A Crazy Little Thing Called Death (Blackbird Sisters Series #6)

A Crazy Little Thing Called Death (Blackbird Sisters Series #6)

by Nancy Martin

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Crazy Little Thing Called Death (Blackbird Sisters Series #6) 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
KokoOH More than 1 year ago
The characters are too cutsy and overwhelming. Characters introduced at the beginning sometimes don't show up again till several chapters later and I found myself going back constantly to see who they are and how they pertain. I found myself wanting to scream at the main character, Nora, for letting her sisters take advantage of her in the way they did. If this book was suppose to have humor, I did not see it. This book was a pathetic attempt on the writers part to instill sympathy in a bunch of misfits who are very unlikable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved the other Blackwell sister books, however, there was so much extra curricular activity in this book you forget there is or isn't a murder to solve. Nora is still a good strong character, but her sisters and their posse are so annoying. It was hard to push myself to get the last chapter, where the story finally redeems itself. Hopefully the next novel in the saga will cut the chatter, but I may just skip it anyway.
TheLibraryhag on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nora finds herself in the middle of yet another mystery, this time: What happened to a local celebrity and whose hand was it that she found at the polo match? Yep, it can only be a Blackbird Sisters Mystery. These books never fail to delight. The couture alone is worth reading the book. But there is so much more. Best read in series, otherwise, the mind just might boggle.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Such a great series!
I_Want_To_Be_Sam More than 1 year ago
This is a fabulous series. The wacky antics of the Blackbird sisters will leave you wanting more and more. The adventures these sisters get themselves into is believable and realistic. Their story is heartwarming and you will fall in love with them all. One of the best things about Nora and her amateur sleuthing is she doesn't push it into crazy I can't believe she did that adventure that you get with a lot of the other stories in this genre. Nora is realistic in her adventure keeping the sleuthing fun and easy like you would expect from someone with out in training. If you want a laugh a lot kind of book without having to pull your hair out for the stupidity of the main character that never seems to learn than this is the series for you. Nora Blackbird is a smart woman that knows how to get the job done.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love love love this series. I wish there were more of them. They are a light and entertaining read.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is part of the Blackbird Sisters stories by Nancy Martin. Each of the books can stand alone but the total of the series is riveting. I eagerly anticipated each book and scooped them up as soon as they were available. An excellent read with well defined characters, and a strong tug for the underdog.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just discovered this author and book by accident. Where has she been? Talk about hitting the proverbial nail on the head while giving you a good story! The plot: Nora Blackbird (yes, that's her name) is a Philadelphia blueblood who's broke. To up her stock, she agrees to marry a mobster, from New Jersey no less, shocking the 'main line' in Philly-town. Then the second part of the equation: Penny Devine (star and relations to the Philly crowd) goes missing. This all leads to a sleuth-type who donnit that will keep you flipping the pages. The books is filled with enough characters and situations to seed five novels, but they all fall together in this one just fine. A very satisfying effort from a new discoverd author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nancy Martin does it again with her new book A CRAZY LITTLE THING CALLED DEATH. It's the sixth book in the Blackbird Sisters Mysteries. Ms. Martin has done a wonderful job of writing a series book that can stand alone without having read the earlier books in the series. For the new reader, be warned. Once you've read A CRAZY LITTLE THING CALLED DEATH, you'll want to read the other five books in the Blackbird Sisters Mysteries. Once again, Nora finds herself embroiled in a society mystery, while continuing to deal with the financial mess her parents left behind when they absconded with her and her sisters' trust funds. In her role as society reporter for a Philadelphia newspaper, Nora covers a memorial party and polo match hosted by the brother of former child star, Sweet Penny Devine. Ms. Devine is missing and presumed dead. Nora's discovery of a severed hand, thought to be that of missing Penny Devine, pulls Nora into the heart of the investigation, bringing her into close contact with Detective Ben Bloom, who seems to have to past with Nora's on-again, off-again, on-again boyfriend/fiancée Michael (aka Mick) Abruzzo. But Nora's involvement is only a distraction from her personal concerns¿grief over a recent miscarriage, apprehension about her engagement to Mick Abruzzo, son of a reputed New Jersey mob boss and her sisters' activities, which are giving her cause for alarm. Emma is taking secret phone calls from men, quoting prices and making midnight assignations. Recent widow and new mother Libby seems to be on a quest for her next husband. Plus, we get some insight into Nora's past and her history with a visiting polo play, Raphael Braga. Ms. Martin has done a wonderful job of weaving threads and subplots throughout, tying them all up nicely in a bow at the end. Her view of Philadelphia society, and in this particular book, the polo set is fiendishly funny. It's a fun read. Enjoy!
harstan More than 1 year ago
Their parents wasted away in record time their trust funds so the three Blackbird sisters, former socialites, struggle to live above the poverty line. Nora accepts the proposal of Mick Abruzzo the stunner for high society is not that Mick is the son of an infamous mobster, but that a Philadelphia blue blood would agree to marry someone from Jersey.--------------- Whereas Nora thinks her sister Emma is working the sheet trade with partners named John to bring in income, her other sibling Libby, on a hiatus from baby production, plans the social wedding of the century albeit with no money. However, Nora¿s biggest problem is her fiancé. Someone wants Mick dead, but though everyone else assumes it is the Blackbird Curse in full bloom as grooms die young when they wed a Blackbird woman, she believes it ties to her future in-law¿s family business. Of course Mick almost dying seems normal when compared to the socialite parents of the vanished Penny Devine declaring her dead before the police have had enough legal time to declare her missing. To Nora this is just another scandal in high society.------------ The latest Blackbird Sister mystery is a delightful lighthearted satirical tale that jabs at the pretentiousness of the upper class. The fast-paced story line leaps from one crisis to a deeper calamity as Nora cannot help herself from becoming involved in various happenings starting with stopping her two sisters, to keeping Mick alive at least until she can declare widowhood and finally learning what happened to the divine Penny. Fans of the series will thouroughly enjoy the heroine¿s predicaments as she tries to save society one Blackbird at a time.-------- Harriet Klausner