewings to enjoy (& understand ) this film. But like many great cinematic works, several viewings are necessary. Therefore, we can distingush from what we call a film to a movie; respectively, education from entertainment. Not to say that 8 1/2 was simply pedagogic. A lot of humorous anecdotes make there way in this picture. But movie people would feel awkward watching a film like 8 1/2. Unless, you are a ''cinema'' buff. . . give it a try.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
vmwrites More than 1 year ago
I've become a bigger fan of Federico Fellini, but not because of this film. While the film drones on for what seems like forever, the audience follows the trials and tribulations of the director/producer of a proposed film. That is, the movie is a film about film . . . confused? Well, add to this Fellini's penchant for symbolism, and you end up with an almost Bergmanesque montage that just won't go away. I've loved film for years, but one of the greatest attributes of a film is its evanescence. A good movie should appear, present its story/philosophy/plot, then get out of the way. Like a lengthy infomercial, 8-1/2 seems to go on and on and on, while the audience is subjected to Fellini's dream sequences, fantasy characters, and a psychoanalysis of Mastroianni's character. For cinemaphiles who have been this route before, suffice it to say that I would rather sit through Bergman's "Scenes from a Marriage" three times, than try to endure 8-1/2 again . . .