America

America

by E. R. Frank

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America : A Novel 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for a school project and at first I was thinking 'OH GAWD' but this book turned out to be wonderful. It is very touching and releastic. America goes through so much in his life. It has some suprises but im not going to tell you. JUST GO READ IT!!!!
artistlibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
After two months of listserv posts on what material is or is not appropriate for an age group, I¿m wondering what these people worked up over ¿crap¿ and ¿geez¿ in Luv Ya Bunches thought of America when it was published in 2002. As a social worker and psychotherapist, Frank has the perfect understanding of the typical wrecked teen/adult mentor interaction. And while I can understand people¿s concerns with having teens read the kind of language America uses, I think teens would know that it was being softened by a kind of censorship and perhaps not read the novel. I simply don¿t know how else Frank could have created America without curses.America is lost and angry and scared and confused. You read his thoughts and perspective on others in his language and at his pace. Because Frank breaks up the writing into small detailed memories or asides, it¿s a great book for more reluctant readers who need to pace themselves. It also allows the reader to pay attention to America¿s memories and points of view - they don¿t get lost in lengthy prose, echoing America¿s own fear at being forgotten amid the chaos.Since America is writing the story, you aren¿t angry at this bad boy and his obscenities because you get to hear where they are coming from. You must reflect on who he actually is and how he got to be the personality that¿s shouting at you or hitting you or walking out the door on you. It¿s carefully done so that regular teens (those non-violent and not lost in the social services system) can relate to America¿s feelings yet the character remains independent. And if America can survive growing up, we all can.
beckykolacki on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
America starts off as a book about a 15 year old boy who is in some sort of mental home. He is what you might typically picture when you picture the "bad boy" that has depression and tried to kill himself. He's stubborn, he curses all the time, and he refuses to talk to his therapist. He even occasionally throws chairs or other things.However, the novel alternates between the present time, and America in the mental hospital, and the past. We learn that America was a crack baby, and grew up with a foster parent until he was in Kindergarten. He ten goes to visit his mother, who promptly abandons him to his older brothers (around ages 7 and 9). The three boys live on their own for 2 years. We continue to learn about America's past, and all of the horrible things he endured. In many ways we become sympathetic.Although I kept wanting to read and find out more, I was also very disturbed while I was reading. I feel like you expect the story to go one way: you think that there¿s the bad side, which is his mother, the drug addict, and two older brothers who have been living on their own for years from the age of 7, and then there¿s the good side, which is sweet Mrs. Harper who takes good care of him. However, the ¿good side¿ isn¿t all that good. Browning, Mrs. Harper¿s half brother, really turns out to be a terrible person. He not only allows this 7 year old to drink alcohol, he also makes him read dirty magazines. What¿s worse is that Browning also starts sexually abusing him. Turns out that living at Mrs. Harper¿s isn¿t so much better than living with his mother.It really got me thinking about how important it is to raise children the right way. Of course you can¿t always be perfect, but having a positive influence is so essential. The sad thing is, there are children who don¿t have this positive influence. You can really see how America is learning the wrong things about life. Sometimes it seemed like he didn¿t do what was right because he didn¿t know any better, or people told him that it was wrong. For instance, when Browning told him not to bother Mrs. Harper, he was too young to realize that he really should go and talk to her. In many ways, I found myself blaming Mrs. Harper. Maybe that¿s horrible to say, but if she was that old, and in that poor medical condition, she probably shouldn¿t have been adopting a young boy. Aside from that, she should never have entrusted him to Browning. She may not have known that he was sexually abusive, but she certainly did know that he was an alcoholic and chain smoker. I¿m not sure why she thought it was okay to leave America in his hands, instead of trying to find someone that could truly take care of him.This book allowed me to see things from a point of view I might not normally see from. While it was disturbing, it was also interesting and at least a little bit hopeful at the end.
mysteena on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
America is the story of a young boy who gets lost in the foster care system and is struggling to overcome the trauma of his life. It is a harsh book, full of f-bombs. It was hard for me to read on many levels, but the language is simply a result of the horrible things he's had to live through. The story itself, while heartbreaking, is also a testament to the resiliency of the human spirit.
becskau on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is the story of a lost boy named America and his life through the various systems put in place to help. He drifts from one home to another, foster homes, different caretakers and even being homeless. I think this book would be affective in the classroom because it is so incredibly moving. This is a powerful tool for students to think about larger social issues
WittyreaderLI on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
America is a troubled boy. That's the best way to describe him. He has no real family. His mother is a drug addict. One of his brothers is abusive, and the other is crazy. His foster mother is elderly and his other caretaker is sexually abusing him. Basically, America has a difficult life. The book takes place in a mental instituion with flashbooks. The book is gritty, hard hitting and powerful. I enjoyed it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TANDT More than 1 year ago
Personally i love this book!!! I think this book is good for age's 11 and up, because this book is really easy to understand. This book will make you cry, laugh, think, etc. If i could i would suggest it to almost everyone who knew how to read and likes drama. I also gave this book to my grandmas, sister, mom, cousins etc. and they all agree with me.I will not tell you all the details because then you will judge the book and you CANT judge a book!! well i hope you will read this book and enjoy it!