Confessions of a Wall Street Analyst: A True Story of Inside Information and Corruption in the Stock Market

Confessions of a Wall Street Analyst: A True Story of Inside Information and Corruption in the Stock Market

by Daniel Reingold, Jennifer Reingold

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Confessions of a Wall Street Analyst: A True Story of Inside Information and Corruption in the Stock Market 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dan Reingold hits a bullseye on his book, Confession of a Wall Street Analyst. Read his book and come face to face with a financial business which is laden with conflicts of interest. If anyone should know, it is Dan. He was one of the top telcommunicatons analysts, at the pinnacle, Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch, Credit Suisse First Boston... If anyone does not think the stock market is rigged for the benefit of the insiders, read this book...As George Orwell once said,'In a time of universal deceipt, telling the truth is a courageous act.' Hats off to Dan Reingold & Jennifer Reingold!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I highly recommend this book. It achieves with great success the winning formula for quality non-fiction -- an exciting true story told in a very readable way. It is truly a page-turner. The fact that the subject matter, including details of finance and securities, is unfamiliar to non-Wall Street types, makes the story-like atmosphere all the more impressive. You definitely feel as though you¿ve joined an insider on a wild, wild ride. The tale of the rise of telecom within the stock market boom of the late `90s is one of amazing twists and turns, crazy personalities and of course, ultimately, a crash as startling as the rise itself. There are many detailed scenes and memorable images, notably of various meetings with the biggest of Wall Street¿s big shots, that are truly too bizarre to believe. I followed much of what went on in telecom and Wall Street in general as it happened, but having now read this book, I feel I have a real understanding of what went on on the inside, and I can't believe how truly amazed I am -- the depth of it all went beyond even my most cynical view. The author, Dan Reingold, does an amazing job of relating his personal experiences while weaving them into the overall theme. He is clearly Derek Jeter to Jack Grubman's Barry Bonds. I imagine that he may receive criticism from people (likely those still working on Wall Street) who feel the picture presented is too negative or who question his motives (though he has noted that all proceeds are being contributed to charity). But I think it is clear ¿ he told the story as he saw it and lived it -- nothing more. There were even many instances in which he admitted bad decisions (or indecisions) and regrets. But the motive seems clear to me -- it was an important, relevant story that should be told, hasn't been fully told, and is of interest and importance to many. He had a front row seat and was in a unique position to tell it. And as a reader, I couldn¿t put the book down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anyone with more than a passing interest in the worlds of Telecom or Wall Street will enjoy and learn from this insider's tale. It is at once a very broad and very personal story, with many astounding behind-the-scenes revelations from the boom/bust years of the US telecom industry, and the incredible financial ride it took. A morality play and cautionary tale, recommended for any business reader. Reingold should also be commended for his calls/recommendations for genuine Wall Street reform.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Reingold decides to write a story of corruption on Wallstreet. His story comes off as a bitter, vindictive writer who portrays his arch nemesis Jack Grubman as a poster child for corrution on wall street. After first few chapters, we as a reader get it. Mr. Reingold hates this man. Yet over and over, the book hashes over the failings of Mr. Grubman. Mr. Reingold states the wallstreet is so corrupt and is the reason for this book. But basically his distaste for Mr. Grubman seem to stem not from the illegal and unethical tactics of Jack Grubman's obtaining and disseminating informations but rather by jealousness that the author wasn't privy to the same kind of information (and thus corruption). Mr. Reingold complains about the corruption, yet he did absolutely zero about this. Reingold comes across as a whiner and he can't seem to admit that he can be as guilty ethically as a person he is crucifying in this book
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dan Reingold takes you behind the scenes and exposes what many insiders knew but weren't telling about the conflicts of interest between investors, Wall Street and the Corporate America. Dan is best suited to tell this story because 1. He was there - as a top ranked analyst in one of the hottest bull market sectors at several of the most prominent Wall Street firms, 2. He was there long enough to have perspective of how the game changed for the worse, and 3. He could afford to speak out because he had nothing to hide. Many others who could tell the story, can't because of their own egregious roles in it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dan's book is an honest, excellent and often funny look at what happened during the NASDAQ bubble in the late '90's. I have first hand knowledge of the conflicts of interest faced by research analysts at that time and Dan captures these situations extremely well. A must read for anyone who is planning to work on Wall Street or lived through the bubble, but even those who haven't enjoy the work. Well done Dan!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Reingold's so-called confessional has one material drawback, he neglects to confess to his 'sins' which were many and no different than the rest of the so-called independent analysts. Mr. Reingold conveniently forgot to mention his role as an advsior to companies, as an aggressive seeker of banking business, as someone who took public and supported many companies who went bankrupt, as someone whose ATT bullishness was intellectually inconsistent with his pro-Bell stance and most importantly as someone who did things far more egregious than writing stupid emails, namley directly threatening corporate officers with research retalliation for not giving one of Dan's multiple employers banking business (he got paid handsomely to hop around three firms to do all the things he accuses others of). This is a shameless, self-rigeous portrayal by a delusional character who clearly is still demonized by his failure to rise to the stature of others in the industry. He should be grateful, otherwise his many transgression would too have been subject of regulatory scrutiny. If he had written a true confessional where he admitted his part in the overall mix, even while saying others were 'worse', this would be more palatable. Unfortunately, it is relegated to the rants of a still bitter man. Mr. Reingold should be reminded of the old adage, 'people who live in glass houses should not throw stones.'