Cien años de soledad (50 Aniversario) (One Hundred Years of Solitude)

Cien años de soledad (50 Aniversario) (One Hundred Years of Solitude)

by Gabriel García Márquez

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Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 85 reviews.
FocoProject More than 1 year ago
Not the first time I read the book, to be honest. My dad had actually recommended it to me back in High School and I had indeed picked it up and read it cover to cover, mostly during one long swim meet weekend, between heats. However, reading it now, almost fifteen years later, I wonder if I really read it the first time, or if I really knew what exactly it was that I was reading. Though certain concepts remained the same, there was a lot here I did not remember and which struck me as brand new. Certainly one can chuck it up to a forgetful memory, a lot of ish does happen in over a decade, but I was still struck by how this book took me by surprise all over again.

As the title implies, this book is about Solitude, one hundred years of it, in fact and all of it centered around the Buendia family, starting with Jose Aureliano Buendia and his wife, Ursula, who are part of the group of people that founded a tiny town named Macondo in the middle of the bog. Largely untouched by the outside world, Macondo develops under it¿s own self imposed structure and law and the families grow. However, our point of view is always kept through the eyes of the Buendia¿s.

Ironically enough the very concept of Solitude was entirely lost to me as a high school student. Probably because I was still submerged in an environment where the idea had not taken root. Reading it now, the entire story is soaked in it, solitude suffocates every character in a way that even with the humor, the tenderness, the beauty that this story encompasses, it is not enough to get past that melancholy feeling.

The book takes us over a whole century of the Buendia family, with Ursula Buendia being the only character that manages to tie it all together until close to the end. Me meet all the Jose¿s and all the Arcadios that are born and are introduced to some very interesting women as well like Remedios, Rebeca and Amaranta, all characters fully fleshed out and quirky in their own way to help make of this story an epic.

