After America

After America

by John Birmingham

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After America 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 48 reviews.
Rick_WeberFan More than 1 year ago
The first book wasn't all that bad. This is where it's truly sinks in that you're reading a book written by a leftist wacko. By the time you get to Angels of Vengeance you're sure that Birmingham thinks that the military is nothing but a bunch of sickos, that anyone who believes in the security of our borders is akin to being a murderer and that only Fox is biased. The covers look really cool. The second and third books of this series are nauseating.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is an entertaining continuation to the book "Without Warning" but even 150 pages from the end I could see this story was not going to wrap up. Nothing was was brought to fruition and it leaves everything hanging at the end. The characters are varied and entertaining, the story is exciting and filled with detail but not dragging. Where is the climax? Sort of like the someone intended this to simply be a bridge to the next book. That being said, when the next book comes you will be in the dark if you do not read this one. I was a little disappointed, but not so discouraged that I will not read the next one in the line.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Several years have passed since the catastrophic wave of energy destroyed the United States in 2003 that came like a tsunami Without Warning. Scientists remained baffled with what caused it, why it abruptly vanished a year later and how to prevent a return. In the meantime the White House moved to Seattle where American President James Kipper is frustrated with no answers and as is the case with the traumatized people struggling to endure, he fears what will happen if another such wave assaults the continent. Still he pushes forward with the greatest reconstruction project in the history of the world. President Kipper visits the Declared Security Zone of New York where militia and pirates rule the city and the burbs, but is greeted by an assassination attempt. At the same time in the breakaway republic of Texas, farmer Miguel Pieraro follows the path to citizenship in the New America until an ethnic cleansing campaign led by a rogue army officer destroys his family. In England, American army officer Caitlin Monroe struggles to survive an assault on her life. Finally, in the wasteland of the Middle East comes a major threat to what is left of the world. Between lawlessness on the eastern seaboard and what is occurring overseas and in Texas, Kipper, a builder by heart, needs to find his warrior fortitude as he is reluctant to confront anyone with America still reeling; but ignoring the threats to local security will destroy the United States permanently. The sequel to Without Warning is a terrific exhilarating thriller that grips the audience from start to finish. Heroes are everywhere from every walk of life whether they are city engineers turned POTUS, a Mexican-American farmer, an overseas officer and others risking their lives against ruthless lethal fully armed adversaries. Readers will enjoy this exhilarating post-apocalyptic tale that stands alone, but enhanced by reading what the wave caused first. Harriet Klausner
rivkat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Reading this, I kept thinking about Rudyard Kipling. Birmingham is an excellent adventure writer with a great sfnal imagination who has totally bought into the Huntington ¿Clash of Civilizations¿ thesis. This is the second book in a series, which begins when an unknown force wipes out every living soul in a great teardrop shape covering most of the continental U.S. and significant portions of Mexico and Canada, so that what is spared of the U.S. is only Portland and surrounds, Hawai¿i, Alaska, and Americans overseas including a large portion of the military. Among other things, this results in an Israeli nuclear first strike, an Indo-Pakistani nuclear conflict, and the expulsion of many dark-skinned immigrants (and second- and third-generation citizens) from the UK, all of which are background.The narrative focuses on the President (a former civil engineer), a retired assassin brought back into active duty when someone tries to kill her husband and baby daughter, a South American immigrant trying to take advantage of the new U.S. settlement rules which award land to people willing to homestead, and a couple of other characters, including a Polish army officer gaining U.S. citizenship via military service and a child soldier brought to the U.S. to engage in jihad in the hotly contested/pirated/looted ruins of NYC. Basic message: the American dream is the right one; a lot of the people who epitomize the American dream are immigrants. Main bad guys: Muslims (there is one progressive Muslim character who helps the assassin). Secondary bad guys: white supremacist Americans from the breakaway Texas Republic. The President even says that they lost sight of the true American dream, so we know it¿s true. Greens (a powerful party, given that Portland¿s citizenry now represents a substantial percentage of America¿s) take a whupping too¿they ought to know that genetically engineered crops are the only hope now that the heartland is a wasteland. And Americans in the military are too politically correct, according to the Polish officer, uncomfortable with racial slurs even when they have no problems killing a group of African Muslims. I have the feeling that Birmingham, an Australian, is working through some sort of ¿I love humanity; it¿s people I hate¿ thing with America/Americans.On the one hand, Birmingham recognizes that every character has reasons for his (or occasionally her) beliefs and actions. Almost everyone does brutal things in order to survive; there are no innocents. On the other, Muslims are piratical rapists determined to wipe out all non-Muslims, so it¿s pretty clear which non-innocents Birmingham thinks have the better claims. It was just hard for me to follow the adventures of the protagonists, which had plenty of drama, without thinking about all the other people¿mostly from Africa and Asia¿dying from nuclear fallout, uprooted from the lands of their birth, or otherwise devastated, and wondering about how their stories would have gone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Couldn't lay it down.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a good 2 nd book in this series. My only complaint is it seemed to skip over a lot of information I wiuld have liked to know about how things developed after the wave. It just felt like it was setting up the next book instead of telling its own story. Having said that,it was still a good read with some interesting storyline developments especially of Sophie and her dad and the President .
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My husband loved this book and plans to order the next book in this storyline.
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Sansabiel More than 1 year ago
Very scary, very possible, although I don't know where our enemies would get a Wave, but the collapse of some societal norms, almost overnight, seems likely under a similar circumstances and I would like the hope that there would be some of capable of getting their act together enough to pull the rest of us through and force us to stop panicking and start rebuilding. I do wish I had known that this was a series since I got the sequel first and then read the first book after. A little warning would have been nice.
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