Death Traps: The Survival of an American Armored Division in World War II

Death Traps: The Survival of an American Armored Division in World War II

by Belton Y. Cooper

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Death Traps 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Extremly well writen acount of an Army Ordinance officer and how He prefomed his dutys under some of the worst conditions a young man may experiance. Mr. Cooper explians how General Paton was responible for our Army had to fight the German Army in a tank with too thin armore and a too small gun. The German tanks out classed the Sherman tank in nearly evrry way. He explains how Paton turned down the M26 Pershing in 43 by stateing that the M4 Sherman was as good as any German tank. Evan against the advice of his own armored division commanders. He descibes how easy it was for a German tank could destroy an American tank and how hard it was and how many Sherman tanks it took to destroy the German tanks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well written report on tank warfare in WWII. Explains why the U.S. chose to build an inferior tank which resulted in the slaughter of thousands of allied troops. The author seems to have been well informed about all aspects of the war and especially about the workings of tanks.
Jerry2 More than 1 year ago
Well, I'm about halfway through the book and its pretty good but it seems to be a description of the Normandy invasion more than a description of maintaining and recovering Shermans. There is some information in that regard, but so far most of the text is describing the progress of the 3rd Armored division. Anyway, still a good book but didn't seem to match my expectation from seeing the cover and title.
TheLoon 11 months ago
One of those under reported issues of WW II, just how inferior our Sherman tanks were to whatever the Germans put out there against them. Cooper pulls no punches and clearly lays out the case that our men in tanks were just spent to get the job done even though they had little chance in a direct encounter. Made me realise how lucky we were not have been on the Eastern Front.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very+interesting+read+for+WWII+military+history+buffs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have a complete new understanding of WWII and the men and machines they used to fight and survive. May God Bless these men and what they accomplished that we can learn to live in peace and settle our future problems without going to war.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I+have+read+a+great+many+WWII+books.++This+one+had+a+lot+of+new+information+about+the+drive+across+France+and+Germany.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Easy read. Authentic first and second hand accounts of WW2 armoured warfare.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Worth a read as a memoir, but a lot of historical inaccuracies. Cooper does not distinguish between his observations, his opinions, and things he heard through the grapevine, presenting everything as fact. This is not a researched historical work and should not be taken as such. Well worth a read if one remembers to assess every statement critically, but unfortunately this book has reinforced many untrue myths about WWII, especially when it came to things which were beyond the purview of a junior line officer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the book but wish he had gone more into the actual tank battles. Plans, strategies, that sort of thing. Clearly the US Army was out "tanked". But knowing this what did our leaders did or did not do to compensate would have been smething worth exploring.
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LaYank More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book but found that the author repeated sections such as his comparisons between American and German armor. This was an interesting book and I encourage those interested in that area of history to read this book.
RogCBrand More than 1 year ago
I like the different view of this book- an ordnance officer who has to deal with keeping the tanks and other vehicles running, making sure those that are badly damaged get repaired and those that are beyond repair are replaced, all while having to travel back and forth through ground that isn't fully cleared of the enemy.
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