The Boy Who Loved Batman: A Memoir

The Boy Who Loved Batman: A Memoir

by Michael E. Uslan

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The Boy Who Loved Batman 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Tootman More than 1 year ago
You don't have to be a Baby Boomer, a comic book junkie, a Hollywood insider or from Jersey to appreciate Michael Uslan's creative writing style and unique story-telling talent. By realizing his dream of creating dark, serious Batman movies, the author has thus removed the words "Pow! Zap! Wham! (often flashed across the screen in the 1960s campy TV Batman series whenever the Dynamic Duo hit a bad guy) from their association with the Dark Knight. Mrs. Stiller and Mrs. Friedman, the author's 7th and 8th grade English teachers would be proud. "The Boy Who Loved Batman" is a witty, funny, heartwarming account of growing up in the 1950s and 1960s. Be prepared to laugh your butt off and cheer at Michael's perseverance and success at beating the odds with his creativity, risk taking and hard work. Bottom line: You'll love "The Boy Who Loved Batman."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Perfect read for any dc comic batman fan. Check it out you won't be let down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Goodbook
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whos ur favorite super hero
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It s good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nicely written, very interesting. Great biography for anyone to read about striving for your goals.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Slurpy More than 1 year ago
First off it's worth noting that this is a memoir, so it's not all about Batman. It's about the life of Michael Uslan, the man who is most directly responsible for bringing Batman back to the masses after the '60s campiness made him a laughingstock to the public. So while there is lots of history about Batman in pop culture, there is also a lot about how he developed as a person, as well as his experiences with comic book culture, such as his work at DC and experiences teaching the first accredited college-level comic book history course. Secondly, I am by no means a comic fan - my entire comics collection is limited to a few "Far Side" books and four of what're generally regarded the best of the Batman stories, such as "The Dark Knight Returns." My interest in Batman is mainly focused on the animated series and the live action films. That being said, as a person who likes understanding WHY Hollywood makes some of the (horrible) decisions it does, this book had a lot of interesting insight about Batman's decline into campiness, and his subsequent resurrection (ignoring Schumacher's backslide, which the author laments) into serious film as the eponymous Dark Knight. Perfectly accessible to any person willing to pick up a book with "Batman" in the title.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like trains
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IS IT A SHOW OR A BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fgffgddbdgsdgfgd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't read it but he seems to be in collusion with the dickheads who are blocking the rights to the original TV series in which case, no matter how good the modern Batman is. He is also a dickhead.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
NO WAY YOUR GONNA MAKE ME JA READ THAT!!!!!!!!