I highly recommend this one, though be aware for some magical realism, which I guess is what they call this type of story which is set in a real world but where magical reasons for things are often taken as logical explanations for how things actually happen. It is a touch of spice that takes this story to a whole other level of enjoyment.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this book, I have read this book four times in the last 19 years. Once in english and three in spanish (there is a slight difference) I always miss the characters after Im done reading. Great book...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read "solitude" in English many years ago and would like to read it again. I will attempt to read the original Spanish but it may take me 100 years. Maybe its a good exercise for my aging brain but I would really like the translation so that I could see if I am understanding correctly. Come on B&N...offer the English translation please!
dee_deesmilez More than 1 year ago
La primera vez que lo leí fue para mi clase de lectura y redaccion y no le preste mucha atencion. Cuando volvi a leer el libro quedé enamorada, los personajes, la historia, todo. Jamas me cansare de leer el libro. He leido como 5 obras literarias del sr. Gabriel García Márquez y cada vez estoy mas facinada. Espero en Dios que él se encuentre bien, supe que padece de cancer y es una gran pena. Dios le de salud.
ximenarive More than 1 year ago
La forma de narrar y el lexico del escritor es encantador, te mantiene atento de principio a fin.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book gave me a new style of Writing. It contains wisdom and Phylosophy.
BestinBrooklyn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the best book I have ever read. Years of history flow seamlessly as the history of a family is recounted in historical, emotional and spiritual terms. If you are of hispanic background this book will be of particular resonance to you. Not to stereotype or to generalize, but all hispanic families have a, or perhaps several members of the family that share characteristics similar to those of one or several of the characters in this novel.
Liz619 More than 1 year ago
This is a classic in Spanish culture
UrsNYC More than 1 year ago
This book is a complete masterpiece by Garcia Marquez, it is a must for people who like great novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is all about universality. I read it in Spanish, and I could not stop reading. I can see why this book has so much recognition, and why Marquez was compared to Miguel de Cervantes...he is an amazing writer. The book begins with the establishment of a new village named Macondo. The book is about the cycle of history. I can say much more than this (belive me, I can write a book on just this one book), but I might get carried away. All I have to say is, if you have not read One Hundred Years of Solitude, you have not read any powerful literature. Go get it...NOW!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jamas me gusto leer, incluso para mi era uno de los peores castigos. Haste que un dia me propuse que agarraria un libro y lo leeria de principio a fin. Este fue el libro que agarre y la verdad me quede enamorada de forma que el hace reales sus personajes. Es mi escritor favorito, es realmente un libro muy interesante y si, lo recomiendo.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Aunque ya habia leido varios libros de este mismo author, este es el cual cautivo mi atencion por completo. El modo en el que se desarrolla te hace pensar si realmente habra cien años de 'soledad'
Guest More than 1 year ago
Un libro que tiene la capacidad de transportanos a un mundo casi real, una trabajo monumental en el cual sobresaltan los temas familiares y magicos. Perfecto para un tiempo de vacasiones. Me encanto la facilidad que puede tener uno para involucrarse en la historia, y la desorbitante manera de contar los sucesos fragmentadamente en la novela que la hacen una pieza que uno no quiere parar de leer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Para mi el libró Cien Años fue el mejor libro que e leído. Aun que al principio me perdía entre los capítulos por que García Márquez, brincaba de un personaje a otro, me logro cautivar y siempre me mantuvo ahí, en suspenso con los locos personaje de macondo y la Familia Buendía. Mi personaje favorito fue ¿Aureliano segundo¿ por que siempre quería estar bañándose con campaña, y malgastando su dinero.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Es maravilloso, los personajes son todos distintos. Es como ver una película, por la cantidad de descripciones que posee. Es ver morir a toda una generación. El autor lo hizo de una manera increible. TIENES QUE LEERLA... Mi personaje favorito es; Remedios, la bella.
carlosmock 16 days ago
The book is written from a third-person universal point of view that changes, sometimes, within a paragraph. There are run-of sentences and interminable paragraphs that make reading it difficult. The names are repeated on each generation that at times you don't know who they are talking about. But it is part of the theme: "Although the story can be read as a linear progression of events, both when considering individual lives and Macondo's history, García Márquez allows room for several other interpretations of time: "...and once again she shuddered with the evidence that time was not passing, as she had just admitted, but that it was turning in a circle." p. 284-5. "Both described at the same time how it was always March, and always Monday, and they understood that Jose Arcadio Buendía was not crazy as the family said, but that he was the only one who had enough lucidity to sense the truth of the fact that time also stumbled and had accidents and could, therefore, splinter and leave an eternalized fragment in a room." p. 296. García-Márquez reiterates the metaphor of history as a circular phenomenon through the repetition of names and characteristics belonging to the Buendía family. Over six generations, all the José Arcadios possess inquisitive and rational dispositions as well as enormous physical strength. The Aurelianos, meanwhile, lean towards insularity and quietude. This repetition of traits reproduces the history of the individual characters and, ultimately, a history of the town as a succession of the same mistakes ad infinitum due to some endogenous hubris in our nature. The novel explores the issue of timelessness or eternity even within the framework of mortal existence. A major trope with which it accomplishes this task is the alchemist's laboratory in the Buendía family home. The laboratory was first designed by Melquíades near the start of the story and remains essentially unchanged throughout its course. It is a place where the male Buendía characters can indulge their will to solitude, whether through attempts to deconstruct the world with reason as in the case of José Arcadio Buendía, or by the endless creation and destruction of golden fish as in the case of his son Colonel Aureliano Buendía. Furthermore, a sense of inevitability prevails throughout the text. This is a feeling that regardless of what way one looks at time, its encompassing nature is the one truthful admission. On the other hand, it is important to keep in mind that One Hundred Years of Solitude, while basically chronological and "linear" enough in its broad outlines, also shows abundant zigzags in time, both flashbacks of matters past and long leaps towards future events. One example of this is the youthful amour between Meme and Mauricio Babilonia, which is already in full swing before we are informed about the origins of the affair. García-Márquez writes in the style that has been coined "magical realism." Starting with Alejo Carpentier's "marvelous realism, " the writing is now more exaggerated, yet, more real. There are ghosts in the novel that are as real as the characters. There is the sickness of insomnia--where the Buendía family can't sleep and starts to forget events and people. García Márquez goes to the extreme of having José Arcadio label people and things, just to remember them. Then there's the labeling of who they are and what things do because they start to forget what the labels mean. On page 118, after José Arcadio comes home, h
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excelente
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Creativo, hermoso e inespetado,no hay un parrafo sin una aventura, genio de la literatura
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hi l am abbie peck I love softball its so much fun. Im wearing a purple and white shirt and navy pants that go up to my knees. Im also wearing black vans.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this book