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love this book! I have got a few of my friends to read it as well and they agree with me that it is amazing. This story is told in a series of flashbacks while the boy named America is talking to a Psychiatrist after he attempted to kill himself. But the reasons for America to try killing himself are reasons that would make most people want the same thing. He was sexually abused by someone he trusted when he was only nine than killed that same man. Than he ran away and had to live on his own for several months. Eventually after his suicide attempt he ends up in the place with the shrink. He is 15 and doesnt know right from wrong and only has about a third or fourth grade education. He is overly confused and doesnt want to be alive but his shrink never gives up on him even though he doesnt talk. I think this is an awsome story but it is sad. I read the entire thing in one night because it was sooo good and I have read it a few times since. This is one of my favorite books I've read and i have read a lot of good books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AMERICA uses gritty language authentic to the experience of the protagonist but really he is antagonist. Also it's not appropriate as a library book because really it have a lot of sex part. But I do like the book because it shows the endurance of a young boy growing up in a really hardship moment. This book shows theIt shows the crippling horror of abuse to an innocent child and his experiences growing old from a broken home. This book also shows the uninspirational or overwhelmingly disturbing of a young boy. But most importantly this book show a story of a troubled teen lost in the system of mental care and more importantly lost in the world and himself. "America" is a powerful sophomore effort that reminded me of Han Nolan's "Born Blue" and "Cut" by Patricia McCormick and it does have important things to say about physical and sexual abuse, guilt, anger, finding oneself and the value of love. Reading this as a teen is really great this show the differ point of view of a teenage live shows that your not the only one in need but many more ahead of you are the one the need it the most. Also the book infer to me that theres people out there that can help you like the character Dr.B, even though America threaten him to kill him and America also assault him Dr.B still didn't gave up on AmericaThe story of America is a captivating story told through the eyes of America, a troubled teenage boy on teh brink of adulthood. The book's auther, E.R. Frank, depicts the life of America as a teenager with sudden flashbacks going all the way back to the main character's childhood. The book switches back and forth between `then' and `now' showing the experiences that brought America to the office of Dr. B, the psychiatrist who just may be able to help him decide against committing suicide. Favorite Quotes "You have to watch what you say here because everything you say means something and somebody's always telling you what you mean" (p. 1). "Can't believe it's s--- made this garden grow," I tell her. "Believe it," she tells me. "The more s--- things get, the better they come this is my favorite quotes because it shows the boy of understanding live and the world. I recommend this book for any who's emotional and really enjoying a teenage live from begging to end
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SJKessel More than 1 year ago
Frank, E.R. (2002). America. New York: Simon Pulse. 9780689857720 The story of sexually abused and institutionalized fifteen-year-old America is a challenge to get through. Written by a clinical social worker who has "known many Americas," the book switches back and forth between 'then' and 'now' showing the experiences that brought America to the office of Dr. B, the psychiatrist who just may be able to help him decide against committing suicide. America struggles with being 'lost' and feeling abandoned and unloved. He must deal with issues involving his distant relationships with violent half-brothers, his mixed racial background which not even he can specify since he does not know his father and with his questions over his sexual orientation. While I don't like to give spoilers in general, I do feel, with this book, it is important to know there is hope and comfort at the end of this novel. The book was recently made into a made-for-tv movie staring Rosie, O'Donnell. Activities to do with the book: America would be good for encouraging empathy and reflective journal writing. It can also be used with struggling teenage readers because the book includes American's own struggle to become literate. Other discussion topics include the use of America as a name, issues of love, forgiveness, trust, suicide, abandonment and recovery. The book could also be paired with Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak (1999) because both books deal with trauma, secrets, metaphors connecting plants with growth, and physical labor assisting in recovery. Favorite Quotes "You have to watch what you say here because everything you say means something and somebody's always telling you what you mean" (p. 1). "Can't believe it's s--- made this garden grow," I tell her. "Believe it," she tells me. "The more s--- things get, the better they come out" (p. 237). FOR MORE OF MY REVIEWS, VISIT sjkessel.blogspot.com.
Guest More than 1 year ago
America is a really good book. I didn't think it would be since it came from my school library but it was off the chains!:)
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been in love with this book since I've first read it about two years ago, because I can really relate to it. This book has inspired me to become a counselor like Mr. B, and I'm currently working on that in college. I'm pleased with the author's work because nothing in this book is sugar-coated, it's not like other books that just don't seem real enough. I've read it many times since then, and now I have my own copy...and I'm keeping it FOREVER!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
the only book i've ever decided to willingly read twice. it's got the natural dysfunctional lifestyle that the main character portrays. awesome to read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book in 7th grade and I loved it then as much I love it now. America is a very interesting character and you feel emotionally attached to him, and you want to help him out, along with his doctor.I feel a lot like him in some ways, E.R. Frank is a great author and this book shows that.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was incredible. It was given to me by my mom for my birthday, after she nonchalantly it up at a barnes and noble. I started reading it the next day, and couldnt put it down. Literally. i finished it 2 days later. it was an incredible book, and i would reccommend EVERYONE read it, its incredible.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really loved this book! Some, ignorant people might say that nothing like this could happen to someone. But the truth is that things like this go on every day. It's the sad truth that there are many Americas in this world. This really hightens peopls awareness about life on the streets or in the inner city. It's great to see how America finnaly learns to trust someone and for the first time in his life feels safe. There is a lot of bad language in it but in my opnion it makes it even more relistc. I would reccomend it for kids 12 and up.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I got this book, I was told it was a bit depressing. When I started actually reading it, I cried. I practically cried on the first page. This book has capurted so many emotions that America, the boy in the story, has felt. When I cry, I sometimes don't want to read anymore, but how Mr. Frank writes this story just makes you want to read more. This is an awesome book, though I wouldn't recommend if you are too sensitive to violence, language or child abuse.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a great book. I would reccomend it to anyone. There are some mature topics though, so I would not let anyone under the age of twelve read it. E. R. Frank did a great job. Superb writing.