Dreamland

Dreamland

by Kevin Baker

Paperback

$15.85 $16.99 Save 7% Current price is $15.85, Original price is $16.99. You Save 7%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Friday, November 15

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Dreamland 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While many professional reviewers site the book close to Doctrow I saw a combination of Doctrow for the subject format, and a tip to John Jakes, particularly his 'California Gold.' I enjoyed Baker's jab's at Riis's 'Romantic' photo's and the scene of the The 'New' Police Headquarters is timeless. New Yorkers should read this book before the city 're-opens' its renovated Tammy Hall Courthouse.
Feltrer More than 1 year ago
The narrative style of Kevin Baker and the interest of the story make Dreamland a novel that you enjoy from the start. The characters are surprising and endearing at once. Read from Barcelona, Spain, as in my case, reveals many similarities between the lifestyle of the poor immigrants in New York and Barcelona at the beginning of last century. The chapter in which Esther begins her first job, for example, could have gone to Barcelona in the same way, and Lower East Side district would be the "Poble Nou" here. Dreamland only lacks two things: to be translated into Spanish and be made into a film. The novel has qualities for in both cases, become a success, no doubt!
deargreenplace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I finished reading this book just as the tv programme Boardwalk Empire aired in the UK. The book tells the tales of a colourful variety of characters in the post-depression era, all connected by Dreamland amusement park at Coney Island. There is a politician, a gangster, a female immigrant and Trick the Dwarf, a performer at the amusements.For me the book belonged to Esse, daughter of Eastern European immigrants and an underpaid seamstress in The Triangle - a hazardous factory. She takes trips to Coney Island every Sunday to escape her homelife, and one week meets a handsome stranger. She doesn't yet know about his connections, nor he hers.The historical research that's gone into the book is very evident, and that alone would make me recommend it to others. Strange to be reminded of a time when food and material possessions were hard fought for. I haven't yet watched Boardwalk Empire, but I hope it's every bit as good as Dreamland.
PghDragonMan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Set in New York City of the early Twentieth Century, Baker's novel draws on the actual immigrant history of the time and strips off the romantic veneer to show us the ugly truth of the times. People were routinely exploited, politics was corrupt, the police were corrupt and the American Dollar was king. Set in the middle of all this, Baker gives us some incredibly complex characters, some modeled after real life people of the times, and follows them through their daily lives.Not a kind picture of our American roots, but still an important glimpse in to the past nonetheless. Suggested for those with a taste for off beat (but real life) characters, a taste for historical fiction or an interest in one of the great industrial tragedies of the early Twentieth Century.
SeriousGrace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It makes sense that a historian like Kevin Baker would write something as epic and sweeping as Dreamland. It is a beautifully blended tale of fiction and reality. Events like the Triangle Shirtwaist fire and people like Sigmund Freud and politics like Tammany Hall exist in harmony with fictional Coney Island gangsters and seedy carnival performers. It's a world of underground rat fights, prostitution, gambling, and the sheer violent will to survive. It's dirty and tragic. A love story hidden behind the grime, the colorful lights, the tricks, and the chaotic noise of New York.
fauxbro on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Beautifully written historical novel that reall gives a sense of New York in the early 20th. Unfortunately the climax is a bit of a let down. Still, well worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book never really comes together. It is a disturbing book, but that would not have mattered if the transitions could have been smoother.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kool
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sighns the papers silently and leaves